Course Listings | Fall 2011

Course information subject to change. Please check back frequently for updates. All courses are at 20 Cooper Square unless otherwise noted. To view a course description and syllabus, click on each course’s Title. Electives are the last tab and are available to all students.

» Undergraduate Journalism

Methods and Practice: Point of View

Fri 12:20p-4:00p

James McBride

Methods and Practice: Point of View

Instructor: James McBride

Course ID: JOUR-UA 202, section 001

Days: Fri 12:20p-4:00p

Room: 20 Cooper Square,7th Floor Library

» Syllabus (PDF)

Be ready to write longhand. No computers. No cell phones in class. Pencil and
yellow legal sized paper only. Please be on time. Bring a jacket and a metro card.
For the first class, there is absolute silence when you enter the room. No
talking. Not even to say hello to your neighbor. You want to hear a hello? Here it
is: Hello. Now, no talking for the first ten minutes of class. It sounds stupid, but it
is our first exercise.

Good writing is all about finding the right detail or set of details that will show, not
tell, the event to the listener. You are always fighting gravity, always fighting the reader
who will close the paper, book, magazine and tune you out. We will focus on placing you
in the right mental place to find the details that will tell the story, from your perspective, in
a way that is honest to your truth and hold the reader.

There will be some reading aloud in class. There will be no bloodlettings. If
you’re willing to fail, you will be successful. If you’re already a journalistic success, this
isn’t the class for you. Remember, writing is the act of continually failing at excellence,
and uniformity is the ceiling against which great writing will forever bump. The mid term
and final will be your writing.

Before each class, you will be expected to read the following excerpts from “A
Nietzsche Reader” (Penguin) translated by R. J. Hollingdale. They are not long, but they
are important. We may alter this list based on my assessment of your abilities . Reading
assignments in Gary Smith and Micheal Herr’s books, as well as our Marvel Comic
class, will be assigned as we go deeper into the semester and I am able to assess your
abilities.

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Methods and Practice: Visual Reporting

Fri 10:00am - 1:40pm

Kathy Willens

Methods and Practice: Visual Reporting

Instructor: Kathy Willens

Course ID: JOUR-UA 203, section 001

Days: Fri 10:00am - 1:40pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course will train you to think, see, and take photos visually and journalistically. Using a 35mm SLR digital or film camera, you’ll learn how professional photojournalists make story-telling photographs suitable for publication in newspapers, magazines or online. By practicing the same skills professional photojournalists use, you will learn to document daily life and special events and how to capture fleeting moments with a camera. By semester’s end, you should have a basic understanding of the history of photojournalism and the impact photographs have on society, legal and ethical concerns of photojournalists, digital production of photographs, and the importance of captions and text accompanying those photos. You should also have a variety of photojournalistic images suitable for an entry-level portfolio.

 You are expected to develop story ideas, cover events, edit your own photographs and produce your own digitally scanned images using Adobe Photoshop, and burn them onto CD’s or DVD’s for classroom viewing and critiques.

 This is NOT a darkroom or basic photography class. The emphasis is on taking and editing pictures. A basic understanding of camera operation and exposure is required. All film and print developing or digital processing, is to be done outside of class.

 

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Elective Reporting Topics: Writing Memorable Magazine Profiles

Mon 1:00p-4:40p

Meryl Gordon

Elective Reporting Topics: Writing Memorable Magazine Profiles

Instructor: Meryl Gordon

Course ID: JOUR-UA 204, section 002

Days: Mon 1:00p-4:40p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 659

What makes a magazine profile grab you from the first paragraph and keep you interested for 5,000 words? How do you get story subjects to co-operate and give you enough time to get behind the public veneer? What are the different narrative ways to tell a story and make the person come alive on the page? The goal of this course is to learn the basic rules of profile writing, and also how and when to break them. The emphasis will be on writing a series of profiles of different types and lengths, from a 500-word person-in-the-news story to a Q&A to a full-fledged richly-textured portrait. Unlike covering breaking news, writing a magazine profile offers the opportunity to display a distinctive authorial voice and to project attitude in the give-and-take with your subject. We will read and analyze current profiles on the newsstand, as well as collections from New York Magazine and Vanity Fair. Guest speakers will include magazine editors and well-known writers.


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Production & Publication: TV Newscast

Tues 1:00p-7:00p

Nancy Han

Production & Publication: TV Newscast

Instructor: Nancy Han

Course ID: JOUR-UA 302, section 001

Days: Tues 1:00p-7:00p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, TV Studio (room 761)

» Syllabus (PDF)

Students in this class will be involved in every aspect of producing a television newscast. The weekly shows will be broadcast live on the NYU cable system and streamed online. Each student will take on a different role, from anchoring, line producing, directing, to running audio, prompter or EP’ing.  There will be strong emphasis on script writing, story selection and placement, as well as execution in the control room. The class assignments include both editorial and operational functions. Our class will act as a living newsroom where there is a tight deadline to get the show on the air. There will also be reporting assignments outside of the Tuesday class. “NYU Tonight” airs at 6pm every Tuesday for 30 minutes.  We will reconvene as a group from 630 to 7p for post-game discussion.

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Journalism Seminar: The Art of Opinion Writing & Polemic

Mon 10:00a-12:30p

Katie Roiphe

Journalism Seminar: The Art of Opinion Writing & Polemic

Instructor: Katie Roiphe

Course ID: JOUR-UA 401, section 001

Days: Mon 10:00a-12:30p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

The Art of Opinion Writing & Polemic

polemic  
Etymology: French polémique, from Middle French, from polemique controversial, from Greek polemikos warlike, hostile, from polemos war; perhaps akin to Greek pelemizein to shake. 1 a : an aggressive attack on or refutation of the opinions or principles of another b : the art or practice of disputation or controversy.

How does one break into the current arena of cultural debate and internet flurries of gossip and analysis?  How does one craft a charismatic and forceful opinion piece, or a long polemic? This course will examine the art  and history of opinion writing or polemic from Milton’s Satan to Christopher Hitchens. We will closely examine the construction of great and powerful and flamboyant and splashy and cranky arguments, and learn the practical skills  involved in writing a successful op-ed or stylish contrarian piece. We will examine and analyze various kinds of authority and how one projects them. We will entertain the idea of writing an ‘unbalanced’ piece as a virtue, and discuss how one generates the crazy confidence required for bravura performance in polemic. This is both a rigorous writing and reading class;  both an academic exploration of the uses of rhetoric and a practical class in a set of skills very useful in the current marketplace.

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Journalism & Society: Women and the Media

Thurs 9:30a - 12:30p

Carol Sternhell

Journalism & Society: Women and the Media

Instructor: Carol Sternhell

Course ID: JOUR-UA 503, section 001

Days: Thurs 9:30a - 12:30p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

Women & the Media is a collaborative seminar designed to examine the complex relationship
(or different, contradictory relationships) between those humans we call “women” and those
forms of discourse we call “media.” We will consider women both as subjects and objects, as
artists and models, as creators of “media” in its many forms and as media’s creations. What
does our culture’s “media” tell us about its ideas of gender? What, if anything, does our gender
tell us about our readings of “media”? Student participation in this seminar is key: students are
expected to attend all sessions, to complete all the reading (there's lots of reading!), to
participate actively in discussion, and to lead one of the class sessions themselves. Leading a
class means opening the day’s conversation with a presentation, critiquing and elaborating on
the assigned reading, bringing in additional relevant material, and suggesting questions or
issues that seem particularly interesting or troublesome. The purpose of the course is to
develop our critical and self-critical faculties as journalists, media critics, consumers of media,
and women or men—to think clearly, challenge our pet assumptions, and have fun.
Along with attendance and informed class participation, students are required to conduct a miniresearch
project and present their findings to the class. I want you to pick a “women and media”
topic that really interests you and then report the hell out of it. If you’re interested in the effect of
music videos on teenage girls, for instance, you would first put together an extensive
bibliography of what has already been written on the subject. You would figure out what the key
questions in the field were: do media images affect teens’ behavior or not, and how can anyone
tell? You might interview some of the leading researchers in the area and tell us what they say.
You’ll certainly want to read the most important books/articles on your subject. A paper is not
required; instead, students will present their findings to the class during our last three sessions.

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Journalism & Society: Minorities in the Media

Thursday 1:00p-3:30p

Pamela Newkirk

Journalism & Society: Minorities in the Media

Instructor: Pamela Newkirk

Course ID: JOUR-UA 503, section 002

Days: Thursday 1:00p-3:30p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

It has been 40 years since President Johnson’s National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders released its findings on the civil unrest that erupted in urban areas across the nation. The panel, commonly referred to as the Kerner Commission, concluded that we are living in two nations, “black, white, separate and unequal,” and devoted an entire chapter to the impact the media had on the nation’s race relations. “We believe that the media have thus far failed to report adequately on the causes and consequences of civil disorders and the underlying problems of race relations,” the report said. It added: “The media report and write from the standpoint of a white man’s world. The ills of the ghetto, the difficulties of life there, the Negro’s burning sense of grievance, are seldom conveyed.”
The report criticized as “shockingly backward” the industry’s failure to hire, train and promote African Americans. At the time, fewer than five percent of the newsroom jobs in the United States were held by African Americans. Today, despite the progress that’s been made in the hiring and coverage of African Americans and other so-called minorities, many critics say that the Kerner Report findings continue to resonate today. With the report as a backdrop, we will examine the portrayals of racial and ethnic minorities in the media, paying particular attention to African Americans – the subject of the Kerner Report – but also others, including Latinos, Asians, women, and gays and lesbians.

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Journalism & Society: Covering the Earth

Wednesday 10:00p-12:30

Dan Fagin

Journalism & Society: Covering the Earth

Instructor: Dan Fagin

Course ID: JOUR-UA 503, section 003

Days: Wednesday 10:00p-12:30

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

Environmental journalism is hot again, and not only because the climate is warming – though that helps. As web-based platforms increasingly dominate mass media, what specific forms should the “new” environmental journalism take? This class will begin by tracing the development of traditional environmental journalism from John Muir to John McPhee and will then look closely at how the field is adapting to a fast-changing media landscape. With the help of guests and timely readings, we will confront thorny questions about environmental advocacy, citizen media, issue framing, risk balancing and the scientific process. And yes, we will produce stories that matter on the biggest news beat of all. This advanced seminar will include intensive journalistic writing assignments, as well as extensive readings for in-class discussion.

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Journalism as Literature: Learning from the Best to be the Best

Tues 11:00a-1:30p

Michael Norman

Journalism as Literature: Learning from the Best to be the Best

Instructor: Michael Norman

Course ID: JOUR-UA 504, section 001

Days: Tues 11:00a-1:30p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

Learning from The Best To Be The Best is a survey of some of the most entertaining and well-written literary journalism of the last two centuries. We will read these articles and book excerpts carefully - "deep reading," it is called - to discover how good writers take basic journalism and enliven it with literary technique. We want to catalog as much of that technique and structure as we can so that we can "steal it," appropriate the devices for our own work. Students will work in teams; each week a team will "present" the readings and incite a discussion with the rest of the class. There will be some three to five formal academic papers in which students will be asked to demonstrate their understanding of the material, and there will be a number of "creative" assignments as well. The main text for the course is an excellent anthology of non-fiction: The Art of Fact by Kerrane and Yagoda..

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Journalism as Literature:

Wed 2:00p-4:30p

Pamela Newkirk

Journalism as Literature:

Instructor: Pamela Newkirk

Course ID: JOUR-UA 504, section 001

Days: Wed 2:00p-4:30p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

In this class we will survey the landscape of literary journalism through a
close reading of worlcs by some of the masters of the craft ikom Charles
Diclcens and Jonathan Swift, to Ernie Pyle, Ernest Hemingway and John
Hershey. Through a close reading of their work we will uncover some of the
literary devices -- including simile, metaphor, all~terationa nd allegory -- that
they applied to their work. By explicating the text we will begin to uncover
a series of literary strategies that writers have uscd to produce memorably
evocative works of journalism. Each student will lead at least one class
discussion on an assigned writer and his or her work.

