Course Listings | Fall 2012

Course information subject to change. Please check back frequently for updates. All courses are at 20 Cooper Square unless otherwise noted. To view a course description and syllabus, click on each course’s Title. Electives are the last tab and are available to all students.

» Undergraduate Journalism

Honors - Broadcast, Multimedia & Print Convergence

Thur 10:00am-1:00pm

Jason Samuels

Honors - Broadcast, Multimedia & Print Convergence

Instructor: Jason Samuels

Course ID: JOUR-UA 351.01

Days: Thur 10:00am-1:00pm

Room: 20 Cooper, 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

SENIORS ONLY

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry, The Beat

Honors is a year-long research, writing and reporting course for seniors in which students choose and develop a senior thesis subject of their own choosing in the first semester and complete the project in the second. Students take Honors Advanced Reporting, followed by Honors Senior Seminar. Honors students must have a 3.65 average.

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Honors - Print Long Form Bias

Tues 3:30pm-6:00pm

Brooke Kroeger

Honors - Print Long Form Bias

Instructor: Brooke Kroeger

Course ID: JOUR-UA 351.02

Days: Tues 3:30pm-6:00pm

Room: 20 Cooper, 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

CONTEXT AND MAIN OBJECTIVE

Our objective over the course of this year, I hope, is already clear: We are going to produce a piece of heavily reported, gorgeously crafted long-form journalism in the narrative, expository, or investigative style as the equivalent of an academic senior honors thesis. It’s as simple as that. If you were writing an honors thesis for your companion major in CAS, it would need to be something like 40 to 60 pages with full citations. In Journalism, we do this differently, with respect to common journalistic practice. We write for the sophisticated general reading public, not for academics, but we also want to present work that reflects a scholar’s knowledge and intent but that is produced to engage readers with our research and writing in the journalistic way.

You will find that this course is is likely not the same as other classes you have taken. It’s more of an organized tutorial in a group setting, sometimes with individual conferences, too. It is built to a large extent to address any lacks you feel. I will endeavor to fill those gaps as effectively as possible.


Earlier groups have reported devoting anywhere from 10 to 20 hours a week to this project. Most enjoyed the freedom of being able to choose their own subjects as they delighted and agonized about pursuing their stories maniacally for a solid year. Students have especially liked the challenge and freedom of writing at significant length. There is always joy and frenzy in producing the magazine and we will experience that, too.

 

EXPLOITING AND VERIFYING YOUR KNOWLEDGE

It is not a requirement, but I strongly encourage you to draw your subject however broadly from the learning you are doing in your companion major. We will talk more about that.

We will also produce a fact-checking research and citation list that shows the academic research we have done on the topic, the interviews we have conducted, the published work we will be referring to or citing, and the other writers and researches we have examined to inform our thinking.

 

INTEGRITY

It goes without saying that I expect the highest journalistic standard and that no form of plagiarism, falsification or fabrication of any kind will be tolerated.


SPECS

The expected length of this piece will be a minimum of 6,000 words and a maximum of 9,000 words. Your model? Long-form pieces in the Atlantic, Harper’s, The New Yorker, Esquire, and the like. In previous classes, student stories have been published as is, in excerpt, or re-fashioned into go-to blogs and reflective personal pieces.

Here’s our zine to help you know where we are headed and where your work will appear no matter what:
http://shoeleathermagazine.com.

If the prospects for publication are good, we will “password protect” to keep the work off search engines until you are ready to release it. Once released, we will re-post it on our site with a link to the other url.


MULTIMEDIA

You’ll note these pieces were illustrated with handsome slide shows and with a fashion video (Wu) in one case. You will need to produce and/or provide (with permission) multimedia elements to enhance your work, so you need to plan this as you go. For that reason, we will complete our final drafts by the end of March so that we have April to produce our multimedia accompaniments. And also for that reason, have a camera at the ready when you’re out reporting. If you don’t already have a good tape recorder with a USB connection, you’ll want one.

THE CLASS BLOG/BEATNOTES

We will blog every week for ourselves, privately, with an 8 pm deadline the night before class. We do this on my Basecamp site, http://bknyu.basecamphq.com, where I will enroll you. This is a variation on the time-honored journalistic tradition of producing weekly “beat notes.” Offering these to each other will also encourage you to exercise your writing voice while it keeps you focused on our long-term goal by picking away at the story week after week. Benign accountability. These beat notes should be well-crafted and engaging. They should reflect the week’s street reporting, interviewing, reading, scholarly conversations, and reflections – whatever gives flesh to your ideas and helps you focus in on the writing to come. For me and for your classmate, they have the important side benefit of keeping the rest of us current with your progress. It helps us know about the challenges you encounter and where we might have helpful suggestions. It helps me to see where there are common issues we can address in class. Being generous about the work of others enables others to be generous about yours, so we will devote time regularly to each other. You will find yourself called upon to do this throughout your professional careers, so we may as well start now. As to blogging publicly about your work, or creating a Tumblr or whatnot -- your choice. One student has done this in the past. Most choose to keep their findings under wraps until they publish. Likewise, I’ve not yet had a student who tweeted about his or her subject area during the year, but I’m open to that. All of this is your choice and we can discuss the pros and cons. We will also decide as a group how private or public we want our group effort as a class to be as it unfolds.

INSPIRATIONAL BUT CRITICAL READING

We will study the work of the greats for inspiration and for craft. Most classes will involve time spent studying the work of the great long-form narrative journalists, current and past. Sometimes I will invite you to invite your heroes in to talk with us, or I will ask you to interview them on our behalf and share what you learn with the rest of the group. I will suggest pieces for us to read (some great, some not-so) to help us set our own standards. We will analyze together what we admire and what we don’t, using a method called “Charting” to help you understand the critical importance of structure. It’s important to do the readings ahead of time, please. Sometimes I hope you will make suggestions growing out of your own research and reporting.

EXERCISES IN NARRATIVE TECHNIQUE

We will do exercises in narrative technique that will come weekly as part of your BeatNote assignment. I will be encouraging you in a variety of ways to work with a bagful of literary devices. The most common errors of your predecessors have been trite phrase and word choice, indiscriminate use of the passive voice, appositive pile-ups, and the squandering of the element of suspense. Think about these and try to self-edit them out before we see your weekly posts.

DURF PROPOSALS

We will apply for DURF grants to support our research. I will work with you closely on these. The deadline comes at a very convenient time of the year in helping us to hone our ideas and pinpoint exactly what we are going after.  This class traditionally has had a very good success rate with the DURF judges.

ONE FALL ARTICLE ASSIGNMENT

In addition to our blogs, we will do one major (minor compared to the thesis) reporting-writing assignment in the Fall term. Your query will be due the second week in November and your story will be due the day before Thanksgiving break, so that you can have a real break and I have time to edit the pieces, giving us time to discuss them in class and you time to rewrite them before the term ends. We call these “Element” pieces. They will emanate from your overall research and reporting and come in at 1200-1500 words. They will not be a capsule version of the Honors project, but only an element of it that you are ready to develop by the time we are working on it. It could be a profile of one of the protagonists or even one of the minor figures in your story. It could be a closer look at one of the institutions that show up in your reporting. It could be the development of a trend that works into your overall piece. The idea is to exercise your writing muscle in a structured form and to produce something that deepens your understanding of the overall subject matter and moves you along to the bigger goal. Many of these have ended up as a section of the big piece; others just provide background that helps you write with more fluidity and comprehension once we get to February. If you pick your subject right, it could be publishable on its own. That has happened.

TYPICAL CLASS SCHEDULE


Our class is 2 ½ hours long. Typically, I will go over the Beatnotes to point out issues I’m seeing that relate to everyone’s work generally. Often, we will dissect one or two of them for particular points that will hopefully be helpful to everyone. Everyone will get a chance over the course of the term to be in the hot seat. We will discuss the reading assignment, have a methods lab exercise (emanating from issues we see emerging) or a guest writer/editor/speaker to whom we can pitch our work. In the second term, we will have weeks where we are in private conference. This can only happen, of course, when the work is in solid draft.


I will post the readings and the timetable for the following week the evening prior to the following week’s class. The choices have to be built out of your needs as they emerge, so bear with me on this. There is method!

STORY QUERIES AND DRAFTS


For your story queries and drafts, when we get to that, I might ask you to use the “Writeboard” function of Basecamp, or, at times we will use Google Docs, which is great for collaborative editing. I will let you know which and will give you a tutorial so you can make maximum use of their wonders.

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Methods and Practice: Point of View

Fri 12:20p-4:00p

James McBride

Methods and Practice: Point of View

Instructor: James McBride

Course ID: JOUR-UA 202, section 001

Days: Fri 12:20p-4:00p

Room: 20 Cooper Square,652

» Syllabus (PDF)

Be ready to write longhand. No computers. No cell phones in class. Pencil and
yellow legal sized paper only. Please be on time. Bring a jacket and a metro card.
For the first class, there is absolute silence when you enter the room. No
talking. Not even to say hello to your neighbor. You want to hear a hello? Here it
is: Hello. Now, no talking for the first ten minutes of class. It sounds stupid, but it
is our first exercise.

Good writing is all about finding the right detail or set of details that will show, not
tell, the event to the listener. You are always fighting gravity, always fighting the reader
who will close the paper, book, magazine and tune you out. We will focus on placing you
in the right mental place to find the details that will tell the story, from your perspective, in
a way that is honest to your truth and hold the reader.

There will be some reading aloud in class. There will be no bloodlettings. If
you’re willing to fail, you will be successful. If you’re already a journalistic success, this
isn’t the class for you. Remember, writing is the act of continually failing at excellence,
and uniformity is the ceiling against which great writing will forever bump. The mid term
and final will be your writing.

Before each class, you will be expected to read the following excerpts from “A
Nietzsche Reader” (Penguin) translated by R. J. Hollingdale. They are not long, but they
are important. We may alter this list based on my assessment of your abilities . Reading
assignments in Gary Smith and Micheal Herr’s books, as well as our Marvel Comic
class, will be assigned as we go deeper into the semester and I am able to assess your
abilities.

[x] close.

Methods and Practice: Visual Reporting

Fri 10:00am - 1:40pm

Kathy Willens

Methods and Practice: Visual Reporting

Instructor: Kathy Willens

Course ID: JOUR-UA 203, section 001

Days: Fri 10:00am - 1:40pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course will train you to think, see, and take photos visually and journalistically. Using a 35mm SLR digital or film camera, you’ll learn how professional photojournalists make story-telling photographs suitable for publication in newspapers, magazines or online. By practicing the same skills professional photojournalists use, you will learn to document daily life and special events and how to capture fleeting moments with a camera. By semester’s end, you should have a basic understanding of the history of photojournalism and the impact photographs have on society, legal and ethical concerns of photojournalists, digital production of photographs, and the importance of captions and text accompanying those photos. You should also have a variety of photojournalistic images suitable for an entry-level portfolio.

 You are expected to develop story ideas, cover events, edit your own photographs and produce your own digitally scanned images using Adobe Photoshop, and burn them onto CD’s or DVD’s for classroom viewing and critiques.

 This is NOT a darkroom or basic photography class. The emphasis is on taking and editing pictures. A basic understanding of camera operation and exposure is required. All film and print developing or digital processing, is to be done outside of class.