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Issues and Ideas - Reporting in the Line of Fire: Issues in Covering the Middle East

Mon 3:40-6:30

Mohamad Bazzi

Issues and Ideas - Reporting in the Line of Fire: Issues in Covering the Middle East

Instructor: Mohamad Bazzi

Course ID: JOUR-UA 505, section 001

Days: Mon 3:40-6:30

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

The Middle East is in the headlines every day. But the coverage is often bewildering, focusing on the latest death toll in Iraq, a terrorist bombing, or an ongoing political crisis. There is little historical or political context in most of this coverage.

This course will provide students with an understanding of contemporary issues in the Middle East (such as the rise of militant Islam; the roots of Sunni-Shia tension; the failure of Arab nationalism; terrorism versus national resistance; the problem of the nation-state) by reading works that combine history, political analysis, and narrative journalism. This historical and political background will help students to eventually write about the region with depth and nuance, and to evaluate the coverage that they read.

We will also discuss the challenges of reporting from a region with competing narratives, authoritarian regimes that have little respect for a free press, and places where journalists must work under constant danger. We will have occasional guest speakers who have worked as foreign correspondents or editors managing coverage of the region.

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Internship

Fri 1:00pm - 3:00pm

Sylvan Solloway

Internship

Instructor: Sylvan Solloway

Course ID: V54.0980

Days: Fri 1:00pm - 3:00pm

Room: TBA

DECLARED JOURNALISM MAJORS ONLY Hours Arranged

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry, The Beat

To enroll:
1) Students must be declared journalism majors who have been offered an internship. The Career Services director must approve the internship. All sophomores must consult the director before applying for a credit internship.
2) No credit will be given for internships in advertising, marketing, public relations or the fashion/accessory closet.
3) Students may take the course for 1, 2, 3 or 4 credits but can earn no more than 4 credits total while attending the institute. Only one internship for credit is allowed per semester.

 

For moew information go to the Career Services section.

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Honors - Broadcast, Multimedia & Print Convergence

Fri. 10:00am-12:30pm

Jason Samuels

Honors - Broadcast, Multimedia & Print Convergence

Instructor: Jason Samuels

Course ID: JOUR-UA 351.01

Days: Fri. 10:00am-12:30pm

Room: 20 Cooper, 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

SENIORS ONLY

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry, The Beat

Honors is a year-long research, writing and reporting course for seniors in which students choose and develop a senior thesis subject of their own choosing in the first semester and complete the project in the second. Students take Honors Advanced Reporting, followed by Honors Senior Seminar. Honors students must have a 3.65 average.

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Honors - Print Long Form Bias

Mon. 1:00-pm-3:30pm

Katie Roiphe

Honors - Print Long Form Bias

Instructor: Katie Roiphe

Course ID: JOUR-UA 351.02

Days: Mon. 1:00-pm-3:30pm

Room: 20 Cooper, 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

SENIORS ONLY

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry, The Beat

Honors is a year-long research, writing and reporting course for seniors in which students choose and develop a senior thesis subject of their own choosing in the first semester and complete the project in the second. Students take Honors Advanced Reporting, followed by Honors Senior Seminar. Honors students must have a 3.65 average.

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Topics in Media Criticism: The Rise of Participatory Media

Tues 12:30p-3:00p

Clay Shirky

Topics in Media Criticism: The Rise of Participatory Media

Instructor: Clay Shirky

Course ID: JOUR-UA 622, section 001

Days: Tues 12:30p-3:00p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

Making words and images public used to be difficult, complex, and
expensive. Now it's not. That change, simple but fundamental, is
transforming a world populated by professional media makers and a
silent public into one where anyone who has a phone or a computer can
be both producer and consumer. This course will cover the history and
economics of the previous media landscape, the design of digital
networks that upend those historical systems, and new modes of
participation from weblogs and wikis and Twitter to fan fiction and
lolcats. The class will consist of class discussion around readings
and lectures, in-class presentations and analysis of new uses of media
that you observe (or participate in) outside class. There will be
several short written analyses of the media landscape, and one final
paper, all to be shared on the class blog.

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Elective Reporting Topics: Data Journalism and Investigative Reporting

Wednesday 11:00a-1:30p

Charles Seife

Elective Reporting Topics: Data Journalism and Investigative Reporting

Instructor: Charles Seife

Course ID: JOUR-UA 204, section 001

Days: Wednesday 11:00a-1:30p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

This four-point course will both survey what the emerging field of data journalism is about and plunge students into the practice of it.  Students will learn how to find useful documents and other sources of data, extract meaningful information from large data sets, prepare data for public use, and make it possible for consumers of the news to interact with the data. They will also learn how to use data to perform investigative journalism. Outstanding examples of data journalism from around the world will be studied -- and the techniques those pieces used will be added to students' arsenals. A final project will test students’ skills in using data to produce publishable-quality journalism.  

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Advanced Individualized Study

TBA

TBA

Advanced Individualized Study

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 997

Days: TBA

Room: TBA

To enroll in Advanced Individualized Study, an interested student must find a full-time faculty member to be a sponsor and then must develop and file a syllabus. The syllabus must be approved by the faculty member and the Journalism Director of Undergraduate Graduate Studies (DUGS). It must list, in week by week fashion, all readings and all writing assignments that the student will undertake for the Advanced Individualized Study. Once approved, this syllabus constitutes your "contract" on the project and the student's work will be judged and graded with that in mind.

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Investigating Journalism (lecture)

Tues/Thur 11:00-12:15

Mitchell Stephens

Investigating Journalism (lecture)

Instructor: Mitchell Stephens

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 001

Days: Tues/Thur 11:00-12:15

Room: Schimmel Auditorium

» Syllabus (PDF)

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

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Investigating Journalism Recitation

Tues 8:00am-9:15

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 002

Days: Tues 8:00am-9:15

Room: 20 Cooper, Room 653

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Tues 9:30am-10:45

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 003

Days: Tues 9:30am-10:45

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 4:55p - 6:10p

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 004

Days: Wed 4:55p - 6:10p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 659

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 6:20p - 7:35p

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 005

Days: Wed 6:20p - 7:35p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 659

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thurs 8:00a-9:15a

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 006

Days: Thurs 8:00a-9:15a

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 8:00a-9:15a

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 007

Days: Wed 8:00a-9:15a

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 9:30a-10:45a

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 008

Days: Wed 9:30a-10:45a

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 8:00a-9:15a

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 009

Days: Wed 8:00a-9:15a

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thurs 4:55p-6:10p

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 010

Days: Thurs 4:55p-6:10p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 6:20p-7:35p

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 011

Days: Wed 6:20p-7:35p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thurs 8:00a-9:15a

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 012

Days: Thurs 8:00a-9:15a

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thurs 4:00p - 5:15p

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 015

Days: Thurs 4:00p - 5:15p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thurs 5:30p-6:45p

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 016

Days: Thurs 5:30p-6:45p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Fri 10:30a-11:45a

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 018

Days: Fri 10:30a-11:45a

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 652

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Journalistic Inquiry

Mon/Wed 11:00a-12:50p

Lambeth Hochwald

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Lambeth Hochwald

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101, Section 002

Days: Mon/Wed 11:00a-12:50p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.

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Journalistic Inquiry

Tues/Thur 12:50p - 2:40

Fran Stern

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Fran Stern

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101, Section 004

Days: Tues/Thur 12:50p - 2:40

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.

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The objective of JI is to train students in the principles and practices of professional journalism. Regardless of the medium, journalists share professional ethics and standards. To inform the public – whether a readership or broadcast audience – you need to communicate clearly and concisely.

Good writing is grounded in logical thinking, solid research and comprehensive reporting. Before putting fingers to keyboard, or voice to recorder, or face to video, you need to fully understand all aspects of a story and their impact. JI will teach you to research the elements of a story, gather facts, and analyze data and information from various angles and perspectives. You will learn how to prepare for and conduct interviews and how to use quotes to inform and illustrate your stories. You will learn how to write well organized stories under deadline pressure.

Essential to the role of the reporter is the skill known as news judgment. What is news? What is the lead of the story? What are the essential elements of a story? Throughout the course, you will gain insight into how these decisions are made and how to apply professional judgment to your work.

Through classroom discussion and in-class and out-of-class assignments, you will apply these skills across platforms: print, broadcast and online. You will learn of the similar substance but different writing and production styles of the news media.

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The Beat: Covering Gen Y aka Quarterlifers

Tues 2:00p-5:40p

Mary W. Quigley

The Beat: Covering Gen Y aka Quarterlifers

Instructor: Mary W. Quigley

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201, Section 001

Days: Tues 2:00p-5:40p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

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Relationships: transformed.  Professions: redefined. Technology: exploding. Privacy: what privacy? The future: a world where time-honored maps and models have become useless.

 Fascinating stuff to think and write about, and who better than you, to do it?  You are GenY, the 80 million people aged 18-30, the first generation with a completely digital take on living. 

“Emerging adults” have become a hot topic in both the media and academia:  Boomerang kids who move back home after graduation, quarter-life crises about careers—or lack thereof, postponing long-term relationships, sexual economics, wanting more time to play before “settling down,” looking for emotional as well as economic payoff from a career, and more.

 In "Covering Gen Y," we will examine such issues as romantic, family and community relationships, the world of work, religion and spirituality, the impact of technology, lifestyles,and... well, you decide. You will write for the class website http://genyu.net/ and your individual beat blog, and be guided in doing a multimedia final project.

Last time around several class pieces got published including one by a student who went on a “technology diet”  and another’s lament about her mother wanting to friend her on Facebook.

Prof. Mary Quigley writes and blogs about Gen Y issues.

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The Beat: Foreign Reporting from NYC

Tues 3:10p - 6:50p

Mohamad Bazzi

The Beat: Foreign Reporting from NYC

Instructor: Mohamad Bazzi

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201, Section 002

Days: Tues 3:10p - 6:50p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

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This course will teach you the fundamentals of international news reporting and writing. You will learn to write clearly and concisely, and to produce news stories on deadline. These are skills you will need to master no matter what medium you work in—newspapers, websites, magazines, TV or radio—and whether you aspire to report on local, national or international topics.

 

Throughout the course, we will focus on news and beat reporting because they are the backbone of journalism. We will learn by doing, with reporting and writing assignments inside and outside class. Our lab will be New York City, which is rich in stories that can challenge the most seasoned reporters. We will focus on story organization, interview techniques, developing sources, research methods, and grammar and style. Through classroom discussions, field trips and guest speakers, we will explore journalistic practices and how they are changing. We will discuss news judgment, ethical standards, fairness and balance, writing for different audiences, and the role of journalists in society. We will also discuss the challenges facing foreign correspondents today and how the news industry can sustain international reporting at a time of great upheaval in the media.

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The Beat: Metro Desk

Wed 9:30a-1:10pm

Frankie Edozien

The Beat: Metro Desk

Instructor: Frankie Edozien

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201, Section 003

Days: Wed 9:30a-1:10pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

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All semester long we will cover New York City from Riverdale to Far Rockaway.  It’s government, its budgets, its elections its restaurants, courts, neighborhoods, healthcare, all are part of our portfolio.

From Day 1, we are metro reporters who will hone our craft covering the biggest and most vibrant municipality in the nation. You will learn to research report and write authoritatively on New York City and all its problems and issues.

This is not a lecture class per se, so you will be out covering stories all over the Big Apple and then bringing them back to write on deadline. I will stress the news feature which will require a good amount of reporting before a piece is turned in but don’t be surprised if you are asked to go cover something on our beat on deadline.

You will sharpen your interviewing techniques and learn to follow up breaking news with insightful analytical pieces to go to the heart of the issue.  You will develop a keen eye for detail and your copy must reflect the details of each piece so readers are transported to the scene through your writing.

To be an effective metro reporter you must be a local news junkie, so scouring the big dailies is a must for this class, hence the New York Times, New York Daily News and the New York Post are must-reads before class. In addition to the free papers like AM New York and Metro.

[x] close.

The Beat: Hyphenated New York

Thur 2:50p-6:30p

Vivien Orbach-Smith

The Beat: Hyphenated New York

Instructor: Vivien Orbach-Smith

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201, Section 004

Days: Thur 2:50p-6:30p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

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Many New Yorkers live in two worlds: the cultures that spawned them, and the international city they call home. In this intensive skills course, you will zero in on a neighborhood/community in which New Yorkers determinedly straddle and embrace dual identities, bringing vibrancy and diversity to this city. You may cover your chosen beat through a variety of lenses, such as:
• Zeroing in on individuals who have achieved success and others who struggle;
• Profiling local institutions and businesses;
• Examining a neighborhood's/community’s historical and political underpinnings;
• Focusing on a community's or individual’s cultural/professional contributions.

Your beat may be a community defined by its residents' lands of origin (the Russians of Brighton Beach, Koreans of "Koreatown" [Manhattan], Albanians of Arthur Avenue], Indians of "Curry Row" [Manhattan], Irish of Woodlawn [Queens]), or by their race, religion, ethnicity or identity (Harlem USA, Chassidic Crown Heights, Downtown LGBT). Whether your story is about a place or an individual, an organization or an event, your writing must always capture the human side of the news- the heart of feature journalism.
You will be guided in coming up with and pursuing great, fresh story ideas within your beat, in writing four graded pieces (three shorter ones and one more in-depth final), and in finding appropriate venues to pitch them. (Getting clips – not just grades - is one of the aims of this course.) The goal here is learning how to craft strong, captivating stories featuring memorable characters and settings - with much emphasis upon resourceful newsgathering and responsible presentation of facts and events, vivid color and detail, coherent and graceful structure, and impeccable mechanics (spelling, grammar, punctuation). A key focus of your reporting and writing will be to broaden your readers’ perspective (and your own) on the cultural/ethnic/socioeconomic milieu of your subjects.
This class will provide you with opportunities to write stories that are genuinely publishable, on subjects that genuinely interest you. You will be encouraged to write creatively and gorgeously, and even to try to change the world…but your product must retain the clarity, concision and precision that were drummed into you in your basic reporting classes, stopping far short of “fan-like,” gushy prose, blinding passions, or
fictional license.

[x] close.

The Beat: New York Neighborhoods

Thur 6:20p-10:00p

Frank Flaherty

The Beat: New York Neighborhoods

Instructor: Frank Flaherty

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201, Section 005

Days: Thur 6:20p-10:00p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

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An example to make this course concrete: Like any neighborhood, Brooklyn's Park Slope has its issues: There is frantic development on its once low-rise western side. There is a growing grocery-store rivalry. There are the yuppies in their brownstones, the twentysomethings in their shared apartments, the old-timers who resent the arrivistes, and the lesbians who have created their own thriving community. There are also the teens, the offspring of the yuppies, whose Park Slope is far different from the grownups'.
Any one of these broadly defined "neighborhoods" may be grist for a great story. In this course, we will scout out such possibilities throughout Manhattan, perhaps the most fertile journalistic turf in the world. Thinking hard about what makes for rich articles, we will select one such neighborhood for each student, for which that student will essentially become the beat reporter, the correspondent. Each student will first steep himself or herself in that neighborhood, researching its past, walking its streets, interviewing its inhabitants and mining its nooks and crannies for feature stories, profiles and trend pieces.
From such reporting, the student will write four articles of varying length, from 500 to 1,500 words, that offer a journalistically professional look at varied aspects of the assigned area. If your beat is the East Village, maybe you will report on the growing tensions within a squat. If your beat is Stuyvesant Town, maybe you will write an affecting day-in-the-life story of a 90-year-old woman who has lived there for decades. If your beat is the Lower East Side, maybe you will portray the unlikely friendship between the proprietor of a hip new boutique and the wizened haberdasher next door. All topics are open, from sports to music to immigration and beyond.
As we immerse ourselves in our beats, we will hone our journalistic skills. Most classes will include a mini-lecture on a skill – story conception, interview techniques, article
organizzation and varied writing challenges, from the lead to the transition to the good -- and not so good -- uses of quotation. Occasionally, reporters from The New York Times and elsewhere will visit as guest speakers, describing how they learned these varied skills.

[x] close.

The Beat: TV-NY

Tues 3:30p - 7:10p

Joe Peyronnin

The Beat: TV-NY

Instructor: Joe Peyronnin

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201, Section 007

Days: Tues 3:30p - 7:10p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry. 

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

[x] close.

The Beat: TV-NY

Mon 6:20p - 10:00p

Adrian Mihai

The Beat: TV-NY

Instructor: Adrian Mihai

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201, Section 008

Days: Mon 6:20p - 10:00p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry. 

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

[x] close.

Advanced Reporting: The Quest

Mon 4:55 - 8:35

Jessica Seigel

Advanced Reporting: The Quest

Instructor: Jessica Seigel

Course ID: JOUR-UA 301, Section 001

Days: Mon 4:55 - 8:35

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, The Beat

This is the Capstone course. Subject matter varies from section to section, but the basic skeleton of the course is the same across sections: the emphasis is on development of the ability to produce writing and reporting within a sophisticated longform story structure. The course involves query writing, topic research and reading, interviewing, and repeated drafts and rewrites, leading to a full-length piece of writing aimed at a publishable level and the ability of the student to present the reporting orally.

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The quest is at the heart of our greatest stories, from Odysseus returning home to reporter Nellie Bly’s race around the world in less than 80 days. In this course, students plot their own journey, inspired by classics old and new. We’ll learn quest hallmarks like the role of obstacles, character, location, guides, gurus and skeptics, doubt and myth – and all-important narrative structure using present, past, future, suspense and flashback.

Students warm up for their 3,000-word magazine package in linked features that may include themes like The Place, The Guide, The Big Dare, Fish Out of Water, and In-The-Footsteps. Throughout, we’ll work on balancing first with third person, detailed reporting with personal experience -- all while finding your authentic voice. Past student seekers have learned to motorcycle, studied stand-up comedy, overcome an addiction, lived with the homeless and hunted literary and historic myths from J.D. Salinger’s New York to hidden Grand Central Station. What’s your Holy Grail? In this class, you may find it.

THE QUEST SPIRIT: This semester, we will pursue group and individual odysseys. It is crucial that everyone participate in both. In that spirit, you will be asked to set your personal goals for the semester in writing. You will also be asked to actively contribute and shape how we move forward as a group. This is an experimental, first-time format blending ancient and modern literature with contemporary journalism, so everyone will be asked to row on our maiden voyage.

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Advanced Reporting: Digital Culture

Wed 10:00-1:40

TBA

Advanced Reporting: Digital Culture

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 301, Section 002

Days: Wed 10:00-1:40

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, The Beat

This is the Capstone course. Subject matter varies from section to section, but the basic skeleton of the course is the same across sections: the emphasis is on development of the ability to produce writing and reporting within a sophisticated longform story structure. The course involves query writing, topic research and reading, interviewing, and repeated drafts and rewrites, leading to a full-length piece of writing aimed at a publishable level and the ability of the student to present the reporting orally.

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From Facebook to Guitar Hero, digital culture is rapidly transforming our world.  It’s also a burgeoning new beat for journalists.  This course covers the essentials of chronicling this field, but the basics are applicable in anything you write.  You’ll learn to apply your skills of observation and analysis to fast-moving targets:   social networks, videogames, futurists, Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, bloggers, hackers, and more.  The subject matter is wonderfully varied, from the arts to business to science.  As an editor at the New York Times once told me, “You can write about anything – as long as there’s a chip in it.”

In addition to reading and discussions, you’ll write three stories of your own. We'll explore the process of getting your articles into print.  This includes:  generating ideas, writing query letters, working with editors, conducting research and interviews, organizing features, and revising drafts

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Advanced Reporting: Immigration in New York City

Wed 11:00-2:40

Yvonne Latty

Advanced Reporting: Immigration in New York City

Instructor: Yvonne Latty

Course ID: JOUR-UA 301, Section 002

Days: Wed 11:00-2:40

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, The Beat

This is the Capstone course. Subject matter varies from section to section, but the basic skeleton of the course is the same across sections: the emphasis is on development of the ability to produce writing and reporting within a sophisticated longform story structure. The course involves query writing, topic research and reading, interviewing, and repeated drafts and rewrites, leading to a full-length piece of writing aimed at a publishable level and the ability of the student to present the reporting orally.

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About 40 percent of the city’s population are immigrants. They make up a big part of the city’s workforce and are crucial to its survival. Immigrants often live in two worlds. Their day-to-day lives are in their newly adopted country, but their minds and hearts are often in their native land. Entire neighborhoods resemble those countries more than our own. They are vibrant, colorful, neighborhoods that we will explore. We will also look at the many challenges they face. We will use all the tools a journalist has to explore immigrant communities and issues. We will look at the census to mine for stories that are not being told. We will read about immigration and have guest speakers, but we will experience what immigration means to this city and its people by immersing ourselves in this often-controversial topic. We will spend a lot of time in their communities.

Students will have the option to work in long form video or print. There will be training available for print students to do a long video piece as well as an option to learn multimedia techniques. But this is a capstone course, which will require either a 7-minute video or 3000 word capstone piece.

 

 


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Advanced Reporting: Hidden New York: Where the Wild Things Are

Wed 5:30p-9:10p

Keith Kloor

Advanced Reporting: Hidden New York: Where the Wild Things Are

Instructor: Keith Kloor

Course ID: JOUR-UA 301, Section 004

Days: Wed 5:30p-9:10p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, The Beat

This is the Capstone course. Subject matter varies from section to section, but the basic skeleton of the course is the same across sections: the emphasis is on development of the ability to produce writing and reporting within a sophisticated longform story structure. The course involves query writing, topic research and reading, interviewing, and repeated drafts and rewrites, leading to a full-length piece of writing aimed at a publishable level and the ability of the student to present the reporting orally.

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Urban nature would seem an oxymoron, especially in a densely crowded, frenetic place like New York City. Yet recent studies have shown that great concentrations of biodiversity are found in cities. How can that be?

The truth is that nature abounds in many cities, including New York. In fact, wild creatures and untamed jungles can be found in all five boroughs of New York—if you know where to look. There are hawks that dive-bomb pigeons, rare butterflies, occasional coyotes, marshes, beaches, and even old growth forests, all sharing space with eight million New Yorkers.

The city also boasts some of the earliest urban planning experiments that incorporated nature in a residential, urban environment: “Sunnyside Gardens” and “Forest Hills,” both in Queens. These innovative projects date from the early 20th century and were part of a larger movement called “Garden Cities,” which originated in England. But by the 1960s, another social movement, known as environmentalism, rose to prominence. It spawned a larger interest in ecology and advanced the notion that nature and cities were incompatible.

In recent years, however, ecologists have paid increasing attention to urban environments. For the last decade, two major, multi-disciplinary studies in Baltimore, Maryland and in Tucson, Arizona, have been cataloguing flora and fauna. Among the findings is the surprising diversity of species that have been attracted to urban micro-ecosystems. It is these hidden ecosystems in New York, where similar research is underway, that students will discover during their own reporting and research. There, they will find many opportunities for stories, uncovering the critters that have carved out a lush home in an otherwise concrete city; they will also encounter many fascinating characters that embrace this wild side of New York; and they will report on the various issues often pit nature against the city.