 

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Elective Reporting Topics: Writing Memorable Magazine Profiles

Tues 11:00p-2:40p

Pamela Newkirk

Elective Reporting Topics: Writing Memorable Magazine Profiles

Instructor: Pamela Newkirk

Course ID: JOUR-UA 204, section 002

Days: Tues 11:00p-2:40p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

What makes a magazine profile grab you from the first paragraph and keep you interested for 5,000 words? How do you get story subjects to co-operate and give you enough time to get behind the public veneer? What are the different narrative ways to tell a story and make the person come alive on the page? The goal of this course is to learn the basic rules of profile writing, and also how and when to break them. The emphasis will be on writing a series of profiles of different types and lengths, from a 500-word person-in-the-news story to a Q&A to a full-fledged richly-textured portrait. Unlike covering breaking news, writing a magazine profile offers the opportunity to display a distinctive authorial voice and to project attitude in the give-and-take with your subject. We will read and analyze current profiles on the newsstand, as well as collections from New York Magazine and Vanity Fair. Guest speakers will include magazine editors and well-known writers.


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Journalism Seminar: The Art of Opinion Writing & Polemic

Mon 2:00pm-4:30pm

Katie Roiphe

Journalism Seminar: The Art of Opinion Writing & Polemic

Instructor: Katie Roiphe

Course ID: JOUR-UA 401, section 001

Days: Mon 2:00pm-4:30pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 700

» Syllabus (PDF)

The Art of Opinion Writing & Polemic

polemic  
Etymology: French polémique, from Middle French, from polemique controversial, from Greek polemikos warlike, hostile, from polemos war; perhaps akin to Greek pelemizein to shake. 1 a : an aggressive attack on or refutation of the opinions or principles of another b : the art or practice of disputation or controversy.

How does one break into the current arena of cultural debate and internet flurries of gossip and analysis?  How does one craft a charismatic and forceful opinion piece, or a long polemic? This course will examine the art  and history of opinion writing or polemic from Milton’s Satan to Christopher Hitchens. We will closely examine the construction of great and powerful and flamboyant and splashy and cranky arguments, and learn the practical skills  involved in writing a successful op-ed or stylish contrarian piece. We will examine and analyze various kinds of authority and how one projects them. We will entertain the idea of writing an ‘unbalanced’ piece as a virtue, and discuss how one generates the crazy confidence required for bravura performance in polemic. This is both a rigorous writing and reading class;  both an academic exploration of the uses of rhetoric and a practical class in a set of skills very useful in the current marketplace.

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Journalism & Society: Women and the Media

Tues 2:30pm-5:00pm

Carol Sternhell

Journalism & Society: Women and the Media

Instructor: Carol Sternhell

Course ID: JOUR-UA 503, section 001

Days: Tues 2:30pm-5:00pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

Women & the Media is a collaborative seminar designed to examine the complex relationship
(or different, contradictory relationships) between those humans we call “women” and those
forms of discourse we call “media.” We will consider women both as subjects and objects, as
artists and models, as creators of “media” in its many forms and as media’s creations. What
does our culture’s “media” tell us about its ideas of gender? What, if anything, does our gender
tell us about our readings of “media”? Student participation in this seminar is key: students are
expected to attend all sessions, to complete all the reading (there's lots of reading!), to
participate actively in discussion, and to lead one of the class sessions themselves. Leading a
class means opening the day’s conversation with a presentation, critiquing and elaborating on
the assigned reading, bringing in additional relevant material, and suggesting questions or
issues that seem particularly interesting or troublesome. The purpose of the course is to
develop our critical and self-critical faculties as journalists, media critics, consumers of media,
and women or men—to think clearly, challenge our pet assumptions, and have fun.
Along with attendance and informed class participation, students are required to conduct a miniresearch
project and present their findings to the class. I want you to pick a “women and media”
topic that really interests you and then report the hell out of it. If you’re interested in the effect of
music videos on teenage girls, for instance, you would first put together an extensive
bibliography of what has already been written on the subject. You would figure out what the key
questions in the field were: do media images affect teens’ behavior or not, and how can anyone
tell? You might interview some of the leading researchers in the area and tell us what they say.
You’ll certainly want to read the most important books/articles on your subject. A paper is not
required; instead, students will present their findings to the class during our last three sessions.

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Production & Publication: TV Newscast

Tues 1:00p-7:00p

Joe Peyronnin

Production & Publication: TV Newscast

Instructor: Joe Peyronnin

Course ID: JOUR-UA 302, section 001

Days: Tues 1:00p-7:00p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, TV Studio (room 761)

» Syllabus (PDF)

Students in this class will be involved in every aspect of producing a television newscast. The weekly shows will be broadcast live on the NYU cable system and streamed online. Each student will take on a different role, from anchoring, line producing, directing, to running audio, prompter or EP’ing.  There will be strong emphasis on script writing, story selection and placement, as well as execution in the control room. The class assignments include both editorial and operational functions. Our class will act as a living newsroom where there is a tight deadline to get the show on the air. There will also be reporting assignments outside of the Tuesday class. “NYU Tonight” airs at 6pm every Tuesday for 30 minutes.  We will reconvene as a group from 630 to 7p for post-game discussion.

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Journalism & Society: Minorities in the Media

Wed1:00p-3:30p

Pamela Newkirk

Journalism & Society: Minorities in the Media

Instructor: Pamela Newkirk

Course ID: JOUR-UA 503, section 002

Days: Wed1:00p-3:30p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

It has been 40 years since President Johnson’s National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders released its findings on the civil unrest that erupted in urban areas across the nation. The panel, commonly referred to as the Kerner Commission, concluded that we are living in two nations, “black, white, separate and unequal,” and devoted an entire chapter to the impact the media had on the nation’s race relations. “We believe that the media have thus far failed to report adequately on the causes and consequences of civil disorders and the underlying problems of race relations,” the report said. It added: “The media report and write from the standpoint of a white man’s world. The ills of the ghetto, the difficulties of life there, the Negro’s burning sense of grievance, are seldom conveyed.”
The report criticized as “shockingly backward” the industry’s failure to hire, train and promote African Americans. At the time, fewer than five percent of the newsroom jobs in the United States were held by African Americans. Today, despite the progress that’s been made in the hiring and coverage of African Americans and other so-called minorities, many critics say that the Kerner Report findings continue to resonate today. With the report as a backdrop, we will examine the portrayals of racial and ethnic minorities in the media, paying particular attention to African Americans – the subject of the Kerner Report – but also others, including Latinos, Asians, women, and gays and lesbians.

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Journalism & Society: Covering the Earth

Wednesday 10:00p-12:50

Dan Fagin

Journalism & Society: Covering the Earth

Instructor: Dan Fagin

Course ID: JOUR-UA 503, section 003

Days: Wednesday 10:00p-12:50

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

Environmental journalism is hot again, and not only because the climate is warming – though that helps. As web-based platforms increasingly dominate mass media, what specific forms should the “new” environmental journalism take? This class will begin by tracing the development of traditional environmental journalism from John Muir to John McPhee and will then look closely at how the field is adapting to a fast-changing media landscape. With the help of guests and timely readings, we will confront thorny questions about environmental advocacy, citizen media, issue framing, risk balancing and the scientific process. And yes, we will produce stories that matter on the biggest news beat of all. This advanced seminar will include intensive journalistic writing assignments, as well as extensive readings for in-class discussion.

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Journalism as Literature: Learning from the Best to be the Best

Tues 11:00a-1:30p

Michael Norman

Journalism as Literature: Learning from the Best to be the Best

Instructor: Michael Norman

Course ID: JOUR-UA 504, section 001

Days: Tues 11:00a-1:30p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

Learning from The Best To Be The Best is a survey of some of the most entertaining and well-written literary journalism of the last two centuries. We will read these articles and book excerpts carefully - "deep reading," it is called - to discover how good writers take basic journalism and enliven it with literary technique. We want to catalog as much of that technique and structure as we can so that we can "steal it," appropriate the devices for our own work. Students will work in teams; each week a team will "present" the readings and incite a discussion with the rest of the class. There will be some three to five formal academic papers in which students will be asked to demonstrate their understanding of the material, and there will be a number of "creative" assignments as well. The main text for the course is an excellent anthology of non-fiction: The Art of Fact by Kerrane and Yagoda..

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Issues and Ideas - Reporting in the Line of Fire: Issues in Covering the Middle East

Mon 3:45-6:15

Mohamad Bazzi

Issues and Ideas - Reporting in the Line of Fire: Issues in Covering the Middle East

Instructor: Mohamad Bazzi

Course ID: JOUR-UA 505, section 001

Days: Mon 3:45-6:15

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

The Middle East is in the headlines every day. But the coverage is often bewildering, focusing on the latest death toll in Iraq, a terrorist bombing, or an ongoing political crisis. There is little historical or political context in most of this coverage.

This course will provide students with an understanding of contemporary issues in the Middle East (such as the rise of militant Islam; the roots of Sunni-Shia tension; the failure of Arab nationalism; terrorism versus national resistance; the problem of the nation-state) by reading works that combine history, political analysis, and narrative journalism. This historical and political background will help students to eventually write about the region with depth and nuance, and to evaluate the coverage that they read.

We will also discuss the challenges of reporting from a region with competing narratives, authoritarian regimes that have little respect for a free press, and places where journalists must work under constant danger. We will have occasional guest speakers who have worked as foreign correspondents or editors managing coverage of the region.

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Internship

Fri 1:00pm - 3:00pm

Sylvan Solloway

Internship

Instructor: Sylvan Solloway

Course ID: JOUR-UA 980

Days: Fri 1:00pm - 3:00pm

Room: TBA

DECLARED JOURNALISM MAJORS ONLY Hours Arranged

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry, The Beat

To enroll:
1) Students must be declared journalism majors who have been offered an internship. The Career Services director must approve the internship. All sophomores must consult the director before applying for a credit internship.
2) No credit will be given for internships in advertising, marketing, public relations or the fashion/accessory closet.
3) Students may take the course for 1, 2, 3 or 4 credits but can earn no more than 4 credits total while attending the institute. Only one internship for credit is allowed per semester.

 

For moew information go to the Career Services section.

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Advanced Individualized Study

TBA

TBA

Advanced Individualized Study

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 997

Days: TBA

Room: TBA

To enroll in Advanced Individualized Study, an interested student must find a full-time faculty member to be a sponsor and then must develop and file a syllabus. The syllabus must be approved by the faculty member and the Journalism Director of Undergraduate Graduate Studies (DUGS). It must list, in week by week fashion, all readings and all writing assignments that the student will undertake for the Advanced Individualized Study. Once approved, this syllabus constitutes your "contract" on the project and the student's work will be judged and graded with that in mind.

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Elective Reporting Topics: Sports Writing

Mon 10:00am-1:40pm

TBA

Elective Reporting Topics: Sports Writing

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 204, section 003

Days: Mon 10:00am-1:40pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course will teach you to write about sports for newspapers, magazines and various internet platforms.  You also will read about sports to better understand the historic evolution of the craft and the wide variety of contemporary approaches.

Your assignments will include writing stories on deadline, some from live sports events.  There will be two long-term assignments.  One will be a feature story about a person, team or issue in sports. The other will be a profile of a professional person currently working in sports journalism.


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Elective Reporting Topics: Data Journalism and Investigative Reporting

Wednesday 11:00a-1:30p

Charles Seife

Elective Reporting Topics: Data Journalism and Investigative Reporting

Instructor: Charles Seife

Course ID: JOUR-UA 204, section 001

Days: Wednesday 11:00a-1:30p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

This four-point course will both survey what the emerging field of data journalism is about and plunge students into the practice of it.  Students will learn how to find useful documents and other sources of data, extract meaningful information from large data sets, prepare data for public use, and make it possible for consumers of the news to interact with the data. They will also learn how to use data to perform investigative journalism. Outstanding examples of data journalism from around the world will be studied -- and the techniques those pieces used will be added to students' arsenals. A final project will test students’ skills in using data to produce publishable-quality journalism.  

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Methods and Practice: Point of View

Fri 12:20p-4:00p

James McBride

Methods and Practice: Point of View

Instructor: James McBride

Course ID: JOUR-UA 202, section 001

Days: Fri 12:20p-4:00p

Room: 20 Cooper Square,652

» Syllabus (PDF)

Be ready to write longhand. No computers. No cell phones in class. Pencil and
yellow legal sized paper only. Please be on time. Bring a jacket and a metro card.
For the first class, there is absolute silence when you enter the room. No
talking. Not even to say hello to your neighbor. You want to hear a hello? Here it
is: Hello. Now, no talking for the first ten minutes of class. It sounds stupid, but it
is our first exercise.

Good writing is all about finding the right detail or set of details that will show, not
tell, the event to the listener. You are always fighting gravity, always fighting the reader
who will close the paper, book, magazine and tune you out. We will focus on placing you
in the right mental place to find the details that will tell the story, from your perspective, in
a way that is honest to your truth and hold the reader.

There will be some reading aloud in class. There will be no bloodlettings. If
you’re willing to fail, you will be successful. If you’re already a journalistic success, this
isn’t the class for you. Remember, writing is the act of continually failing at excellence,
and uniformity is the ceiling against which great writing will forever bump. The mid term
and final will be your writing.

Before each class, you will be expected to read the following excerpts from “A
Nietzsche Reader” (Penguin) translated by R. J. Hollingdale. They are not long, but they
are important. We may alter this list based on my assessment of your abilities . Reading
assignments in Gary Smith and Micheal Herr’s books, as well as our Marvel Comic
class, will be assigned as we go deeper into the semester and I am able to assess your
abilities.

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism (lecture)

Tues/Thur 11:00-12:15

Yvonne Latty

Investigating Journalism (lecture)

Instructor: Yvonne Latty

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 001

Days: Tues/Thur 11:00-12:15

Room: GCASL (238 Thompson Street), Room C95

» Syllabus (PDF)

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

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Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 8:00am-9:15am

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 002

Days: Wed 8:00am-9:15am

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 9:30am-10:45am

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 003

Days: Wed 9:30am-10:45am

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 8:00am-9:15am

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 004

Days: Wed 8:00am-9:15am

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 9:30am-10:45am

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 005

Days: Wed 9:30am-10:45am

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 4:55pm-6:10pm

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 006

Days: Wed 4:55pm-6:10pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 6:20pm-7:35pm

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 007

Days: Wed 6:20pm-7:35pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thur 8:00am - 9:15am

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 008

Days: Thur 8:00am - 9:15am

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thur 1:10am-2:25pm

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 010

Days: Thur 1:10am-2:25pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 750

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thur 5:30pm-6:45pm

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 012

Days: Thur 5:30pm-6:45pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 655

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thur 4:55pm-6:10pm

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 013

Days: Thur 4:55pm-6:10pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 652

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thur 6:20pm-7:35pm

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 014

Days: Thur 6:20pm-7:35pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 652

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Fri 11:00am-12:15pm

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 018

Days: Fri 11:00am-12:15pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 652

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Journalistic Inquiry

Mon/Wed 3:40p-5:30p

Frankie Edozien

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Frankie Edozien

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101, Section 001

Days: Mon/Wed 3:40p-5:30p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.

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Description
You are going to learn to think, act and write like a journalist.
This course will provide an introduction to the basic principles of research, reporting and writing the news. You will be introduced to a variety of ways in which we work in this fast paced, deadline driven business - from writing in the traditional newspaper pyramid style to opinion and feature writing to working for broadcast, and new media. You will do lots of writing because the only way to work on your skills is to practice it over and over.

To be a good reporter you have to be informed about what's happening in the world around you. For this class, you have to read The New York Times, New York Daily News and The New York Post every day. You must watch at least 15 minutes of television news or listen to news radio a day. You must also scan the free papers. (Metro & AM NEW YORK) Once a week you will have a brief news quiz on the big stories of the week and your score will count toward your final grade.

In each class one or two students will take turns leading "Newscheck," which is a discussion on a story of their choosing from the front pages of The New York Times. Everyone must participate in the discussion.
Working journalists will visit throughout the semester. You will be expected to ask well thought out questions and take notes because you will have to write a 600-word story on each newsroom visitor. These stories will be due the day after they are assigned.

We will start out with obits and profiles where you will learn the nuances of storytelling and build up to writing a 1,000-word final news story on an issue of your choosing. This story should be good enough to be published. You will cover news events. We will get into this city's diverse colorful neighborhoods and find stories and spend lots of time exploring and hunting down news in New York City.

If a big story breaks, prepare to cover it. On any given day in the newsroom you have no idea what is going to happen. Be flexible! I can guarantee you that things will change as we go through our semester.

[x] close.

Journalistic Inquiry

Tues/Thur 6:20pm - 8:10

Fran Stern

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Fran Stern

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101, Section 002

Days: Tues/Thur 6:20pm - 8:10

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.

[x] close.

Journalistic Inquiry

Mon/Wed 9:00am-10:50am

Frankie Edozien

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Frankie Edozien

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101, Section 003

Days: Mon/Wed 9:00am-10:50am

Room: 20 Cooper Square

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.

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Course Description

To fully prepare you for a career as a journalist, you need to get down to basics. In this class, we’re going to analyze stories from the ground up—beginning with idea generation, continuing to interviewing fundamentals, all the way up to writing, rewriting and the editing process. We’ll spend some time in the classroom, looking at stories and analyzing construction and style, and then we’ll hit the streets to do some hands-on experience including man-on-the-streets, covering events, etc. The goal: By semester’s end, you’ll be comfortable pitching ideas in class and on paper, producing a story on deadline (tweaking it to work for print, broadcast and—even—online) and approaching strangers and expert sources for comment. We’ll do all of this in 15 weeks. The class will be full of interesting experiences, including a police ridealong, coverage of local meetings and interviewing the real people that make this city great.

 

[x] close.

The Beat: Covering Gen Y aka Quarterlifers

Tues 2:00p-5:40p

Mary W. Quigley

The Beat: Covering Gen Y aka Quarterlifers

Instructor: Mary W. Quigley

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201, Section 001

Days: Tues 2:00p-5:40p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

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Relationships: transformed.  Professions: redefined. Technology: exploding. Privacy: what privacy? The future: a world where time-honored maps and models have become useless.

 Fascinating stuff to think and write about, and who better than you, to do it?  You are GenY, the 80 million people aged 18-30, the first generation with a completely digital take on living. 

“Emerging adults” have become a hot topic in both the media and academia:  Boomerang kids who move back home after graduation, quarter-life crises about careers—or lack thereof, postponing long-term relationships, sexual economics, wanting more time to play before “settling down,” looking for emotional as well as economic payoff from a career, and more.

 In "Covering Gen Y," we will examine such issues as romantic, family and community relationships, the world of work, religion and spirituality, the impact of technology, lifestyles,and... well, you decide. You will write for the class website http://genyu.net/ and your individual beat blog, and be guided in doing a multimedia final project.

Last time around several class pieces got published including one by a student who went on a “technology diet”  and another’s lament about her mother wanting to friend her on Facebook.

Prof. Mary Quigley writes and blogs about Gen Y issues.

[x] close.

The Beat: Foreign Reporting from NYC

Tues 3:10p - 6:50p

Mohamad Bazzi

The Beat: Foreign Reporting from NYC

Instructor: Mohamad Bazzi

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201, Section 002

Days: Tues 3:10p - 6:50p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

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This course will teach you the fundamentals of international news reporting and writing. You will learn to write clearly and concisely, and to produce news stories on deadline. These are skills you will need to master no matter what medium you work in—newspapers, websites, magazines, TV or radio—and whether you aspire to report on local, national or international topics.

 

Throughout the course, we will focus on news and beat reporting because they are the backbone of journalism. We will learn by doing, with reporting and writing assignments inside and outside class. Our lab will be New York City, which is rich in stories that can challenge the most seasoned reporters. We will focus on story organization, interview techniques, developing sources, research methods, and grammar and style. Through classroom discussions, field trips and guest speakers, we will explore journalistic practices and how they are changing. We will discuss news judgment, ethical standards, fairness and balance, writing for different audiences, and the role of journalists in society. We will also discuss the challenges facing foreign correspondents today and how the news industry can sustain international reporting at a time of great upheaval in the media.

[x] close.

The Beat: Reporting the City

Wed 11:00am-2:40pm

Frankie Edozien

The Beat: Reporting the City

Instructor: Frankie Edozien

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201, Section 003

Days: Wed 11:00am-2:40pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

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All semester long we will cover New York City from Riverdale to Far Rockaway.  It’s government, its budgets, its elections its restaurants, courts, neighborhoods, healthcare, all are part of our portfolio.

From Day 1, we are metro reporters who will hone our craft covering the biggest and most vibrant municipality in the nation. You will learn to research report and write authoritatively on New York City and all its problems and issues.

This is not a lecture class per se, so you will be out covering stories all over the Big Apple and then bringing them back to write on deadline. I will stress the news feature which will require a good amount of reporting before a piece is turned in but don’t be surprised if you are asked to go cover something on our beat on deadline.

You will sharpen your interviewing techniques and learn to follow up breaking news with insightful analytical pieces to go to the heart of the issue.  You will develop a keen eye for detail and your copy must reflect the details of each piece so readers are transported to the scene through your writing.

To be an effective metro reporter you must be a local news junkie, so scouring the big dailies is a must for this class, hence the New York Times, New York Daily News and the New York Post are must-reads before class. In addition to the free papers like AM New York and Metro.

[x] close.

The Beat: Money $ Power

Mon 8:00am-11:40am

Phil Rosenbaum

The Beat: Money $ Power

Instructor: Phil Rosenbaum

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201, Section 004

Days: Mon 8:00am-11:40am

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

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Learning how the business world works and being able to write about it in clear and simple language is a valuable skill, even if you don’t go into financial journalism. From meltdowns on Wall Street to the mortgage crisis, Internet stocks and student debt, it all has a major impact on your life. That’s the bottom line. We will read between the lines to make sense of it. The world is our newsroom. We will develop and sharpen our research, reporting and writing in the classroom and on assignment in the field. We will meet industry leaders in everything from technology to entertainment as the business world unfolds before us.

[x] close.

The Beat: Hyphenated New York

Wed 2:30pm-6:10pm

Vivien Orbach-Smith

The Beat: Hyphenated New York

Instructor: Vivien Orbach-Smith

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201, Section 005

Days: Wed 2:30pm-6:10pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

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Many New Yorkers live in two worlds: the cultures that spawned them, and the international city they call home. In this intensive skills course, you will zero in on a neighborhood/community in which New Yorkers determinedly straddle and embrace dual identities, bringing vibrancy and diversity to this city. You may cover your chosen beat through a variety of lenses, such as:
• Zeroing in on individuals who have achieved success and others who struggle;
• Profiling local institutions and businesses;
• Examining a neighborhood's/community’s historical and political underpinnings;
• Focusing on a community's or individual’s cultural/professional contributions.