There will be three major writing assignments: a 750-word profile, 1,500-word mini-feature, and 3,000-word feature. Additionally, there will be a class blog for students to post short dispatches from the field. In today’s multi-platform world, journalists at newspapers and magazines are expected to write for both the print publication and the website.

There will be numerous field trips, potentially to places like Jamaica Bay, Prospect Park, and a canoe ride down the Bronx River. 

My background as an environmental journalist and NYC magazine editor will be valuable to students as we embark on our journey through New York’s wild side.  In my own reporting, I’ve written about everything from New York’s garbage history to where to find edible foods in city parks. The city’s ecology was also part of my beat when I was a senior editor at Audubon Magazine for nearly ten years.

 


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Advanced Reporting: Food Writing: The Ultimate Menu

Thur 9:00a-12:40p

Betty Ming Liu

Advanced Reporting: Food Writing: The Ultimate Menu

Instructor: Betty Ming Liu

Course ID: JOUR-UA 301, Section 005

Days: Thur 9:00a-12:40p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, The Beat

This is the Capstone course. Subject matter varies from section to section, but the basic skeleton of the course is the same across sections: the emphasis is on development of the ability to produce writing and reporting within a sophisticated longform story structure. The course involves query writing, topic research and reading, interviewing, and repeated drafts and rewrites, leading to a full-length piece of writing aimed at a publishable level and the ability of the student to present the reporting orally.

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Welcome to “Food Writing!”

Food is a powerful topic that can be accessed from every possible area of expertise. Name your passion and there is surely a food issue related to it. Food stories can be served up in countless contexts, including politics, science, fashion, religion, pop culture, history, anthropology, business, lifestyle, nutrition, art, cooking, dining, immigration, psychology, marketing, law and more.

Food for thought will definitely energize our classes throughout the semester. Expect to have a wonderful time exploring the art and craft of journalism via your noshing adventures. And since this is the capstone course for journalism majors, we are on a specific mission…

Our goal is to develop your ability to produce writing and reporting within the sophisticated long form story structure. Both our class work and homework will cover query writing, topic research and reading, interviewing.

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Advanced Reporting: Advanced TV Reporting

Thur 2:00-5:40

Marlene Sanders

Advanced Reporting: Advanced TV Reporting

Instructor: Marlene Sanders

Course ID: JOUR-UA 301, Section 006

Days: Thur 2:00-5:40

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, The Beat

This is the Capstone course. Subject matter varies from section to section, but the basic skeleton of the course is the same across sections: the emphasis is on development of the ability to produce writing and reporting within a sophisticated longform story structure. The course involves query writing, topic research and reading, interviewing, and repeated drafts and rewrites, leading to a full-length piece of writing aimed at a publishable level and the ability of the student to present the reporting orally.

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In previous classes, students have learned the rudiments of story selection, writing and shooting.  This class advances those skills, with the added pressure of meeting real deadlines; i.e., producing pieces that air on a live, weekly news broadcast.  Stories will gradually grow in complexity over the semester.

Class one. Explanation of what the students will be expected to do during the semester, including how grades will be determined.  Discussion of types of stories to be done and  how they should be researched and presented to the professor for approval.  Students are instructed to bring in story ideas by the next session.  There will be attention to interviewing skills. All story ideas must be accompanied by a list of questions to be asked.

Students are required to do 4 stories of normal length and one more complicated, longer final piece.

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Journalistic Inquiry

Mon/Wed 3:30p-5:20p

Frankie Edozien

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Frankie Edozien

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101, Section 003

Days: Mon/Wed 3:30p-5:20p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.

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Description
You are going to learn to think, act and write like a journalist.
This course will provide an introduction to the basic principles of research, reporting and writing the news. You will be introduced to a variety of ways in which we work in this fast paced, deadline driven business - from writing in the traditional newspaper pyramid style to opinion and feature writing to working for broadcast, and new media. You will do lots of writing because the only way to work on your skills is to practice it over and over.

To be a good reporter you have to be informed about what's happening in the world around you. For this class, you have to read The New York Times, New York Daily News and The New York Post every day. You must watch at least 15 minutes of television news or listen to news radio a day. You must also scan the free papers. (Metro & AM NEW YORK) Once a week you will have a brief news quiz on the big stories of the week and your score will count toward your final grade.

In each class one or two students will take turns leading "Newscheck," which is a discussion on a story of their choosing from the front pages of The New York Times. Everyone must participate in the discussion.
Working journalists will visit throughout the semester. You will be expected to ask well thought out questions and take notes because you will have to write a 600-word story on each newsroom visitor. These stories will be due the day after they are assigned.

We will start out with obits and profiles where you will learn the nuances of storytelling and build up to writing a 1,000-word final news story on an issue of your choosing. This story should be good enough to be published. You will cover news events. We will get into this city's diverse colorful neighborhoods and find stories and spend lots of time exploring and hunting down news in New York City.

If a big story breaks, prepare to cover it. On any given day in the newsroom you have no idea what is going to happen. Be flexible! I can guarantee you that things will change as we go through our semester.

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Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thurs 3:55p-5:10p

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 014

Days: Thurs 3:55p-5:10p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

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Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thurs 1:00p-2:15p

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 013

Days: Thurs 1:00p-2:15p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

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» Undergraduate Media Criticism

Topics in Media Criticism: The Rise of Participatory Media

Tues 12:30p-3:00p

Clay Shirky

Topics in Media Criticism: The Rise of Participatory Media

Instructor: Clay Shirky

Course ID: JOUR-UA 622, section 001

Days: Tues 12:30p-3:00p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

Making words and images public used to be difficult, complex, and
expensive. Now it's not. That change, simple but fundamental, is
transforming a world populated by professional media makers and a
silent public into one where anyone who has a phone or a computer can
be both producer and consumer. This course will cover the history and
economics of the previous media landscape, the design of digital
networks that upend those historical systems, and new modes of
participation from weblogs and wikis and Twitter to fan fiction and
lolcats. The class will consist of class discussion around readings
and lectures, in-class presentations and analysis of new uses of media
that you observe (or participate in) outside class. There will be
several short written analyses of the media landscape, and one final
paper, all to be shared on the class blog.

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Internship

Fri 1:00pm - 3:00pm

Sylvan Solloway

Internship

Instructor: Sylvan Solloway

Course ID: V54.0980

Days: Fri 1:00pm - 3:00pm

Room: TBA

DECLARED JOURNALISM MAJORS ONLY Hours Arranged

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry, The Beat

To enroll:
1) Students must be declared journalism majors who have been offered an internship. The Career Services director must approve the internship. All sophomores must consult the director before applying for a credit internship.
2) No credit will be given for internships in advertising, marketing, public relations or the fashion/accessory closet.
3) Students may take the course for 1, 2, 3 or 4 credits but can earn no more than 4 credits total while attending the institute. Only one internship for credit is allowed per semester.

 

For moew information go to the Career Services section.

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Journalism Seminar: The Art of Opinion Writing & Polemic

Mon 10:00a-12:30p

Katie Roiphe

Journalism Seminar: The Art of Opinion Writing & Polemic

Instructor: Katie Roiphe

Course ID: JOUR-UA 401, section 001

Days: Mon 10:00a-12:30p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

The Art of Opinion Writing & Polemic

polemic  
Etymology: French polémique, from Middle French, from polemique controversial, from Greek polemikos warlike, hostile, from polemos war; perhaps akin to Greek pelemizein to shake. 1 a : an aggressive attack on or refutation of the opinions or principles of another b : the art or practice of disputation or controversy.

How does one break into the current arena of cultural debate and internet flurries of gossip and analysis?  How does one craft a charismatic and forceful opinion piece, or a long polemic? This course will examine the art  and history of opinion writing or polemic from Milton’s Satan to Christopher Hitchens. We will closely examine the construction of great and powerful and flamboyant and splashy and cranky arguments, and learn the practical skills  involved in writing a successful op-ed or stylish contrarian piece. We will examine and analyze various kinds of authority and how one projects them. We will entertain the idea of writing an ‘unbalanced’ piece as a virtue, and discuss how one generates the crazy confidence required for bravura performance in polemic. This is both a rigorous writing and reading class;  both an academic exploration of the uses of rhetoric and a practical class in a set of skills very useful in the current marketplace.

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Advanced Individualized Study

TBA

TBA

Advanced Individualized Study

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 997

Days: TBA

Room: TBA

To enroll in Advanced Individualized Study, an interested student must find a full-time faculty member to be a sponsor and then must develop and file a syllabus. The syllabus must be approved by the faculty member and the Journalism Director of Undergraduate Graduate Studies (DUGS). It must list, in week by week fashion, all readings and all writing assignments that the student will undertake for the Advanced Individualized Study. Once approved, this syllabus constitutes your "contract" on the project and the student's work will be judged and graded with that in mind.

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Investigating Journalism (lecture)

Tues/Thur 11:00-12:15

Mitchell Stephens

Investigating Journalism (lecture)

Instructor: Mitchell Stephens

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 001

Days: Tues/Thur 11:00-12:15

Room: Schimmel Auditorium

» Syllabus (PDF)

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Tues 8:00am-9:15

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 002

Days: Tues 8:00am-9:15

Room: 20 Cooper, Room 653

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 4:55p - 6:10p

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 004

Days: Wed 4:55p - 6:10p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 659

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 6:20p - 7:35p

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 005

Days: Wed 6:20p - 7:35p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 659

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thurs 8:00a-9:15a

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 006

Days: Thurs 8:00a-9:15a

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 8:00a-9:15a

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 007

Days: Wed 8:00a-9:15a

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 9:30a-10:45a

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 008

Days: Wed 9:30a-10:45a

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 8:00a-9:15a

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 009

Days: Wed 8:00a-9:15a

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thurs 4:55p-6:10p

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 010

Days: Thurs 4:55p-6:10p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 6:20p-7:35p

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 011

Days: Wed 6:20p-7:35p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thurs 8:00a-9:15a

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 012

Days: Thurs 8:00a-9:15a

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thurs 1:00p-2:15p

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 013

Days: Thurs 1:00p-2:15p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thurs 4:00p - 5:15p

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 015

Days: Thurs 4:00p - 5:15p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

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Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thurs 5:30p-6:45p

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 016

Days: Thurs 5:30p-6:45p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Fri 9:00a-10:15a

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 017

Days: Fri 9:00a-10:15a

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 652

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Fri 10:30a-11:45a

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 018

Days: Fri 10:30a-11:45a

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 652

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

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The Beat: Media Criticism

Thur 6:00p-9:40p

Brian Cogan

The Beat: Media Criticism

Instructor: Brian Cogan

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201, Section 006

Days: Thur 6:00p-9:40p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry.  Media Criticism students only.

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

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This course will serve as an introduction to various schools of media criticism and ways in which different types of media can be interpreted. What is the traditional role of the journalist and how is it changing?  What new theoretical capacities must be analyzed in order to understand the current state of media? This course will look at early critiques of media to the present and will incorporate critical analysis form a variety of perspectives from critical discourse to ideological criticism to market and public journalism based models. While many pundits are sure that modern news media is in a state of flux, few are fully informed of earlier critiques of media from Marx to Dewey to the New Journalists of the 1960’s, each of which provided a critical lens for analyzing journalism and media. In this course through a variety of writing assignments, in-class and take home critiques, and through serious critical analysis of modern media in all of its various permutations students will analyze the ways in which media can be studied.  Ideally students will leave the class with a set of critical tools to use in analyzing mass media and the inherent difficulties facing major news organizations in all of their various permutations.

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Journalistic Inquiry

Mon/Wed 11:00a-12:50p

Lambeth Hochwald

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Lambeth Hochwald

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101, Section 002

Days: Mon/Wed 11:00a-12:50p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.