Your beat may be a community defined by its residents' lands of origin (the Russians of Brighton Beach, Koreans of "Koreatown" [Manhattan], Albanians of Arthur Avenue], Indians of "Curry Row" [Manhattan], Irish of Woodlawn [Queens]), or by their race, religion, ethnicity or identity (Harlem USA, Chassidic Crown Heights, Downtown LGBT). Whether your story is about a place or an individual, an organization or an event, your writing must always capture the human side of the news- the heart of feature journalism.
You will be guided in coming up with and pursuing great, fresh story ideas within your beat, in writing four graded pieces (three shorter ones and one more in-depth final), and in finding appropriate venues to pitch them. (Getting clips – not just grades - is one of the aims of this course.) The goal here is learning how to craft strong, captivating stories featuring memorable characters and settings - with much emphasis upon resourceful newsgathering and responsible presentation of facts and events, vivid color and detail, coherent and graceful structure, and impeccable mechanics (spelling, grammar, punctuation). A key focus of your reporting and writing will be to broaden your readers’ perspective (and your own) on the cultural/ethnic/socioeconomic milieu of your subjects.
This class will provide you with opportunities to write stories that are genuinely publishable, on subjects that genuinely interest you. You will be encouraged to write creatively and gorgeously, and even to try to change the world…but your product must retain the clarity, concision and precision that were drummed into you in your basic reporting classes, stopping far short of “fan-like,” gushy prose, blinding passions, or
fictional license.

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The Beat: Media Criticism

Thur 6:00p-9:40p

Farai Chideya

The Beat: Media Criticism

Instructor: Farai Chideya

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201, Section 006

Days: Thur 6:00p-9:40p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry.  Media Criticism students only.

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

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This course will serve as an introduction to various schools of media criticism and ways in which different types of media can be interpreted. What is the traditional role of the journalist and how is it changing?  What new theoretical capacities must be analyzed in order to understand the current state of media? This course will look at early critiques of media to the present and will incorporate critical analysis form a variety of perspectives from critical discourse to ideological criticism to market and public journalism based models. While many pundits are sure that modern news media is in a state of flux, few are fully informed of earlier critiques of media from Marx to Dewey to the New Journalists of the 1960’s, each of which provided a critical lens for analyzing journalism and media. In this course through a variety of writing assignments, in-class and take home critiques, and through serious critical analysis of modern media in all of its various permutations students will analyze the ways in which media can be studied.  Ideally students will leave the class with a set of critical tools to use in analyzing mass media and the inherent difficulties facing major news organizations in all of their various permutations.

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The Beat: TV-NY

Thur 2:30p - 6:10p

Jason Maloney

The Beat: TV-NY

Instructor: Jason Maloney

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201, Section 007

Days: Thur 2:30p - 6:10p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry. 

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

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The Beat: TV-NY

Mon 6:20p - 10:00p

Adrian Mihai

The Beat: TV-NY

Instructor: Adrian Mihai

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201, Section 008

Days: Mon 6:20p - 10:00p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry. 

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

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Advanced Reporting: On the Road in the City

Wed 9:30am-1:10pm

David Dent

Advanced Reporting: On the Road in the City

Instructor: David Dent

Course ID: JOUR-UA 301, Section 002

Days: Wed 9:30am-1:10pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, The Beat

This is the Capstone course. Subject matter varies from section to section, but the basic skeleton of the course is the same across sections: the emphasis is on development of the ability to produce writing and reporting within a sophisticated longform story structure. The course involves query writing, topic research and reading, interviewing, and repeated drafts and rewrites, leading to a full-length piece of writing aimed at a publishable level and the ability of the student to present the reporting orally.

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In On The Road in the City, students will go on a series of journeys throughout the city in search of snippets of ordinary life that say something extraordinary about the city and humanity. In the process, students will be in pursuit of the seeds of cultural change. The mission and challenge will be to present those seeds and portraits of life with prose that gives the reader a sense of making the same discoveries. You will also read three books that employ "road" journalism in different ways. The semester will culminate in your own major project that will require you to journey with a social or cultural world of New York.

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Advanced Reporting: Writing About Home

Fri 10:00am-1:40pm

Frank Flaherty

Advanced Reporting: Writing About Home

Instructor: Frank Flaherty

Course ID: JOUR-UA 301, Section 003

Days: Fri 10:00am-1:40pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, The Beat

This is the Capstone course. Subject matter varies from section to section, but the basic skeleton of the course is the same across sections: the emphasis is on development of the ability to produce writing and reporting within a sophisticated longform story structure. The course involves query writing, topic research and reading, interviewing, and repeated drafts and rewrites, leading to a full-length piece of writing aimed at a publishable level and the ability of the student to present the reporting orally.

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The topic of this Capstone course is home, in all its guises. Home is a rich journalistic topic because it sits at the convergence of so many important things -- shelter, aspiration, self-expression, family, love, hate, childhood, adulthood. Home is where the hearth is, but also where the heart is.

In this course, a student might write about a lighthouse keeper and his life of solitude, nuns in a convent in the Bronx, a family that lives on a bobbing houseboat by the Hudson River piers, or a young couple who work as live-in caretakers at the Edgar Allen Poe House. Homes and their inhabitants are infinitely varied. There are nursing homes, squats, and artist communes; there are immigrants whose homes are statements of their foreign cultures and values; there are nannies whose homes are in fact other people’s homes.

Because our homes reveal our values, dreams and interests, an article about a person’s home is also an article about that person. Imagine a young techno geek, gripped by his ambition to launch an Internet startup; his distracted, obsessed consciousness is perfectly reflected in his apartment strewn with software code and electronic devices and hardly a place to sit. Or imagine a group of nuns who decide to put a green roof on their convent to satisfy their ecological beliefs. Or imagine an artist who lives for her art, who has an all-white apartment -- and who is happy to explain what her vision of beauty is.

 

 

 

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Advanced Reporting: Entrepreneurial New York

Mon 4:55pm-8:35pm

Jessica Seigel

Advanced Reporting: Entrepreneurial New York

Instructor: Jessica Seigel

Course ID: JOUR-UA 301, Section 004

Days: Mon 4:55pm-8:35pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 652

Prerequisites: Foundations, The Beat

This is the Capstone course. Subject matter varies from section to section, but the basic skeleton of the course is the same across sections: the emphasis is on development of the ability to produce writing and reporting within a sophisticated longform story structure. The course involves query writing, topic research and reading, interviewing, and repeated drafts and rewrites, leading to a full-length piece of writing aimed at a publishable level and the ability of the student to present the reporting orally.

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They’re young, they’re ambitious and they’ve gone rogue. In today’s fast-changing “flux” economy, entrepreneurs are forging a new way of creating, living and working, from techies and fashion designers to digital publishers and Off Broadway producers. In this course, you’ll report from the start-up front lines, choosing among topics such as: arts, fashion, food, green, social/activist entrepreneurship, and technology. You’ll learn to blend lively reporting on personalities and trends with the nuts and bolts of the money-side, from how to judge if a company is viable to assessing the competition. How do you separate braggarts, wannabes and vaporware from the real up-and-comers? How do you report what’s new in context of what’s been? How do you balance stylish prose and vivid creative content with business info? You’ll find out by sharpening your interviewing and reporting skills, while developing your own unique narrative voice in magazine style. To build up to your 3,000-word Capstone project, you’ll write shorter, related features including a trend report, quickie Q & A, mini profile, story query and your own “elevator pitch.” Interested students may also try first-person narratives on launching your own start up (or at least trying.) In the past, students have written about movers, shakers and up-and-comers in sour pickling, gaming, sneaker design, DJing, theatrical improv,  artisanal cheese, top blogs, professional gambling, S&M, bartending school scams, restaurants from green to meat-centric, and much more. 

 

Professor Bio: Jessica Seigel has covered arts, business and technology as a columnist and staffer for The Chicago Tribune, Brill’s Content and Pink Magazine. Her start-up, fashion, and tech coverage has also appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Marketplace Public Radio and NPR.

 

 

 

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Advanced Reporting: Advanced TV Reporting

Mon 2:00pm-5:40pm

Marlene Sanders

Advanced Reporting: Advanced TV Reporting

Instructor: Marlene Sanders

Course ID: JOUR-UA 301, Section 005

Days: Mon 2:00pm-5:40pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, The Beat

This is the Capstone course. Subject matter varies from section to section, but the basic skeleton of the course is the same across sections: the emphasis is on development of the ability to produce writing and reporting within a sophisticated longform story structure. The course involves query writing, topic research and reading, interviewing, and repeated drafts and rewrites, leading to a full-length piece of writing aimed at a publishable level and the ability of the student to present the reporting orally.

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In previous classes, students have learned the rudiments of story selection, writing and shooting.  This class advances those skills, with the added pressure of meeting real deadlines; i.e., producing pieces that air on a live, weekly news broadcast.  Stories will gradually grow in complexity over the semester.

Class one. Explanation of what the students will be expected to do during the semester, including how grades will be determined.  Discussion of types of stories to be done and  how they should be researched and presented to the professor for approval.  Students are instructed to bring in story ideas by the next session.  There will be attention to interviewing skills. All story ideas must be accompanied by a list of questions to be asked.

Students are required to do 4 stories of normal length and one more complicated, longer final piece.

 

 

 

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Journalism Ethics and First Amendment Law

Wed 6:20pm-8:50pm

David A. Kaplan

Journalism Ethics and First Amendment Law

Instructor: David A. Kaplan

Course ID: JOUR-UA 502.002

Days: Wed 6:20pm-8:50pm

Room: TBA

» Syllabus (PDF)

SPRING SEMESTERS ONLY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This course is designed to acquaint students with the basic protections and restrictions of the law as they apply to the media, as well as the ethical problems and dilemmas journalists face. First Amendment rights and legal and ethical responsibilities and limitations will be examined and discussed. The course will look at these questions from five viewpoints: from (i) the practical view of a journalist doing his job with (ii) heavy consideration of ethical imperatives, and (iii) from a legal prospective, all the while (iv) considering the rules in a public policy context- are they fair and appropriate in our society? -- while (v) noting the historical context in which they arise. Significant court cases and fundamental legal rules as well as past ethical scandals and issues will be explored in the context of political and historical realities, and in terms of journalistic standards and practices; contemporary media law issues and ethical problems and guidelines will also be focused on. Among the basic First Amendment issues which will be examined are libel, invasion of privacy, prior restraints, newsgathering and newsgathering torts, and the reporter's privilege; some of the ethical issues to be explored include objectivity in reporting, bias and transparency, conflicts of interest, and fair dealings with subjects, sources and advertisers.


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Advanced Reporting: TV Magazine

F 10:00am - 1:40pm

Vanessa Roth

Advanced Reporting: TV Magazine

Instructor: Vanessa Roth

Course ID: JOUR-UA 301.006

Days: F 10:00am - 1:40pm

Room: 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, The Beat

This is the Capstone course. Subject matter varies from section to section, but the basic skeleton of the course is the same across sections: the emphasis is on development of the ability to produce writing and reporting within a sophisticated longform story structure. The course involves query writing, topic research and reading, interviewing, and repeated drafts and rewrites, leading to a full-length piece of writing aimed at a publishable level and the ability of the student to present the reporting orally.

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In previous classes, students have learned the rudiments of story selection, writing and shooting.  This class advances those skills, with the added pressure of meeting real deadlines; i.e., producing pieces that air on a live, weekly news broadcast.  Stories will gradually grow in complexity over the semester.

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Journalistic Inquiry

Mon/Wed

Phil Rosenbaum

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Phil Rosenbaum

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101, Section 002

Days: Mon/Wed

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.