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Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thurs 3:55p-5:10p

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 014

Days: Thurs 3:55p-5:10p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Tues 9:30am-10:45

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 003

Days: Tues 9:30am-10:45

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

This course is for the serious: In this gateway to the journalism major, you will explore the significance of news and the role of the journalist from Thucydides to now. Expect to engage deeply with the news and events that shape our understanding of the journalist's primary role and continuing challenges. Expect to be challenged in the writing of six journalistic essays, built on well-supported, well-researched arguments, ranging in length from 600 to 2,500 words. The form will likely be new to you and perhaps vexing, but will prepare you well for the reporting courses to follow. The readings, lectures and guest appearances examine the historical and changing role of the journalist as democracy's watchdog. The aim is an immersion experience in the mission and romance of journalism as a profession, indeed a calling, as well as exposure to the realities journalists now face in this rapidly changing media environment.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Journalistic Inquiry

Mon/Wed 3:30p-5:20p

Frankie Edozien

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Frankie Edozien

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101, Section 003

Days: Mon/Wed 3:30p-5:20p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.

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Description
You are going to learn to think, act and write like a journalist.
This course will provide an introduction to the basic principles of research, reporting and writing the news. You will be introduced to a variety of ways in which we work in this fast paced, deadline driven business - from writing in the traditional newspaper pyramid style to opinion and feature writing to working for broadcast, and new media. You will do lots of writing because the only way to work on your skills is to practice it over and over.

To be a good reporter you have to be informed about what's happening in the world around you. For this class, you have to read The New York Times, New York Daily News and The New York Post every day. You must watch at least 15 minutes of television news or listen to news radio a day. You must also scan the free papers. (Metro & AM NEW YORK) Once a week you will have a brief news quiz on the big stories of the week and your score will count toward your final grade.

In each class one or two students will take turns leading "Newscheck," which is a discussion on a story of their choosing from the front pages of The New York Times. Everyone must participate in the discussion.
Working journalists will visit throughout the semester. You will be expected to ask well thought out questions and take notes because you will have to write a 600-word story on each newsroom visitor. These stories will be due the day after they are assigned.

We will start out with obits and profiles where you will learn the nuances of storytelling and build up to writing a 1,000-word final news story on an issue of your choosing. This story should be good enough to be published. You will cover news events. We will get into this city's diverse colorful neighborhoods and find stories and spend lots of time exploring and hunting down news in New York City.

If a big story breaks, prepare to cover it. On any given day in the newsroom you have no idea what is going to happen. Be flexible! I can guarantee you that things will change as we go through our semester.

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Journalistic Inquiry

Tues/Thur 12:50p - 2:40

Fran Stern

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Fran Stern

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101, Section 004

Days: Tues/Thur 12:50p - 2:40

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.

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The objective of JI is to train students in the principles and practices of professional journalism. Regardless of the medium, journalists share professional ethics and standards. To inform the public – whether a readership or broadcast audience – you need to communicate clearly and concisely.

Good writing is grounded in logical thinking, solid research and comprehensive reporting. Before putting fingers to keyboard, or voice to recorder, or face to video, you need to fully understand all aspects of a story and their impact. JI will teach you to research the elements of a story, gather facts, and analyze data and information from various angles and perspectives. You will learn how to prepare for and conduct interviews and how to use quotes to inform and illustrate your stories. You will learn how to write well organized stories under deadline pressure.

Essential to the role of the reporter is the skill known as news judgment. What is news? What is the lead of the story? What are the essential elements of a story? Throughout the course, you will gain insight into how these decisions are made and how to apply professional judgment to your work.

Through classroom discussion and in-class and out-of-class assignments, you will apply these skills across platforms: print, broadcast and online. You will learn of the similar substance but different writing and production styles of the news media.

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» Business and Economic Reporting

Law & Mass Communication

M, 1-3:30pm

Stephen D. Solomon

Law & Mass Communication

Instructor: Stephen D. Solomon

Course ID: JOUR-GA 0011.003

Days: M, 1-3:30pm

Room: 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

Although the First Amendment appears on its face to prohibit any governmental restrictions on the press, the U.S. Supreme Court in fact balances free and open expression against other vital interests of society. This course begins by examining the struggle against seditious libel (the crime of criticizing government or its officials) that was not won in this country until the landmark decision in New York Times v. Sullivan in 1964. Students will examine freedom of the press through the prism of a rich variety of contemporary conflicts, including libel, newsgathering problems, the right of privacy, prior restraint, and the conflict between free press and fair trial. Readings include a The First Amendment and the Fourth Estate; Make No Law by Anthony Lewis, The Unwanted Gaze by Jeffrey Rosen, and Origins of the Bill of Rights by Leonard Levy. Students write five papers during the semester.

 

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WRR I - BER

T, 8:30am-2:20pm

Adam L. Penenberg

WRR I - BER

Instructor: Adam L. Penenberg

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.001

Days: T, 8:30am-2:20pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

Writing, Research & Reporting I: BER is designed to teach the basic skills you'll need to write news stories for business publications. You'll learn everything from how to write on a daily (or even hourly) deadline for newspapers and wire services to penning short pieces for magazines. The emphasis will be on learning by doing, with regular reporting and writing assignments inside and outside of class. We'll workshop your stories in class, dissect current media coverage, take field trips to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Conference Board and New York Stock Exchange, and analyze the merit and structure of good (and bad) news stories. You'll be expected to stay abreast of the news, and to read The New York Times and Wall Street Journal regularly, as well as a number of business magazines (Fortune, Forbes, BusinessWeek, etc.) and websites. By the end of the semester, you should be able to write snappy ledes and smart nut grafs in your sleep—the first step in becoming a first rate journalist—and have the requisite skills to write tight, informative business stories. (Note: WRII covers longer magazine features.) In addition, we'll be working closely with the Internship Director to prepare you for landing a quality internship.

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Hyperlocal Newsroom Section 2 - see Electives below

F, 1-4:40pm

TBA

Hyperlocal Newsroom Section 2 - see Electives below

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1080.002

Days: F, 1-4:40pm

Room: 654

See course description listed under Electives.

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Fieldwork - BER

TBA

TBA

Fieldwork - BER

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1290.002

Days: TBA

Room: TBA

See instructor for more details.

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» Cultural Reporting and Criticism

WRRI - CRC

F, 9am-2pm

TBA

WRRI - CRC

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.007

Days: F, 9am-2pm

Room: 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

This is the introductory reporting, research and journalistic writing course for CRC students, teaching cultural journalists the skills and conventions of news and feature reporting for print and multimedia. Students receive short- and long-form reporting assignments with intensive rewriting, and basic training in radio production. Open to CRC students only.

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Critical Survey

W, 1:30-5:10pm

Dennis Lim

Critical Survey

Instructor: Dennis Lim

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1184.001

Days: W, 1:30-5:10pm

Room: 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

This is a course in reading and writing criticism. Our goal is to introduce ourselves to some of the best cultural critics (mainly of the 20th century); chart the ways in which the nature of 20th-century criticism — and art — have changed; investigate some of the major questions that preoccupy contemporary critics (especially the nature of modernism/postmodernism, high and low culture, irony and sincerity, and the culture wars); and begin to master some forms of critical writing. The paradox of how to develop a critical voice without writing directly about oneself will be explored. Among the critics we'll study are James Agee, Pauline Kael, John Berger, George Orwell, Gilbert Seldes, Susan Sontag, Lionel Trilling, Greil Marcus, Albert Murray, Norman Mailer and Wendy Steiner. Open to CRC students only.

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Cultural Conversation

T, 2-6PM

Susie Linfield

Cultural Conversation

Instructor: Susie Linfield

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1181.001

Days: T, 2-6PM

Room: 7th Floor Library

» Syllabus (PDF)

The primary purpose of this course is to inculcate habits of thinking that are vital to informed and intelligent cultural reporting and criticism. This does not mean that students will be taught "theories" of cultural writing, which they can then apply to their "practice." Rather, the point is that your thought process-as you write a piece, as you prepare to write it, or even before that, as you go through your daily life in a world full of potential subject matter-is an integral part of your work as a writer. We all carry on some kind of conversation with ourselves, and with the people we know, about the culture we live in. As writers, however, our task is to self-consciously translate that private conversation into a public one that connects with readers. In this course I ask you to address two questions that bear on this translation. One is historical: what has been said in the cultural conversation before you came to it? To find your place in the conversation (just as you would have to do if you joined a roomful of people talking) you will need to grapple with cultural issues and debates that go back half a century-debates about the nature of art and criticism, technology and mass media, high culture versus mass culture, art and politics, social groups and cultural difference. The second question is personal: what experiences, ideas, emotions, and prejudices do you bring to the conversation? While conventional news writers are simply expected to put their own attitudes aside, cultural journalists must be conscious of their standpoint and its impact on their observation and judgment. Your credibility and the power of your literary voice depend a good deal on your ability to develop this capacity for self-reflection. Open to CRC students only.

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Writing Social Commentary

F, 9am-12:40pm

Jason Maloney

Writing Social Commentary

Instructor: Jason Maloney

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1186.001

Days: F, 9am-12:40pm

Room: 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

The primary goal of this class is to help students bridge the gap between passion and reason in the writing of social commentary. Just as a lawyer acts as an advocate while laying out a persuasive case, the writer who undertakes a piece of social commentary -- whether a piece of criticism, a review, or a polemic -- must be able to present a case while being aware of potential inconsistencies in logic. To do that, we must first recognize that we can agree with the aims of a piece of writing and reject its reasoning, or reject a writer's conclusions while admiring the way the writer has arrived there. Our purpose will not be boring evenhandedness but the ability to make a strong, convincing argument free of  cant and cliché. Though you will be relying on facts just as a reporter does, you will be required to bring the very things a reporter is trained to exclude: your opinion, an awareness of your prejudices, and the way you have been shaped by your experience. Social commentary should not be memoir by stealth but it can be a way of writing about what is most important to you while turning your gaze outward.

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Topics in Cultural Journalism

W, 3-7pm

Susie Linfield

Topics in Cultural Journalism

Instructor: Susie Linfield

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1281.001

Days: W, 3-7pm

Room: 7th Floor Library

TBA

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Reporting the Arts

R, 9:30am-1:10pm

Dennis Lim

Reporting the Arts

Instructor: Dennis Lim

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.008

Days: R, 9:30am-1:10pm

Room: 7th Floor Library

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course will focus on the skills and techniques essential to arts reporting and criticism. By the end of the semester, students will have produced a substantial and varied body of arts journalism. You will learn to express insights and formulate arguments concisely through a series of writing assignments and a collective class blog that will report on and respond to current cultural events. You will also work on two in-depth reported pieces a profile and a piece on a cultural scene or phenomenon that will provide an opportunity to synthesize a critical sensibility with research, interviewing, and reporting techniques. We will read a wide range of arts critics and reporters, including Joan Acocella; Ken Auletta; Peter Biskind; Joan Didion; J. Hoberman; John Leonard; Janet Malcolm; David Remnick; Susan Sontag; David Foster Wallace; Edmund Wilson; and James Wood. CRC students will be given priority; open to others after CRC enrollment with permission of the instructor.

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» Global and Joint Program Studies

WRRI - GloJo

F, 11am-2:40pm

Barbara Borst

WRRI - GloJo

Instructor: Barbara Borst

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.008

Days: F, 11am-2:40pm

Room: 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course will teach you the fundamentals of news reporting and writing. You will learn to write clearly and concisely, and to produce news stories on deadline. These are skills you will need to master no matter what medium you work in-newspapers, websites, magazines, TV or radio-and whether you aspire to report on local, national or international topics. During this first half of a two-semester course, we will focus on news and beat reporting because they are the backbone of journalism. We will learn by doing, with reporting and writing assignments inside and outside class. Our lab will be New York City, which is rich in stories that can challenge the most seasoned reporters. We will begin by learning the basics of news reporting: story organization, interview techniques, developing sources, research methods, and grammar and style. Through classroom discussions, field trips and guest speakers, we will explore journalistic practices and how they are changing.