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Journalistic Inquiry

Mon/Wed 10:00am-11:50am

Frankie Edozien

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Frankie Edozien

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101, Section 003

Days: Mon/Wed 10:00am-11:50am

Room: 20 Cooper Square

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.

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Course Description

To fully prepare you for a career as a journalist, you need to get down to basics. In this class, we’re going to analyze stories from the ground up—beginning with idea generation, continuing to interviewing fundamentals, all the way up to writing, rewriting and the editing process. We’ll spend some time in the classroom, looking at stories and analyzing construction and style, and then we’ll hit the streets to do some hands-on experience including man-on-the-streets, covering events, etc. The goal: By semester’s end, you’ll be comfortable pitching ideas in class and on paper, producing a story on deadline (tweaking it to work for print, broadcast and—even—online) and approaching strangers and expert sources for comment. We’ll do all of this in 15 weeks. The class will be full of interesting experiences, including a police ridealong, coverage of local meetings and interviewing the real people that make this city great.

 

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Journalistic Inquiry

Tues/Thur 12:30pm-2:20pm

Fran Stern

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Fran Stern

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101, Section 004

Days: Tues/Thur 12:30pm-2:20pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.

---

Course Description

To fully prepare you for a career as a journalist, you need to get down to basics. In this class, we’re going to analyze stories from the ground up—beginning with idea generation, continuing to interviewing fundamentals, all the way up to writing, rewriting and the editing process. We’ll spend some time in the classroom, looking at stories and analyzing construction and style, and then we’ll hit the streets to do some hands-on experience including man-on-the-streets, covering events, etc. The goal: By semester’s end, you’ll be comfortable pitching ideas in class and on paper, producing a story on deadline (tweaking it to work for print, broadcast and—even—online) and approaching strangers and expert sources for comment. We’ll do all of this in 15 weeks. The class will be full of interesting experiences, including a police ridealong, coverage of local meetings and interviewing the real people that make this city great.

 

[x] close.

» Undergraduate Media Criticism

Journalism Seminar: The Art of Opinion Writing & Polemic

Mon 2:00pm-4:30pm

Katie Roiphe

Journalism Seminar: The Art of Opinion Writing & Polemic

Instructor: Katie Roiphe

Course ID: JOUR-UA 401, section 001

Days: Mon 2:00pm-4:30pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 700

» Syllabus (PDF)

The Art of Opinion Writing & Polemic

polemic  
Etymology: French polémique, from Middle French, from polemique controversial, from Greek polemikos warlike, hostile, from polemos war; perhaps akin to Greek pelemizein to shake. 1 a : an aggressive attack on or refutation of the opinions or principles of another b : the art or practice of disputation or controversy.

How does one break into the current arena of cultural debate and internet flurries of gossip and analysis?  How does one craft a charismatic and forceful opinion piece, or a long polemic? This course will examine the art  and history of opinion writing or polemic from Milton’s Satan to Christopher Hitchens. We will closely examine the construction of great and powerful and flamboyant and splashy and cranky arguments, and learn the practical skills  involved in writing a successful op-ed or stylish contrarian piece. We will examine and analyze various kinds of authority and how one projects them. We will entertain the idea of writing an ‘unbalanced’ piece as a virtue, and discuss how one generates the crazy confidence required for bravura performance in polemic. This is both a rigorous writing and reading class;  both an academic exploration of the uses of rhetoric and a practical class in a set of skills very useful in the current marketplace.

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Journalism & Society: Women and the Media

Tues 2:30pm-5:00pm

Carol Sternhell

Journalism & Society: Women and the Media

Instructor: Carol Sternhell

Course ID: JOUR-UA 503, section 001

Days: Tues 2:30pm-5:00pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

Women & the Media is a collaborative seminar designed to examine the complex relationship
(or different, contradictory relationships) between those humans we call “women” and those
forms of discourse we call “media.” We will consider women both as subjects and objects, as
artists and models, as creators of “media” in its many forms and as media’s creations. What
does our culture’s “media” tell us about its ideas of gender? What, if anything, does our gender
tell us about our readings of “media”? Student participation in this seminar is key: students are
expected to attend all sessions, to complete all the reading (there's lots of reading!), to
participate actively in discussion, and to lead one of the class sessions themselves. Leading a
class means opening the day’s conversation with a presentation, critiquing and elaborating on
the assigned reading, bringing in additional relevant material, and suggesting questions or
issues that seem particularly interesting or troublesome. The purpose of the course is to
develop our critical and self-critical faculties as journalists, media critics, consumers of media,
and women or men—to think clearly, challenge our pet assumptions, and have fun.
Along with attendance and informed class participation, students are required to conduct a miniresearch
project and present their findings to the class. I want you to pick a “women and media”
topic that really interests you and then report the hell out of it. If you’re interested in the effect of
music videos on teenage girls, for instance, you would first put together an extensive
bibliography of what has already been written on the subject. You would figure out what the key
questions in the field were: do media images affect teens’ behavior or not, and how can anyone
tell? You might interview some of the leading researchers in the area and tell us what they say.
You’ll certainly want to read the most important books/articles on your subject. A paper is not
required; instead, students will present their findings to the class during our last three sessions.

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Journalism & Society: Minorities in the Media

Wed1:00p-3:30p

Pamela Newkirk

Journalism & Society: Minorities in the Media

Instructor: Pamela Newkirk

Course ID: JOUR-UA 503, section 002

Days: Wed1:00p-3:30p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

It has been 40 years since President Johnson’s National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders released its findings on the civil unrest that erupted in urban areas across the nation. The panel, commonly referred to as the Kerner Commission, concluded that we are living in two nations, “black, white, separate and unequal,” and devoted an entire chapter to the impact the media had on the nation’s race relations. “We believe that the media have thus far failed to report adequately on the causes and consequences of civil disorders and the underlying problems of race relations,” the report said. It added: “The media report and write from the standpoint of a white man’s world. The ills of the ghetto, the difficulties of life there, the Negro’s burning sense of grievance, are seldom conveyed.”
The report criticized as “shockingly backward” the industry’s failure to hire, train and promote African Americans. At the time, fewer than five percent of the newsroom jobs in the United States were held by African Americans. Today, despite the progress that’s been made in the hiring and coverage of African Americans and other so-called minorities, many critics say that the Kerner Report findings continue to resonate today. With the report as a backdrop, we will examine the portrayals of racial and ethnic minorities in the media, paying particular attention to African Americans – the subject of the Kerner Report – but also others, including Latinos, Asians, women, and gays and lesbians.

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Journalism & Society: Covering the Earth

Wednesday 10:00p-12:50

Dan Fagin

Journalism & Society: Covering the Earth

Instructor: Dan Fagin

Course ID: JOUR-UA 503, section 003

Days: Wednesday 10:00p-12:50

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

Environmental journalism is hot again, and not only because the climate is warming – though that helps. As web-based platforms increasingly dominate mass media, what specific forms should the “new” environmental journalism take? This class will begin by tracing the development of traditional environmental journalism from John Muir to John McPhee and will then look closely at how the field is adapting to a fast-changing media landscape. With the help of guests and timely readings, we will confront thorny questions about environmental advocacy, citizen media, issue framing, risk balancing and the scientific process. And yes, we will produce stories that matter on the biggest news beat of all. This advanced seminar will include intensive journalistic writing assignments, as well as extensive readings for in-class discussion.

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Journalism as Literature: Learning from the Best to be the Best

Tues 11:00a-1:30p

Michael Norman

Journalism as Literature: Learning from the Best to be the Best

Instructor: Michael Norman

Course ID: JOUR-UA 504, section 001

Days: Tues 11:00a-1:30p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

Learning from The Best To Be The Best is a survey of some of the most entertaining and well-written literary journalism of the last two centuries. We will read these articles and book excerpts carefully - "deep reading," it is called - to discover how good writers take basic journalism and enliven it with literary technique. We want to catalog as much of that technique and structure as we can so that we can "steal it," appropriate the devices for our own work. Students will work in teams; each week a team will "present" the readings and incite a discussion with the rest of the class. There will be some three to five formal academic papers in which students will be asked to demonstrate their understanding of the material, and there will be a number of "creative" assignments as well. The main text for the course is an excellent anthology of non-fiction: The Art of Fact by Kerrane and Yagoda..

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Issues and Ideas - Reporting in the Line of Fire: Issues in Covering the Middle East

Mon 3:45-6:15

Mohamad Bazzi

Issues and Ideas - Reporting in the Line of Fire: Issues in Covering the Middle East

Instructor: Mohamad Bazzi

Course ID: JOUR-UA 505, section 001

Days: Mon 3:45-6:15

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

The Middle East is in the headlines every day. But the coverage is often bewildering, focusing on the latest death toll in Iraq, a terrorist bombing, or an ongoing political crisis. There is little historical or political context in most of this coverage.

This course will provide students with an understanding of contemporary issues in the Middle East (such as the rise of militant Islam; the roots of Sunni-Shia tension; the failure of Arab nationalism; terrorism versus national resistance; the problem of the nation-state) by reading works that combine history, political analysis, and narrative journalism. This historical and political background will help students to eventually write about the region with depth and nuance, and to evaluate the coverage that they read.

We will also discuss the challenges of reporting from a region with competing narratives, authoritarian regimes that have little respect for a free press, and places where journalists must work under constant danger. We will have occasional guest speakers who have worked as foreign correspondents or editors managing coverage of the region.

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Internship

Fri 1:00pm - 3:00pm

Sylvan Solloway

Internship

Instructor: Sylvan Solloway

Course ID: JOUR-UA 980

Days: Fri 1:00pm - 3:00pm

Room: TBA

DECLARED JOURNALISM MAJORS ONLY Hours Arranged

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry, The Beat

To enroll:
1) Students must be declared journalism majors who have been offered an internship. The Career Services director must approve the internship. All sophomores must consult the director before applying for a credit internship.
2) No credit will be given for internships in advertising, marketing, public relations or the fashion/accessory closet.
3) Students may take the course for 1, 2, 3 or 4 credits but can earn no more than 4 credits total while attending the institute. Only one internship for credit is allowed per semester.

 

For moew information go to the Career Services section.

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Advanced Individualized Study

TBA

TBA

Advanced Individualized Study

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 997

Days: TBA

Room: TBA

To enroll in Advanced Individualized Study, an interested student must find a full-time faculty member to be a sponsor and then must develop and file a syllabus. The syllabus must be approved by the faculty member and the Journalism Director of Undergraduate Graduate Studies (DUGS). It must list, in week by week fashion, all readings and all writing assignments that the student will undertake for the Advanced Individualized Study. Once approved, this syllabus constitutes your "contract" on the project and the student's work will be judged and graded with that in mind.

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Investigating Journalism (lecture)

Tues/Thur 11:00-12:15

Yvonne Latty

Investigating Journalism (lecture)

Instructor: Yvonne Latty

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 001

Days: Tues/Thur 11:00-12:15

Room: GCASL (238 Thompson Street), Room C95

» Syllabus (PDF)

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 8:00am-9:15am

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 002

Days: Wed 8:00am-9:15am

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 9:30am-10:45am

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 003

Days: Wed 9:30am-10:45am

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 8:00am-9:15am

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 004

Days: Wed 8:00am-9:15am

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 9:30am-10:45am

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 005

Days: Wed 9:30am-10:45am

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 4:55pm-6:10pm

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 006

Days: Wed 4:55pm-6:10pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Wed 6:20pm-7:35pm

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 007

Days: Wed 6:20pm-7:35pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thur 8:00am - 9:15am

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 008

Days: Thur 8:00am - 9:15am

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thur 1:00am-2:15pm

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 009

Days: Thur 1:00am-2:15pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thur 1:10am-2:25pm

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 010

Days: Thur 1:10am-2:25pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 750

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thur 4:00pm-5:15pm

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 011

Days: Thur 4:00pm-5:15pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 655

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thur 5:30pm-6:45pm

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 012

Days: Thur 5:30pm-6:45pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 655

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thur 4:55pm-6:10pm

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 013

Days: Thur 4:55pm-6:10pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 652

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Thur 6:20pm-7:35pm

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 014

Days: Thur 6:20pm-7:35pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 652

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Fri 11:00am-12:15pm

TBA

Investigating Journalism Recitation

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 018

Days: Fri 11:00am-12:15pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 652

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

Investigating Journalism, the gateway course for journalism majors, will be an innovative class that will use social media and new media tools to explore great journalism. Students will develop a deeper understanding of this dynamic and challenging field by interacting with journalists in all mediums and exploring their work. Each recitation section will act as a mini newsroom and will be in charge of taping, interviewing and leading discussions with guests who will represent different types of journalism:  police reporters, investigative reporters, foreign correspondents, magazine writers, photojournalists, TV reporters, cultural reporters, bloggers, media critics, national reporters, nonfiction authors, narrative journalists, sports reporters, fashion journalists, producers, reporters under 30, etc. The work of the journalists and students' coverage of their work will be featured on “Investigating Journalism,” our class webzine. We will live tweet all our guests and have a facebook page for discussion that each recitation section will take turns moderating. In addition there will be lectures and readings on the history of journalism. This will be a dynamic class whose mission will be to inspire the next generation of journalists.

Students must register for the lectures and one of the recitation sections. Please be advised that attendance at both lectures each week and your recitation section is mandatory. Expect stringent grading. The pace of the course precludes late admits

[x] close.

Journalistic Inquiry

Mon/Wed 3:40p-5:30p

Frankie Edozien

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Frankie Edozien

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101, Section 001

Days: Mon/Wed 3:40p-5:30p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.

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Description
You are going to learn to think, act and write like a journalist.
This course will provide an introduction to the basic principles of research, reporting and writing the news. You will be introduced to a variety of ways in which we work in this fast paced, deadline driven business - from writing in the traditional newspaper pyramid style to opinion and feature writing to working for broadcast, and new media. You will do lots of writing because the only way to work on your skills is to practice it over and over.

To be a good reporter you have to be informed about what's happening in the world around you. For this class, you have to read The New York Times, New York Daily News and The New York Post every day. You must watch at least 15 minutes of television news or listen to news radio a day. You must also scan the free papers. (Metro & AM NEW YORK) Once a week you will have a brief news quiz on the big stories of the week and your score will count toward your final grade.

In each class one or two students will take turns leading "Newscheck," which is a discussion on a story of their choosing from the front pages of The New York Times. Everyone must participate in the discussion.
Working journalists will visit throughout the semester. You will be expected to ask well thought out questions and take notes because you will have to write a 600-word story on each newsroom visitor. These stories will be due the day after they are assigned.

We will start out with obits and profiles where you will learn the nuances of storytelling and build up to writing a 1,000-word final news story on an issue of your choosing. This story should be good enough to be published. You will cover news events. We will get into this city's diverse colorful neighborhoods and find stories and spend lots of time exploring and hunting down news in New York City.

If a big story breaks, prepare to cover it. On any given day in the newsroom you have no idea what is going to happen. Be flexible! I can guarantee you that things will change as we go through our semester.

[x] close.

Journalistic Inquiry

Tues/Thur 6:20pm - 8:10

Fran Stern

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Fran Stern

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101, Section 002

Days: Tues/Thur 6:20pm - 8:10

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.

[x] close.

Journalistic Inquiry

Mon/Wed 9:00am-10:50am

Frankie Edozien

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Frankie Edozien

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101, Section 003

Days: Mon/Wed 9:00am-10:50am

Room: 20 Cooper Square

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.

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Course Description

To fully prepare you for a career as a journalist, you need to get down to basics. In this class, we’re going to analyze stories from the ground up—beginning with idea generation, continuing to interviewing fundamentals, all the way up to writing, rewriting and the editing process. We’ll spend some time in the classroom, looking at stories and analyzing construction and style, and then we’ll hit the streets to do some hands-on experience including man-on-the-streets, covering events, etc. The goal: By semester’s end, you’ll be comfortable pitching ideas in class and on paper, producing a story on deadline (tweaking it to work for print, broadcast and—even—online) and approaching strangers and expert sources for comment. We’ll do all of this in 15 weeks. The class will be full of interesting experiences, including a police ridealong, coverage of local meetings and interviewing the real people that make this city great.

 

[x] close.

The Beat: Media Criticism

Thur 6:00p-9:40p

Farai Chideya

The Beat: Media Criticism

Instructor: Farai Chideya

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201, Section 006

Days: Thur 6:00p-9:40p

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry.  Media Criticism students only.

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

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This course will serve as an introduction to various schools of media criticism and ways in which different types of media can be interpreted. What is the traditional role of the journalist and how is it changing?  What new theoretical capacities must be analyzed in order to understand the current state of media? This course will look at early critiques of media to the present and will incorporate critical analysis form a variety of perspectives from critical discourse to ideological criticism to market and public journalism based models. While many pundits are sure that modern news media is in a state of flux, few are fully informed of earlier critiques of media from Marx to Dewey to the New Journalists of the 1960’s, each of which provided a critical lens for analyzing journalism and media. In this course through a variety of writing assignments, in-class and take home critiques, and through serious critical analysis of modern media in all of its various permutations students will analyze the ways in which media can be studied.  Ideally students will leave the class with a set of critical tools to use in analyzing mass media and the inherent difficulties facing major news organizations in all of their various permutations.

[x] close.

Journalism Ethics and First Amendment Law

Wed 6:20pm-8:50pm

David A. Kaplan

Journalism Ethics and First Amendment Law

Instructor: David A. Kaplan

Course ID: JOUR-UA 502.002

Days: Wed 6:20pm-8:50pm

Room: TBA

» Syllabus (PDF)

SPRING SEMESTERS ONLY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This course is designed to acquaint students with the basic protections and restrictions of the law as they apply to the media, as well as the ethical problems and dilemmas journalists face. First Amendment rights and legal and ethical responsibilities and limitations will be examined and discussed. The course will look at these questions from five viewpoints: from (i) the practical view of a journalist doing his job with (ii) heavy consideration of ethical imperatives, and (iii) from a legal prospective, all the while (iv) considering the rules in a public policy context- are they fair and appropriate in our society? -- while (v) noting the historical context in which they arise. Significant court cases and fundamental legal rules as well as past ethical scandals and issues will be explored in the context of political and historical realities, and in terms of journalistic standards and practices; contemporary media law issues and ethical problems and guidelines will also be focused on. Among the basic First Amendment issues which will be examined are libel, invasion of privacy, prior restraints, newsgathering and newsgathering torts, and the reporter's privilege; some of the ethical issues to be explored include objectivity in reporting, bias and transparency, conflicts of interest, and fair dealings with subjects, sources and advertisers.


[x] close.

Journalistic Inquiry

Mon/Wed

Phil Rosenbaum

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Phil Rosenbaum

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101, Section 002

Days: Mon/Wed

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.

[x] close.

Journalistic Inquiry

Mon/Wed 10:00am-11:50am

Frankie Edozien

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Frankie Edozien

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101, Section 003

Days: Mon/Wed 10:00am-11:50am

Room: 20 Cooper Square

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.

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Course Description

To fully prepare you for a career as a journalist, you need to get down to basics. In this class, we’re going to analyze stories from the ground up—beginning with idea generation, continuing to interviewing fundamentals, all the way up to writing, rewriting and the editing process. We’ll spend some time in the classroom, looking at stories and analyzing construction and style, and then we’ll hit the streets to do some hands-on experience including man-on-the-streets, covering events, etc. The goal: By semester’s end, you’ll be comfortable pitching ideas in class and on paper, producing a story on deadline (tweaking it to work for print, broadcast and—even—online) and approaching strangers and expert sources for comment. We’ll do all of this in 15 weeks. The class will be full of interesting experiences, including a police ridealong, coverage of local meetings and interviewing the real people that make this city great.

 

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Journalistic Inquiry

Tues/Thur 12:30pm-2:20pm

Fran Stern

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Fran Stern

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101, Section 004

Days: Tues/Thur 12:30pm-2:20pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.

---

Course Description

To fully prepare you for a career as a journalist, you need to get down to basics. In this class, we’re going to analyze stories from the ground up—beginning with idea generation, continuing to interviewing fundamentals, all the way up to writing, rewriting and the editing process. We’ll spend some time in the classroom, looking at stories and analyzing construction and style, and then we’ll hit the streets to do some hands-on experience including man-on-the-streets, covering events, etc. The goal: By semester’s end, you’ll be comfortable pitching ideas in class and on paper, producing a story on deadline (tweaking it to work for print, broadcast and—even—online) and approaching strangers and expert sources for comment. We’ll do all of this in 15 weeks. The class will be full of interesting experiences, including a police ridealong, coverage of local meetings and interviewing the real people that make this city great.

 

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» Business and Economic Reporting

WRR I - BER

T, 8:30am-2:20pm

Adam L. Penenberg

WRR I - BER

Instructor: Adam L. Penenberg

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.001

Days: T, 8:30am-2:20pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

Writing, Research & Reporting I: BER is designed to teach the basic skills you'll need to write news stories for business publications. You'll learn everything from how to write on a daily (or even hourly) deadline for newspapers and wire services to penning short pieces for magazines. The emphasis will be on learning by doing, with regular reporting and writing assignments inside and outside of class. We'll workshop your stories in class, dissect current media coverage, take field trips to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Conference Board and New York Stock Exchange, and analyze the merit and structure of good (and bad) news stories. You'll be expected to stay abreast of the news, and to read The New York Times and Wall Street Journal regularly, as well as a number of business magazines (Fortune, Forbes, BusinessWeek, etc.) and websites. By the end of the semester, you should be able to write snappy ledes and smart nut grafs in your sleep—the first step in becoming a first rate journalist—and have the requisite skills to write tight, informative business stories. (Note: WRII covers longer magazine features.) In addition, we'll be working closely with the Internship Director to prepare you for landing a quality internship.

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Law & Mass Communication - BER

M, 1:30-4:00pm

Stephen D. Solomon

Law & Mass Communication - BER

Instructor: Stephen D. Solomon

Course ID: JOUR-GA 0011.003

Days: M, 1:30-4:00pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

Although the First Amendment appears on its face to prohibit any governmental restrictions on the press, the U.S. Supreme Court in fact balances free and open expression against other vital interests of society. This course begins by examining the struggle against seditious libel (the crime of criticizing government or its officials) that was not won in this country until the landmark decision in New York Times v. Sullivan in 1964. Students will examine freedom of the press through the prism of a rich variety of contemporary conflicts, including libel, newsgathering problems, the right of privacy, prior restraint, and the conflict between free press and fair trial. Readings include a The First Amendment and the Fourth Estate; Make No Law by Anthony Lewis, The Unwanted Gaze by Jeffrey Rosen, and Origins of the Bill of Rights by Leonard Levy. Students write five papers during the semester.