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» Literary Reportage

Introduction to LitRep

W, 11:30am-2:30pm

Robert S. Boynton

Introduction to LitRep

Instructor: Robert S. Boynton

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.010

Days: W, 11:30am-2:30pm

Room: 7th Floor Library

» Syllabus (PDF)

The goal of this course is to help you create a distinctive body of work and, eventually, a capstone piece of literary reportage. It has three basic components. First, it will guide you through the research, reporting and thinking to refine and focus the project you will begin in Portfolio I. Second, it will introduce you to some of the authors, editors and publications of the genre. Third, it will familiarize you with some of the journalistic strategies you will use in your own work.

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How Books are Built: The Basics of NonFiction Narrative

T, 3:30-7pm

Michael Norman

How Books are Built: The Basics of NonFiction Narrative

Instructor: Michael Norman

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1050.001

Days: T, 3:30-7pm

Room: 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

This is a lively seminar about the most difficult aspect of book writing: How to structure a narrative. Through careful reading and exercises, we will attempt to discover how fine non-fiction books are made. We will read five book-length narratives (among them Praying for Sheetrock by Melissa Faye Greene, and The Duke of Deception by Geoff Wolf) then take those books apart, chapter by chapter, to discover what material the writer collected, how and why the writer organized that material and, finally, what structure the writer used to create a compelling narrative that attempts to hold the reader from first page to last. Seminar members, working in teams with protocols supplied by the instructor, will "present" the books for analysis and lead a discussion of them.

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WRRI - LitRep

M, 11am-4:50pm

TBA

WRRI - LitRep

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.010

Days: M, 11am-4:50pm

Room: 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

This one-semester course, a keystone of the Literary Reportage program, develops students as rigorous, curious observers of the world, arming them with the tools to become resourceful reporters and literary journalistic writers of precision, originality, and flair. Specifically, we’ll focus on 360 Degree Reporting: doing background/orbit research on a subject, coming up with varied and informative secondary subjects, covering the subject’s environment—and pay particular attention to the art of the interview. We’ll determine how to find a good story and tell it engagingly (addressing those crucial “what’s the point?” and “who cares?” questions), train in gathering information doggedly and thoughtfully, examine journalistic ethics, and generally learn the nuts and bolts of the profile form—all in an effort to most vividly and authentically bring our subjects to life on the page.  
            The general structure of the six-hour weekly class will be roughly half the time in the classroom—for lectures, discussions, guest speakers, in-class exercises, workshops—and half in the field reporting on assignment (sometimes solo, sometimes together) and visiting Alexa Pearce at Bobst for research instruction. Most weeks, we’ll return to the classroom to discuss our reporting experiences and often to begin crafting from the information we’ve gathered, on the spot. The emphasis here is on the questions—which ones to ask, and in what way—as much as the answers.

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Portfolio

M, 3-6pm

Robert S. Boynton

Portfolio

Instructor: Robert S. Boynton

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.001

Days: M, 3-6pm

Room: 7th Floor Library

» Syllabus (PDF)

The NYU Portfolio Program is designed to educate journalists in a way that is both conservative and revolutionary: Conservative in that it emphasizes knowledge of various journalistic traditions, basic literary skills, and practical outcomes (aka getting published) and revolutionary in that we are going to pursue these goals without primary emphasis on the "boot-camp" model ("skills" courses, "content" courses, etc.) that has dominated journalism education for the last half century. By invitation, we encourage and enable a select group of students to use their NYU Journalism Department experience to develop a coherent, sophisticated body of work.

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» Magazine Writing

Storied New York

T, 9-11:30am

Suketu Mehta

Storied New York

Instructor: Suketu Mehta

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1023.001

Days: T, 9-11:30am

Room: 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

New York is the most storied city in America; generations of writers have been entranced by it, and have produced masterpieces in tribute. We will look at the city as a character, in journalism, memoir, fiction, poetry, and film. What is the idea of New York in historical and contemporary imagination, and how different or similar are today's chroniclers of the city from their predecessors? What can we learn about urban reportage from the best practitioners of the genre? We will examine the texts for thematic concerns as well as those of craft. We will look at them as a car mechanic looks at a car; see how sentences are structured so that the text provides pleasure as well as information. And along the way, we will discover the broader possibilities and limitations of nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and film.

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Law & Mass Communication

M, 6:20-8:50pm

George Freeman

Law & Mass Communication

Instructor: George Freeman

Course ID: JOUR-GA 0011.001

Days: M, 6:20-8:50pm

Room: 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course is designed to acquaint students with the basic protections and restrictions of the law as they apply to the media, as well as the ethical problems and dilemmas journalists face. First Amendment rights and legal and ethical responsibilities and limitations will be examined and discussed. The course will look at these questions from five viewpoints: from (i) the practical view of a journalist doing his job with (ii) heavy consideration of ethical imperatives, and (iii) from a legal prospective, all the while (iv) considering the rules in a public policy context -- are they fair and appropriate in our society? -- while (v) noting the historical context in which they arise. Significant court cases and fundamental legal rules as well as past ethical scandals and issues will be explored in the context of political and historical realities, and in terms of journalistic standards and practices; contemporary media law issues and ethical problems and guidelines will also be focused on. Among the basic First Amendment issues which will be examined are libel, invasion of privacy, prior restraints, newsgathering and newsgathering torts, and the reporter's privilege; some of the ethical issues to be explored include objectivity in reporting, bias and transparency, conflicts of interest, and fair dealings with subjects, sources and advertisers.

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WRRI - Magazine

R, 10am-3:50pm

Mary W. Quigley

WRRI - Magazine

Instructor: Mary W. Quigley

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.003

Days: R, 10am-3:50pm

Room: 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

This is a professional course, concentrating on the basics of the craft of journalism — coming up with an idea, getting it approved, reporting the facts, organizing the material and writing the story. Students will spend a lot of time looking for story ideas, and pitching them — a critical part of the real-world newsroom experience. Perhaps the biggest emphasis of the class will be on the most important part of journalism: gathering the facts. Students will have many reporting exercises during in-class drill sessions, but will also do a great deal of "live" street reporting. We will rely much more on primary sources — original documents, and especially what people tell us — rather than secondary sources that are better suited for the background that sends us to primary sources.

In drills and in the stories produced outside of class, students will learn the classic styles of organizing and writing, and will begin learning what works best for them on different types of stories. We'll read and analyze many examples of the day's news, looking at what works, what doesn't and why. We'll look at what gets covered, what doesn't, and the impact of both. The ethics of journalism will be a constant undercurrent for all our work and discussions.

In addition to exercises produced during drill sessions, students will do a number of street-reporting assignments. Possible story ideas might cover some aspect of a city agency, the courts, police, the arts, culture, business and sports. The story assignments are not merely drills; goal is to produce stories that can be published. (new paragraph)This class aims to lay the foundation for a career in journalism, extremely challenging but extremely stimulating, with the focus always on best practices for the communications professional in the 21st century.

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WRRI - Magazine

R, 10am-3:50pm

Meryl Gordon

WRRI - Magazine

Instructor: Meryl Gordon

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.002

Days: R, 10am-3:50pm

Room: 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

Magazine editors have always put a premium on in-depth reporting and stylish writing. But in this new environment – with new magazines sprouting on the internet and established magazines charting their website traffic – the ability to write well on deadline has become a priority too.  In this introductory class, you will be exploring New York City and writing about a variety of topics including politics, crime, culture and fashion. Assignments include a mixture of long and short features, and hard news assignments. The goal is to learn to write sparkling prose, dig up news nuggets, and learn to pitch your work. The class also includes a  five-session photojournalism tutorial.

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Storied New York

T, 3-5:30pm

Suketu Mehta

Storied New York

Instructor: Suketu Mehta

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1023.002

Days: T, 3-5:30pm

Room: 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

New York is the most storied city in America; generations of writers have been entranced by it, and have produced masterpieces in tribute. We will look at the city as a character, in journalism, memoir, fiction, poetry, and film. What is the idea of New York in historical and contemporary imagination, and how different or similar are today's chroniclers of the city from their predecessors? What can we learn about urban reportage from the best practitioners of the genre? We will examine the texts for thematic concerns as well as those of craft. We will look at them as a car mechanic looks at a car; see how sentences are structured so that the text provides pleasure as well as information. And along the way, we will discover the broader possibilities and limitations of nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and film.

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Press Ethics

W, 6-8:30pm

David A. Kaplan

Press Ethics

Instructor: David A. Kaplan

Course ID: JOUR-GA 0012.001

Days: W, 6-8:30pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course is an introduction to how American law affects journalists and why that matters. It is also a course about journalistic ethics and how such professional notions as fairness, objectivity, responsibility, credibility and legitimacy intersect with law--and how they don't. Much of your other coursework will be about how to do things--how to report, write, edit. This course will often be about how to avoid problems.

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» News and Documentary

WRRI - NewsDoc

W, 10am-3:50pm

Cora Daniels

WRRI - NewsDoc

Instructor: Cora Daniels

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.009

Days: W, 10am-3:50pm

Room: 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

The best journalism flows from logical thinking, solid research, and comprehensive journalism. Through short deadline pieces and longer writing assignments this class will simulate a newsroom and teach you how to think like a journalist. New York City will be your reporting lab and you will be sent out into the city hunting for stories from day one. While the primary focus of this class is print, the skills will give you a strong journalism foundation that can be used in any media.

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TV Reporting I

T, 11am-3pm

Marcia Rock

TV Reporting I

Instructor: Marcia Rock

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1040.001

Days: T, 11am-3pm

Room: 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

This beginning course introduces students to field reporting. Students learn to develop story ideas, write to picture, structure a story and conduct interviews and shoot and edit. Beat assignments cover a variety of topics in the neighborhoods of New York. As the course develops, detailed script analysis is combined with in-depth discussions of the completed pieces. Students work in teams of 2-3. They use small DV cameras, linear and non-linear editing systems.

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Press Ethics

M, 7:15-9:45PM

Steve Chung

Press Ethics

Instructor: Steve Chung

Course ID: JOUR-GA 0012.002

Days: M, 7:15-9:45PM

Room: 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course offers through the case method a critical examination of current and recurring ethical and legal issues in journalism. Areas covered include reporting practices, roles of editors and executives, conflict of interest, sources, defamation and privacy, criminal justice and national security.

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Advanced TV Reporting

W, 4-8pm

Marcia Rock

Advanced TV Reporting

Instructor: Marcia Rock

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1175.001

Days: W, 4-8pm

Room: 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

We have several objectives in this class this semester. One is to finish your long piece. The other is to produce a short piece for our Election Special. You will work in groups of 2 for the election stories and then report live from various locations on election night as a follow-up to your reports. We will discuss this in class tonight and you will pitch stories on 9/21. This is very much a workshop class. You will present your work during the various stages of production—developing your story, reviewing your raw tapes, scripts and rough-cuts during class. Each of you will develop a schedule with deadlines for both stories and submit this by 9/28. During class, I will also bring in tapes to discuss that will stimulate discussion of form and content. Classes may run past 8:00 PM as we get more involved in story development so please don't schedule yourself too tightly on Wednesdays. Before you edit your election pieces, I will conduct an AVID session to give you some shortcuts. If you want to work on FCP, you have access to the 504 A computers, but you will compete with all the other students for time on those machines. Our final class is Dec 14. From past experience, that is not enough time to view all projects so I suggest we also meet on the 15th. We can meet in the afternoon as well since formal classes are over on the 14th. If you need the time, we could also have our last meeting on 12/19. Please do not schedule airline tickets before then. We will also pick a date in early February for your film festival screening. We normally have it on a Saturday, be we could try for a Friday. Please choose from Jan 28 or Feb 4. Parents and friends, of course, are invited.