 

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Fieldwork - BER

TBA

Leslie Wayne

Fieldwork - BER

Instructor: Leslie Wayne

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1290.002

Days: TBA

Room: TBA

See instructor for more details.

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Hyperlocal Newsroom (Video)

F, 1-4:40pm

Jason Maloney

Hyperlocal Newsroom (Video)

Instructor: Jason Maloney

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1080.002

Days: F, 1-4:40pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

The basic requirement of the course is to learn how to produce multi-media content, as applied through reporting on the East Village for the Local East Village blog.

 

BER students should register for this section.

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» Cultural Reporting and Criticism

WRRI - CRC

F, 9am-2pm

Mark Schone

WRRI - CRC

Instructor: Mark Schone

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.007

Days: F, 9am-2pm

Room: 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

This is the introductory reporting, research and journalistic writing course for CRC students, teaching cultural journalists the skills and conventions of news and feature reporting for print and multimedia. Students receive short- and long-form reporting assignments with intensive rewriting, and basic training in radio production. Open to CRC students only.

This course teaches cultural journalists the essentials of news reporting: the skills andconventions of journalistic practice across media platforms. Whetheryour reported work is published, posted or broadcast, you’ll need to work from the same ground rules as your editors, producers, sources and readers, and to master a repertoire ofbasic forms.

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Critical Survey

R, 9:30a-1:10pm

TBA

Critical Survey

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1184.001

Days: R, 9:30a-1:10pm

Room: 7th Floor Library

» Syllabus (PDF)

This is a course in reading and writing criticism. Our goal is to introduce ourselves to some of the best cultural critics (mainly of the 20th century); chart the ways in which the nature of 20th-century criticism — and art — have changed; investigate some of the major questions that preoccupy contemporary critics (especially the nature of modernism/postmodernism, high and low culture, irony and sincerity, and the culture wars); and begin to master some forms of critical writing. The paradox of how to develop a critical voice without writing directly about oneself will be explored. Among the critics we'll study are James Agee, Pauline Kael, John Berger, George Orwell, Gilbert Seldes, Susan Sontag, Lionel Trilling, Greil Marcus, Albert Murray, Norman Mailer and Wendy Steiner. Open to CRC students only.

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Cultural Conversation

T, 2-6PM

Susie Linfield

Cultural Conversation

Instructor: Susie Linfield

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1181.001

Days: T, 2-6PM

Room: 7th Floor Library

» Syllabus (PDF)

The primary purpose of this course is to inculcate habits of thinking that are vital to informed and intelligent cultural reporting and criticism. This does not mean that students will be taught "theories" of cultural writing, which they can then apply to their "practice." Rather, the point is that your thought process-as you write a piece, as you prepare to write it, or even before that, as you go through your daily life in a world full of potential subject matter-is an integral part of your work as a writer. We all carry on some kind of conversation with ourselves, and with the people we know, about the culture we live in. As writers, however, our task is to self-consciously translate that private conversation into a public one that connects with readers. In this course I ask you to address two questions that bear on this translation. One is historical: what has been said in the cultural conversation before you came to it? To find your place in the conversation (just as you would have to do if you joined a roomful of people talking) you will need to grapple with cultural issues and debates that go back half a century-debates about the nature of art and criticism, technology and mass media, high culture versus mass culture, art and politics, social groups and cultural difference. The second question is personal: what experiences, ideas, emotions, and prejudices do you bring to the conversation? While conventional news writers are simply expected to put their own attitudes aside, cultural journalists must be conscious of their standpoint and its impact on their observation and judgment. Your credibility and the power of your literary voice depend a good deal on your ability to develop this capacity for self-reflection. Open to CRC students only.

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Topics in Cultural Journalism - Cataclysm

W, 3-7pm

Susie Linfield

Topics in Cultural Journalism - Cataclysm

Instructor: Susie Linfield

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1281.001

Days: W, 3-7pm

Room: 7th Floor Library

» Syllabus (PDF)

TBA

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Cultural Politics and the 2012 Election

M, 3:10p-6:50p

Leslie Savan

Cultural Politics and the 2012 Election

Instructor: Leslie Savan

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.008

Days: M, 3:10p-6:50p

Room: 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

This fall's presidential election promises to be very weird and very important--and a field day for the cultural reporter.  This course will address cultural politics both historically and in the present, i.e. as they play out, in real time, in the fall. Are cultural issues a "distraction" from "real" politics--or are they important expressions of our deepest values? This class will look at how issues such as sex, race, abortion, religion, gay marriage, family values, guns, taxes, crime, and education--as well as concepts such as "elitism" and "freedom"--manifest themselves; we will look, too, at how the press covers such topics. The course will examine why and how Americans are increasingly divided into antagonistic "tribes," and will study contemporary populist critiques of mainstream politics from the left (i.e. Occupy Wall Street) and the right (i.e. the Tea Party). This class's writing assignments will include both reporting and analytic pieces. CRC Priority, others with instructor approval.

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Writing Social Commentary

F, 9am-12:40pm

Charles Taylor

Writing Social Commentary

Instructor: Charles Taylor

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1281.003

Days: F, 9am-12:40pm

Room: 7th Floor Library

» Syllabus (PDF)

The primary goal of this class is to help students bridge the gap between passion and reason in the writing of social commentary. Just as a lawyer acts as an advocate while laying out a persuasive case, the writer who undertakes a piece of social commentary -- whether a piece of criticism, a review, or a polemic -- must be able to present a case while being aware of potential inconsistencies in logic. Our purpose will not be boring evenhandedness but the ability to make a strong, convincing argument free of cant and cliché. Though you will be relying on facts just as a reporter does, you will be required to bring the very things a reporter is trained to exclude: your opinion, an awareness of your prejudices, and the way you have been shaped by your experience. Reading and discussion will focus on cultivating an informed and critical perspective on current social issues and on the ways those issues are presented and shaped by the news media. Writing assignments will emphasize building a clear and coherent argument, with attention to context and audience.

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» Global and Joint Program Studies

WRRI - GloJo

F, 11am-3:00p

Barbara Borst

WRRI - GloJo

Instructor: Barbara Borst

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.008

Days: F, 11am-3:00p

Room: 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course will teach you the fundamentals of news reporting and writing. You will learn to write clearly and concisely, and to produce news stories on deadline. These are skills you will need to master no matter what medium you work in-newspapers, websites, magazines, TV or radio-and whether you aspire to report on local, national or international topics. During this first half of a two-semester course, we will focus on news and beat reporting because they are the backbone of journalism. We will learn by doing, with reporting and writing assignments inside and outside class. Our lab will be New York City, which is rich in stories that can challenge the most seasoned reporters. We will begin by learning the basics of news reporting: story organization, interview techniques, developing sources, research methods, and grammar and style. Through classroom discussions, field trips and guest speakers, we will explore journalistic practices and how they are changing.

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» Literary Reportage

Literature in a Hurry - WRRI: LitRep

W, 3:00p-6:00p

Brooke Kroeger

Literature in a Hurry - WRRI: LitRep

Instructor: Brooke Kroeger

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.010

Days: W, 3:00p-6:00p

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

New description to come

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Introduction to LitRep

R, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Robert S. Boynton

Introduction to LitRep

Instructor: Robert S. Boynton

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.010

Days: R, 12:00pm-3:00pm

Room: 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

The goal of this course is to help you create a distinctive body of work and, eventually, a capstone piece of literary reportage. It has three basic components. First, it will guide you through the research, reporting and thinking to refine and focus the project you will begin in Portfolio I. Second, it will introduce you to some of the authors, editors and publications of the genre. Third, it will familiarize you with some of the journalistic strategies you will use in your own work.

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How Books are Built: The Basics of NonFiction Narrative

T, 3:30-7pm

Michael Norman

How Books are Built: The Basics of NonFiction Narrative

Instructor: Michael Norman

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1050.001

Days: T, 3:30-7pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

This is a lively seminar about the most difficult aspect of book writing: How to structure a narrative. Through careful reading and exercises, we will attempt to discover how fine non-fiction books are made. We will read five book-length narratives (among them Praying for Sheetrock by Melissa Faye Greene, and The Duke of Deception by Geoff Wolf) then take those books apart, chapter by chapter, to discover what material the writer collected, how and why the writer organized that material and, finally, what structure the writer used to create a compelling narrative that attempts to hold the reader from first page to last. Seminar members, working in teams with protocols supplied by the instructor, will "present" the books for analysis and lead a discussion of them.

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Portfolio

W, 3-6pm

Robert S. Boynton

Portfolio

Instructor: Robert S. Boynton

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.001

Days: W, 3-6pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

The NYU Portfolio Program is designed to educate journalists in a way that is both conservative and revolutionary: Conservative in that it emphasizes knowledge of various journalistic traditions, basic literary skills, and practical outcomes (aka getting published) and revolutionary in that we are going to pursue these goals without primary emphasis on the "boot-camp" model ("skills" courses, "content" courses, etc.) that has dominated journalism education for the last half century. By invitation, we encourage and enable a select group of students to use their NYU Journalism Department experience to develop a coherent, sophisticated body of work.

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» Magazine Writing

WRRI - Magazine

R, 10am-3:50pm

Meryl Gordon

WRRI - Magazine

Instructor: Meryl Gordon

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.002

Days: R, 10am-3:50pm

Room: 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

Magazine editors have always put a premium on in-depth reporting and stylish writing. But in this new environment – with new magazines sprouting on the internet and established magazines charting their website traffic – the ability to write well on deadline has become a priority too.  In this introductory class, you will be exploring New York City and writing about a variety of topics including politics, crime, culture and fashion. Assignments include a mixture of long and short features, and hard news assignments. The goal is to learn to write sparkling prose, dig up news nuggets, and learn to pitch your work. The class also includes a  five-session photojournalism tutorial.

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WRRI - Magazine

R, 10am-3:50pm

Mary W. Quigley

WRRI - Magazine

Instructor: Mary W. Quigley

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.003

Days: R, 10am-3:50pm

Room: 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

This is a professional course, concentrating on the basics of the craft of journalism — coming up with an idea, getting it approved, reporting the facts, organizing the material and writing the story. Students will spend a lot of time looking for story ideas, and pitching them — a critical part of the real-world newsroom experience. Perhaps the biggest emphasis of the class will be on the most important part of journalism: gathering the facts. Students will have many reporting exercises during in-class drill sessions, but will also do a great deal of "live" street reporting. We will rely much more on primary sources — original documents, and especially what people tell us — rather than secondary sources that are better suited for the background that sends us to primary sources.

In drills and in the stories produced outside of class, students will learn the classic styles of organizing and writing, and will begin learning what works best for them on different types of stories. We'll read and analyze many examples of the day's news, looking at what works, what doesn't and why. We'll look at what gets covered, what doesn't, and the impact of both. The ethics of journalism will be a constant undercurrent for all our work and discussions.

In addition to exercises produced during drill sessions, students will do a number of street-reporting assignments. Possible story ideas might cover some aspect of a city agency, the courts, police, the arts, culture, business and sports. The story assignments are not merely drills; goal is to produce stories that can be published. (new paragraph)This class aims to lay the foundation for a career in journalism, extremely challenging but extremely stimulating, with the focus always on best practices for the communications professional in the 21st century.