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Video Editing

R, 6:20-10pm

David Spungen

Video Editing

Instructor: David Spungen

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.007

Days: R, 6:20-10pm

Room: 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

Dedicated to the TV News Magazine genre, broadcast journalism's long-form storytelling vehicle. The course is broken into three elements: (1) hands-on non-linear editing.  Students are given the original media shot, narration and a script from a story previously broadcast on CBS News and then edit their version of this segment in a simulated broadcast environment. (2) Reviewing the TV news magazine genre with lectures that emphasize visual demonstrations of the editing process and with student observations of weekly news magazine broadcasts.  The class will also compare the stylistic editing differences between documentaries and television news magazines. (3) Working with the students on their documentaries where the editing techniques learned techniques learned in the first half of the semester are applied to their documentary work.  During the semester, students will have multiple one-on-one editing sessions for screenings and to address individual needs.  Students may work with Avid, Final Cut Pro or both to do their editing.

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» Reporting New York

WRRI - RTN/RNY

M, 11am-4:50pm

Yvonne Latty

WRRI - RTN/RNY

Instructor: Yvonne Latty

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.005

Days: M, 11am-4:50pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

This class is your newsroom. You will learn to research, pitch story ideas, find the right angles, hit the streets and write it up on deadline. You will use this nation, rich with culture, diversity, money and power, to learn and practice your skills. Journalism is about people, their stories, the government and services that enable them to live their lives. This class is about finding your voice and embracing your beat with passion, respect and understanding. This is a multimedia class. In the course of our year together you will learn to shoot and edit video, discover the magic of audio and create compelling slideshows, all for the web and for our website, "NYC Pavement Pieces." But remember, the words always come first.

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» Reporting the Nation

WRRI - RTN/RNY

M, 11am-4:50pm

Yvonne Latty

WRRI - RTN/RNY

Instructor: Yvonne Latty

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.005

Days: M, 11am-4:50pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

This class is your newsroom. You will learn to research, pitch story ideas, find the right angles, hit the streets and write it up on deadline. You will use this nation, rich with culture, diversity, money and power, to learn and practice your skills. Journalism is about people, their stories, the government and services that enable them to live their lives. This class is about finding your voice and embracing your beat with passion, respect and understanding. This is a multimedia class. In the course of our year together you will learn to shoot and edit video, discover the magic of audio and create compelling slideshows, all for the web and for our website, "NYC Pavement Pieces." But remember, the words always come first.

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Law & Mass Communication

R, 9-11:30am

Ruth S. Hochberger

Law & Mass Communication

Instructor: Ruth S. Hochberger

Course ID: JOUR-GA 0011.002

Days: R, 9-11:30am

Room: 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course examines the application of ethical and legal principles to journalistic decision making, in print, broadcast and on-line. Unlike other professionals, journalists must make their ethical decisions rapidly, often without clear guidelines, and on their own, and the results of their decisions are open to public view. Also unlike other professionals, violations of ethical precepts are not punished by professional discipline or revocation of a license. This makes it vital that journalists weigh the value of how and what they choose to report against the potential harm to subjects, sources and society as a whole. The objective of this course is to provide guidance, through consideration of hypothetical and actual situations and analysis of case decisions, in developing a framework to help you make ethical and legal professional choices and to suggest some criteria against which those decisions may be measured.

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Investigative Reporting

T, 6:20-10pm

Joe Calderone

Investigative Reporting

Instructor: Joe Calderone

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.005

Days: T, 6:20-10pm

Room: 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course seeks students interested in learning the skills necessary to produce exclusive, hard-edged, ground-breaking reporting, combining human sources with original, document-based research. Bloggers, Tweeters, aspiring TV talking heads and print reporters will learn how to cut through the noise and produce reporting that stands out, makes a difference.and gives them an edge in a crowded field.

The emphasis is on New York City-based fieldwork resulting in a capstone, semester-long investigative project of your choosing that is worthy of publication. You will learn how to develop ideas for a project, find and cultivate sources, pitch and write the story in a clear, compelling and fair fashion while adhering to the highest standards of accuracy and objectivity. You will see how to mine the records of courthouses, police agencies, property clerks, health agencies, City Hall, campaign finance, tax authorities and other municipal, nonprofit and law-enforcement offices for exclusive material. Your aim will be to produce a story that sheds a light on a little-known or hidden topic with important implications for the public and readers.

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» Science, Health and Environmental Reporting

WRRI - SHERP

T, 10am-3pm

TBA

WRRI - SHERP

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.006

Days: T, 10am-3pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

SEE SYLLABUS.

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Science Literacy & Numeracy

M, 12-3pm

Charles Seife

Science Literacy & Numeracy

Instructor: Charles Seife

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1018.001

Days: M, 12-3pm

Room: 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

Science Literacy and Numeracy aims to give students a historical and literary context for science journalism, and will also introduce them to crucial concepts in statistics, probability and data analysis. The course will be rigorous, with an extensive reading list tracing the development of science journalism and examining the science journalist's role in society. There will also be heavy usage of problem sets and writing assignments aimed at showing students how to recognize "good science" and it's opposite. The course begins with a discussion of the conflict between scientists and non-scientists, and how science journalists are a bridge between the two cultures. Then students explore how society's way of understanding the natural world has changed over the centuries, the modern methods and philosophies of the practice of science, and some issues that affect scientists and scientific journalists that are not dreamt of in those philosophies. A mini-course in numeracy also arms students with the weapons to understand and dissect scientific studies. Using that knowledge, the class then returns to the scientific world to look at how science journalists have plied their craft, and at the pressures they face that make it hard for them to be solid bridges between scientists and non-scientists.

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Current Topics in SHERP

R, 10am-4:30pm

Dan Fagin

Current Topics in SHERP

Instructor: Dan Fagin

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1017.001

Days: R, 10am-4:30pm

Room: 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

Current Topics in Science, Health and Environmental Journalism

Current Topics in Science, Health and Environmental Journalism introduces students to the world of science journalism by looking at scientific topics that are at the cutting-edge of current research and also have profound implications for the way we live. In other words, they are the raw material for great journalism. As students immerse themselves in some challenging areas of current science, they will read the work of highly accomplished researchers and journalists, and will also hear from them directly in class. The goal throughout is be to understand and adopt the processes that the best science journalists use when they cover controversial science. You will learn how journalists interact with scientists, conduct research, organize information and write stories. Just as importantly, students also sharpen their analytical skills by writing almost every week for the SHERP webzine, Scienceline. Covering an assigned beat, students follow the peer-reviewed journals and other sources to stay on top of the news as it happens.

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Fieldwork - SHERP

TBA

TBA

Fieldwork - SHERP

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1290.003

Days: TBA

Room: TBA

Open to third semester SHERP students only.

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Medical Reporting

R, 9:30am-12:30pm

Ivan Oransky, MD

Medical Reporting

Instructor: Ivan Oransky, MD

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1187.001

Days: R, 9:30am-12:30pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

Medical Reporting provides an in-depth look at many of the most important contemporary topics in the always dynamic field of medical journalism, including the biology of cancer, environment-related illness, epidemiology, and the precepts of sound medical research and peer review. Students write several short pieces on journal reports, medical conferences and community health lectures, and one longer, feature-length piece on a health topic of their choice. Medical researchers and prominent journalists are frequent guest speakers. Open to third semester SHERP students only.

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Science Reporting

R, 2:30-5:30pm

John Rennie

Science Reporting

Instructor: John Rennie

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1180.001

Days: R, 2:30-5:30pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

This advanced SHERP class is intended to give a realistic preview of life as a working science journalist. We will explore the process step by step, from finding a story idea to pitching it to surviving the editing process to making sure the final product is accurate, clear and compelling. We will also look at science journalism from the editor's point of view. Open to third semester SHERP students only.

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» Studio 20

Digital Thinking

M, 3-6:15pm

Jay Rosen

Digital Thinking

Instructor: Jay Rosen

Course ID: JOUR-GA 0012.003

Days: M, 3-6:15pm

Room: 657

In this course we will examine what makes journalism different now that it runs on a digital platform. Readings and discussion will focus on making sense of the large shifts that accompany the move to digital production and distribution in professional journalism, including the "always on" web, the lower barriers to entry, the rise of social media and "the people formerly known as the audience," the ease of production using digital tools, the "unbundling" of news packages that were well adapted to prior platforms, the loss of monopoly status among news organizations, and the re-voicing of journalism in a more interactive environment for news. By comparing press ethics under the "old" system and the new codes that have emerged in the digital era, students will be able to hone in on what is different for professional journalists today, which is knowledge they will need for the remainder of the Studio 20 program.

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WRRI - Studio20

F, 2-6pm

Jason Samuels

WRRI - Studio20

Instructor: Jason Samuels

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.004

Days: F, 2-6pm

Room: 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

See syllabus for details.

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Studio 1

T, 2:30-7pm

Mitchell Stephens

Studio 1

Instructor: Mitchell Stephens

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.009

Days: T, 2:30-7pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course will employ historical analyses along with examinations of contemporary journalism in an effort to gain insights into the process of journalistic innovation, the obstacles it faces, the benefits it brings and the potential for further innovation. How have understandings of quality in -journalism and of journalism's purposes changed or failed to change? How have the forms in which journalism is presented evolved? How might they continue to evolve? Has journalism's field of vision expanded? Does it need to expand further? Can journalism's established genres - the news story, the opinion piece, the feature - be invigorated? Should they be reconceived? With the aid of the insights they have gained, students - primarily working in teams - will be asked experiment with new approaches to journalism of their own.

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Hyperlocal Newsroom Section 3

F, 11-2:40pm

Yvonne Latty

Hyperlocal Newsroom Section 3

Instructor: Yvonne Latty

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1080.003

Days: F, 11-2:40pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

See course description listed under Electives.

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Studio 3

W, 2-5:40pm

Jay Rosen

Studio 3

Instructor: Jay Rosen

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.013

Days: W, 2-5:40pm

Room: 652

See instructor for details.

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» Graduate Electives

Fieldwork in Journalism

TBA

Sylvan Solloway

Fieldwork in Journalism

Instructor: Sylvan Solloway

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1290.001

Days: TBA

Room: TBA

Instructor permission required.

http://journalism.nyu.edu/career-services/credit-internship-course/

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Writing for Wide Readership

R, 5:15-7:15pm

TBA

Writing for Wide Readership

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 0060.001

Days: R, 5:15-7:15pm

Room: 7th Floor Library

» Syllabus (PDF)

Sponsored by The NYU Catherine B. Reynolds Foundation Program in Social Entrepreneurship and the NYU Wagner School of Public Service.

Expressly designed for graduate students outside of Journalism and FAS.

How to translate the specialized languages of particular disciplines in order to reach a larger public is at the heart of this course. Too often, specialists find themselves hostage to the arcane tongues of particular disciplines. Yet they possess knowledge that often cries out to be understood by a broader public. The course will concentrate on the structure of good storytelling, the marshaling of evidence, the unfolding of convincing narrative, and the rhetorical style necessary for turning useful work into memorable writing. Good writers are good readers and this course will explore some of the more successful practitioners of public writing and the art of advancing an argument for a general readership, including, among others, Lewis Thomas, George Orwell and Joan Didion.

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Opinion

TBA

TBA

Opinion

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.004

Days: TBA

Room: TBA

Details to come.

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Fieldwork in Journalism

F, 1-3pm

TBA

Fieldwork in Journalism

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1290.001

Days: F, 1-3pm

Room: 659

Instructor permission required.

http://journalism.nyu.edu/career-services/credit-internship-course/

[x] close.

Directed Reading

TBA

TBA

Directed Reading

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1299.001

Days: TBA

Room: TBA

To enroll in Directed Readings, an interested student must find a full-time faculty member to be a sponsor and then must develop and file a syllabus. The syllabus must be approved by the faculty member and the Journalism Director of Graduate Studies. It must list, in week by week fashion, all readings and all writing assignments that the student will undertake for the Directed Readings. Once approved, this syllabus constitutes your "contract" on the project and the student's work will be judged and graded with that in mind.

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Entrepreneurial Journalism

TBA

TBA

Entrepreneurial Journalism

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1025.001

Days: TBA

Room: TBA

Details to come.

[x] close.

Writing the Arts

W, 1-4:40pm

Caroline Miller

Writing the Arts

Instructor: Caroline Miller

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1231.003

Days: W, 1-4:40pm

Room: 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

The Cultural Scene: Arts Coverage and Criticism

New Yorkers like to think they live in the arts capital of the world. While this claim may be disputed, what isn’t arguable is the wealth of artistic talent here, the sheer number of musicians, sculptors, painters, photographers, dancers, filmmakers, playwrights, novelists, actors, storytellers, and clowns (not to speak of people working in genres yet to be named) who create work and find audiences here. This course will use the New York cultural scene to explore journalism about the arts. We will hear from accomplished arts writers and critics as well as players in the scene—ie an artist, a performer, a filmmaker, a producer, a playwright, a press agent, a gallerist, an art book publisher—to get insight into how this universe works, and what you need to know to write about it credibly.

 

You will be asked to write (and rewrite!) a major profile or feature, as well as several shorter pieces and reviews, in a variety of formats, aimed at different audiences and different publications, online and off. You will keep a blog on a scene of your choosing. We will read work by writers ranging from legendary critics to provocative new voices—your choices as well as mine. Topics for discussion will include challenges in writing about the creative process, the cultural value of criticism, and the business of culture. Questions to explore include: What is taste, anyway? How mean is too mean? And isn’t everyone a critic now?

 

The focus of the class will be on your writing, but for inspiration and perspective we will read arts writers and critics from all over the map, to examine their voices, points of entry, and insights into the culture, high and low. You’ll be asked regularly to find work that interests you; we’ll compare different writers on the same subject. While we'll focus on good writing and critics who demonstrate what critics bring to the party, we'll also look at the ways critics can be annoying: spoilers, summarizers, and show-offs.

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Investigative Reporting

R, 6:20-10pm

David Spungen

Investigative Reporting

Instructor: David Spungen

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.006

Days: R, 6:20-10pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

Your objective will be to master basic investigative tools and techniques, as well as how to apply them to everyday reporting and major enterprise pieces. We will explore how to take advantage of the two main sources of information documents and people and discuss when and how to use computer data to both enhance a story or provide the foundation for a major project. Throughout the course, the goal will be to constantly delve beneath the surface. Going deep is the essence of investigative reporting, which pulls together all publicly available information, as well as harder-to-find material, to present the fullest possible picture. Corporations and powerful individuals employ armies of PR experts, lawyers and lobbyists to ensure that only their version of reality prevails, and it is the lonely duty of journalists to dispel this fog of self-interest. At least as important as mastering the technical skills will be learning to think critically and skeptically. The relentlessly upbeat press release, the carefully worded SEC filing or the late-Friday-afternoon earnings statement each, as a matter of course, should be probed for accuracy and omission. What important development went unsaid? Did the company chairman really resign to "spend more time with his family"?

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Profiles

R, 6-9:40pm

TBA

Profiles

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1231.002

Days: R, 6-9:40pm

Room: 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

Every magazine editor covets the truly brilliant profile (and is eager to discover the next truly brilliant profile writer.) In this class, you'll learn what it takes to make a profile so vivid and so gorgeously reported that it's as much of a page-turner as the most gripping long-form narrative. We'll talk about voice -- how to find and harness (and have confidence in) that sometimes elusive point of view that makes your work stand out. We'll address the not-so-basics: how to get access; how to do the ultimate write-around when you can't get access. We'll also study the many genres of the profile -- from the political portrait to the media/sports/arts/celebrity profile to the definitive classics to the Q&A. By the end of the semester, you will have written a series of profiles.

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The Editor's Vision

M, 5:30-9:10pm

Alexis Gelber

The Editor's Vision

Instructor: Alexis Gelber

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1019.001

Days: M, 5:30-9:10pm

Room: 652

The class will examine how editors imprint their own sensibility on a magazine, woo an audience and develop a unique identity for their publication. Coming up with the right mix of articles is a constant challenge; editors are always trying to re-invent the formula as well as struggling to find interesting ways to package service pieces or celebrity profiles, or come up with catchy covers and headlines to boost newsstand circulation.

New magazines evolve either from one person's passionate idea (Esquire and its founder Arnold Gingrich, Tina Brown and the Daily Beast) or are launched by corporate magazine development departments (Oprah, Real Simple, Lucky). This class will examine the history and evolution of magazines, from the hits and misses (Portfolio, Domino) of recent years to a look back at the past. Weekly classes will focus on different aspects of magazine-making, and leading editors, art directors and photo editors will visit as guest speakers to provide their expert insights.

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The Personal Essay

T, 11:00am-2:40pm

Perri Klass

The Personal Essay

Instructor: Perri Klass

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.011

Days: T, 11:00am-2:40pm

Room: 657

This course examines the long, thoughtful, and well-written personal essay, and the power and privilege of using the first person, as narrative voice, as perspective, and as technique.  We will be looking at how research and reporting can be presented in the first person, and we will be examining memoir, but most particularly at memoir which goes beyond the strictly personal. We will discuss the pleasures and pitfalls of writing about yourself as a character in serious nonfiction, the complexities of keeping your distance and coming too close, and of course, the interplay of experience and accuracy, memory and narrative.  We’ll look at personal narratives constructed for purposes of entertainment, advocacy, intellectual discovery, and even revenge.  And we shall consider the always intriguing question raised by the first line of David Copperfield: "Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must s how."  We will examine essays which incorporate research and reportage, journeys and personal narratives, memoirs and deliberately constructed adventures. We will deliberately attempt the transformation of memoir and memory into personal essay, and of reported experience into personal essay. Our theme will be the use of the personal essay format, and the incorporation of the personal narrative voice, in strongly written pieces which address a wide variety of issues, at home (literally) and out in the great wide world. We will talk about the many options for presenting reported material, and about the advantages—and pitfalls—of the personal voice. We will talk about the writer’s job of constructing that personal voice in an essay, and about the essential job of writing a personal essay which is about more than that personal voice and that personal perspective.

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Hyperlocal Newsroom

F, 9am-12:40pm

Jason Maloney

Hyperlocal Newsroom

Instructor: Jason Maloney

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1080.001

Days: F, 9am-12:40pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

To come.

 

Studio 20 students should register for this section.

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Hyperlocal Newsroom

F, 1-4:40pm

Jason Maloney

Hyperlocal Newsroom

Instructor: Jason Maloney

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1080.002

Days: F, 1-4:40pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

To come.

 

BER students should register for this section.

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Writing Social Justice

W, 1:30-5:10pm

TBA

Writing Social Justice

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.002

Days: W, 1:30-5:10pm

Room: 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

Here are some matters that we should consider as we work our way through the semester: What are the forces that shape and have shaped American politics? Are politics and campaigns changing, or are they much the same? How good or how bad is the press in covering politics? Are politics over-covered or under-covered or do they get what they deserve? How good is the political press? What's the role of money in politics? Who has the money and what do politicians do to get it? What has been the effect, or lack of effect, of the McCain-Feingold law, or, in other words, public monies vs. private monies? What groups are important in American politics, other than political parties? For example, corporations, political action groups, labor unions, and the like? Do Americans get an honest government? Do they get a government they deserve? What are the roles of third parties and third-party candidates, and what obstacles do they face? What is the role of religion in politics? What role do poverty and immigration play in this election and American politics?

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Storytellers

T, 3-6:40PM

David Samuels

Storytellers

Instructor: David Samuels

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1231.001

Days: T, 3-6:40PM

Room: 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

Great stories are shaped by talented, reckless, funny, arrogant and often misanthropic writers and reporters working at the height of their craft. In this class, we will study how world-shaking historical events and everyday experiences alike can be crafted into original journalistic narratives. We will concentrate on the writer’s angle of approach to the subject – his or her “voice” – which is made more or less convincing through his or her control over language and the depth and range of his/her reporting. The first half of each class will consist of close readings of nonfiction narratives on Balkan wars, acid trips, nervous breakdowns, rock and roll concerts, a sarin gas attack in the Tokyo subways, a visit to the Iowa State Fair and assorted other subjects by some of my favorite journalists and novelists including Tom Wolfe, Joan Didion, David Foster Wallace, Denis Johnson, Rebecca West, Ryszard Kapucinski, Haruki Murakami, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Joseph Mitchell. Each class will begin promptly at 12:30 PM and will be divided between an hour and thirty minute discussion of the assigned reading and an hour and fifteen minute discussion of your written work. Latecomers will be greeted with derision. We will break at 2 PM for afternoon snack. We will also enjoy visits from enlivening and informative guests from Harper’s, The New Yorker and other high-class venues, who can answer any questions you might have about reporting and editing, and who will help you shape your ideas with an eye towards publishing your own work.

Literary Reportage and Magazine priority.

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Writing the Long Form Narrative

R, 1:30-5:10pm

Adam L. Penenberg

Writing the Long Form Narrative

Instructor: Adam L. Penenberg

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.003

Days: R, 1:30-5:10pm

Room: 7th Floor Library

» Syllabus (PDF)

This seminar focuses on the various components that comprise in-depth magazine stories and non-fiction books. We'll dissect great modern and classic magazine stories, books and book proposals for story, character arcs, dialogue, scenes, analysis, structure, transitions, verb tense, point of view and style. The goal is to figure out how memorable magazine features and narrative non-fiction books that keep your attention to the very last page are created, then to take what we've learned and apply it to our own work. There is one semester-long writing assignment—a 3,000+-word feature story—with several shorter related pieces involving scenes, character, dialogue, or analysis, all of which can be incorporated into your final story. Along the way we'll work on pitches, research and interview techniques, time management, outlines, editing and multiple drafts, and other challenges today's non-fiction narrative writers face.

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The Personal Essay

T, 11:00am-2:40pm

Perri Klass

The Personal Essay

Instructor: Perri Klass

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.011

Days: T, 11:00am-2:40pm

Room: 657

This course examines the long, thoughtful, and well-written personal essay, and the power and privilege of using the first person, as narrative voice, as perspective, and as technique.  We will be looking at how research and reporting can be presented in the first person, and we will be examining memoir, but most particularly at memoir which goes beyond the strictly personal. We will discuss the pleasures and pitfalls of writing about yourself as a character in serious nonfiction, the complexities of keeping your distance and coming too close, and of course, the interplay of experience and accuracy, memory and narrative.  We’ll look at personal narratives constructed for purposes of entertainment, advocacy, intellectual discovery, and even revenge.  And we shall consider the always intriguing question raised by the first line of David Copperfield: "Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must s how."  We will examine essays which incorporate research and reportage, journeys and personal narratives, memoirs and deliberately constructed adventures. We will deliberately attempt the transformation of memoir and memory into personal essay, and of reported experience into personal essay. Our theme will be the use of the personal essay format, and the incorporation of the personal narrative voice, in strongly written pieces which address a wide variety of issues, at home (literally) and out in the great wide world. We will talk about the many options for presenting reported material, and about the advantages—and pitfalls—of the personal voice. We will talk about the writer’s job of constructing that personal voice in an essay, and about the essential job of writing a personal essay which is about more than that personal voice and that personal perspective.

[x] close.