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WRRI - Magazine

R, 10am-3:50pm

Alexis Gelber

WRRI - Magazine

Instructor: Alexis Gelber

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.011

Days: R, 10am-3:50pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

This is a professional course, concentrating on the basics of the craft of journalism — coming up with an idea, getting it approved, reporting the facts, organizing the material and writing the story. Students will spend a lot of time looking for story ideas, and pitching them — a critical part of the real-world newsroom experience. Perhaps the biggest emphasis of the class will be on the most important part of journalism: gathering the facts. Students will have many reporting exercises during in-class drill sessions, but will also do a great deal of "live" street reporting. We will rely much more on primary sources — original documents, and especially what people tell us — rather than secondary sources that are better suited for the background that sends us to primary sources.

In drills and in the stories produced outside of class, students will learn the classic styles of organizing and writing, and will begin learning what works best for them on different types of stories. We'll read and analyze many examples of the day's news, looking at what works, what doesn't and why. We'll look at what gets covered, what doesn't, and the impact of both. The ethics of journalism will be a constant undercurrent for all our work and discussions.

In addition to exercises produced during drill sessions, students will do a number of street-reporting assignments. Possible story ideas might cover some aspect of a city agency, the courts, police, the arts, culture, business and sports. The story assignments are not merely drills; goal is to produce stories that can be published. (new paragraph)This class aims to lay the foundation for a career in journalism, extremely challenging but extremely stimulating, with the focus always on best practices for the communications professional in the 21st century.

[x] close.

Law & Mass Communication

M, 6:20-8:50pm

George Freeman

Law & Mass Communication

Instructor: George Freeman

Course ID: JOUR-GA 0011.001

Days: M, 6:20-8:50pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course is designed to acquaint students with the basic protections and restrictions of the law as they apply to the media, as well as the ethical problems and dilemmas journalists face. First Amendment rights and legal and ethical responsibilities and limitations will be examined and discussed. The course will look at these questions from five viewpoints: from (i) the practical view of a journalist doing his job with (ii) heavy consideration of ethical imperatives, and (iii) from a legal prospective, all the while (iv) considering the rules in a public policy context -- are they fair and appropriate in our society? -- while (v) noting the historical context in which they arise. Significant court cases and fundamental legal rules as well as past ethical scandals and issues will be explored in the context of political and historical realities, and in terms of journalistic standards and practices; contemporary media law issues and ethical problems and guidelines will also be focused on. Among the basic First Amendment issues which will be examined are libel, invasion of privacy, prior restraints, newsgathering and newsgathering torts, and the reporter's privilege; some of the ethical issues to be explored include objectivity in reporting, bias and transparency, conflicts of interest, and fair dealings with subjects, sources and advertisers.

[x] close.

Press Ethics

M, 7:00-9:30pm

Steve Chung

Press Ethics

Instructor: Steve Chung

Course ID: JOUR-GA 0012.001

Days: M, 7:00-9:30pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course examines the legal rules, ethical concepts and public policy concerns related to
the decisions that journalists must make on a daily basis. With the explosive growth of social
networking and other forms of self-publication, information spreads more quickly than ever,
creating unprecedented opportunities, pressures and potential pitfalls for journalists. In an
ever-changing landscape where it may sometimes appear that anything goes, it is critically
important for journalists to develop the ability to navigate through legal and ethical issues to
build and safeguard the most valuable asset any journalist can possess—credibility and an
unimpeachable reputation.

We will study the rights and restrictions defined by the First Amendment through historical
and modern case law. Case studies of real world examples and hypotheticals will also be
used to raise questions, evaluate and weigh ethical precepts and practical considerations and
consequences.

[x] close.

Storied New York

T, 9-11:30am

Suketu Mehta

Storied New York

Instructor: Suketu Mehta

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1023.001

Days: T, 9-11:30am

Room: 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

New York is the most storied city in America; generations of writers have been entranced by it, and have produced masterpieces in tribute. We will look at the city as a character, in journalism, memoir, fiction, poetry, and film. What is the idea of New York in historical and contemporary imagination, and how different or similar are today's chroniclers of the city from their predecessors? What can we learn about urban reportage from the best practitioners of the genre? We will examine the texts for thematic concerns as well as those of craft. We will look at them as a car mechanic looks at a car; see how sentences are structured so that the text provides pleasure as well as information. And along the way, we will discover the broader possibilities and limitations of nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and film.

[x] close.

Storied New York

T, 3:30p-6:00p

Suketu Mehta

Storied New York

Instructor: Suketu Mehta

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1023.002

Days: T, 3:30p-6:00p

Room: 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

New York is the most storied city in America; generations of writers have been entranced by it, and have produced masterpieces in tribute. We will look at the city as a character, in journalism, memoir, fiction, poetry, and film. What is the idea of New York in historical and contemporary imagination, and how different or similar are today's chroniclers of the city from their predecessors? What can we learn about urban reportage from the best practitioners of the genre? We will examine the texts for thematic concerns as well as those of craft. We will look at them as a car mechanic looks at a car; see how sentences are structured so that the text provides pleasure as well as information. And along the way, we will discover the broader possibilities and limitations of nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and film.

[x] close.

Storied New York

M, 11:00a-1:30p

Perri Klass

Storied New York

Instructor: Perri Klass

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1023.003

Days: M, 11:00a-1:30p

Room: 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

New York is the most storied city in America; generations of writers have been entranced by it, and have produced masterpieces in tribute. We will look at the city as a character, in journalism, memoir, fiction, poetry, and film. What is the idea of New York in historical and contemporary imagination, and how different or similar are today's chroniclers of the city from their predecessors? What can we learn about urban reportage from the best practitioners of the genre? We will examine the texts for thematic concerns as well as those of craft. We will look at them as a car mechanic looks at a car; see how sentences are structured so that the text provides pleasure as well as information. And along the way, we will discover the broader possibilities and limitations of nonfiction, fiction, poetry, and film.

[x] close.

Press Ethics

Monday, 7:00pm-9:30pm

TBA

Press Ethics

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 0012.001

Days: Monday, 7:00pm-9:30pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course examines the legal rules, ethical concepts and public policy concerns related to
the decisions that journalists must make on a daily basis. With the explosive growth of social
networking and other forms of self-publication, information spreads more quickly than ever,
creating unprecedented opportunities, pressures and potential pitfalls for journalists. In an
ever-changing landscape where it may sometimes appear that anything goes, it is critically
important for journalists to develop the ability to navigate through legal and ethical issues to
build and safeguard the most valuable asset any journalist can possess—credibility and an
unimpeachable reputation.

We will study the rights and restrictions defined by the First Amendment through historical
and modern case law. Case studies of real world examples and hypotheticals will also be
used to raise questions, evaluate and weigh ethical precepts and practical considerations and
consequences.

[x] close.

» News and Documentary

WRRI - NewsDoc

W, 10am-3:50pm

Cora Daniels

WRRI - NewsDoc

Instructor: Cora Daniels

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.009

Days: W, 10am-3:50pm

Room: 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

The best journalism flows from logical thinking, solid research, and comprehensive journalism. Through short deadline pieces and longer writing assignments this class will simulate a newsroom and teach you how to think like a journalist. New York City will be your reporting lab and you will be sent out into the city hunting for stories from day one. While the primary focus of this class is print, the skills will give you a strong journalism foundation that can be used in any media.

[x] close.

TV Reporting I

T, 11am-3pm

Marcia Rock

TV Reporting I

Instructor: Marcia Rock

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1040.001

Days: T, 11am-3pm

Room: 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

This beginning course introduces students to field reporting. Students learn to develop story ideas, write to picture, structure a story and conduct interviews and shoot and edit. Beat assignments cover a variety of topics in the neighborhoods of New York. As the course develops, detailed script analysis is combined with in-depth discussions of the completed pieces. Students work in teams of 2-3. They use small DV cameras, linear and non-linear editing systems.

[x] close.

Press Ethics

M, 12:15-2:45PM

Jane Stone

Press Ethics

Instructor: Jane Stone

Course ID: JOUR-GA 0012.002

Days: M, 12:15-2:45PM

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course offers through the case method a critical examination of current and recurring ethical and legal issues in journalism. Areas covered include reporting practices, roles of editors and executives, conflict of interest, sources, defamation and privacy, criminal justice and national security.

[x] close.

Advanced TV Reporting

W, 4-8pm

Marcia Rock

Advanced TV Reporting

Instructor: Marcia Rock

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1175.001

Days: W, 4-8pm

Room: 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

We have several objectives in this class this semester. One is to finish your long piece. The other is to produce a short piece for our Election Special. You will work in groups of 2 for the election stories and then report live from various locations on election night as a follow-up to your reports. We will discuss this in class tonight and you will pitch stories on 9/21. This is very much a workshop class. You will present your work during the various stages of production—developing your story, reviewing your raw tapes, scripts and rough-cuts during class. Each of you will develop a schedule with deadlines for both stories and submit this by 9/28. During class, I will also bring in tapes to discuss that will stimulate discussion of form and content. Classes may run past 8:00 PM as we get more involved in story development so please don't schedule yourself too tightly on Wednesdays. Before you edit your election pieces, I will conduct an AVID session to give you some shortcuts. If you want to work on FCP, you have access to the 504 A computers, but you will compete with all the other students for time on those machines. Our final class is Dec 14. From past experience, that is not enough time to view all projects so I suggest we also meet on the 15th. We can meet in the afternoon as well since formal classes are over on the 14th. If you need the time, we could also have our last meeting on 12/19. Please do not schedule airline tickets before then. We will also pick a date in early February for your film festival screening. We normally have it on a Saturday, be we could try for a Friday. Please choose from Jan 28 or Feb 4. Parents and friends, of course, are invited.

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Video Editing

R, 6:20-10pm

David Spungen

Video Editing

Instructor: David Spungen

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.007

Days: R, 6:20-10pm

Room: 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course is dedicated to the craft of editing and producing for the TV News Magazine
genre, broadcast journalism's long-form storytelling vehicle. The course is broken into
three elements: (1) hands-on non-linear editing - students are given the raw elements from
a story previously broadcast on CBS News (the Diet Project) and edit their version of the
project in a simulated broadcast environment. (2) dissecting video story telling styles in the
news magazine and long-form genre. (3) Integrating these learned editing techniques to the
students’ documentary work. There is class time dedicated to one-on-one editing sessions.

Students may work with AVID, Final Cut Pro 7 or both to do their editing. It is important
to understand that this course is not a “how-to-use editing software”. For what it’s worth,
Professor Spungen is fluent in editing with AVID software and is happy to answer any
AVID related questions. His knowledge of FCP7 is not as strong, however all attempts will
be made to help students with FCP7 questions.

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» Reporting New York

WRRI - RTN/RNY

M, 11am-4:50pm

Yvonne Latty

WRRI - RTN/RNY

Instructor: Yvonne Latty

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.005

Days: M, 11am-4:50pm

Room: 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

This class is your newsroom. You will learn to research, pitch story ideas, find the right angles, hit the streets and write it up on deadline. You will use this nation, rich with culture, diversity, money and power, to learn and practice your skills. Journalism is about people, their stories, the government and services that enable them to live their lives. This class is about finding your voice and embracing your beat with passion, respect and understanding. This is a multimedia class. In the course of our year together you will learn to shoot and edit video, discover the magic of audio and create compelling slideshows, all for the web and for our website, "NYC Pavement Pieces." But remember, the words always come first.

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Law & Mass Communication

R, 9-11:30am

Ruth S. Hochberger

Law & Mass Communication

Instructor: Ruth S. Hochberger

Course ID: JOUR-GA 0011.002

Days: R, 9-11:30am

Room: 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course examines the application of ethical and legal principles to journalistic decision making, in print, broadcast and on-line. Unlike other professionals, journalists must make their ethical decisions rapidly, often without clear guidelines, and on their own, and the results of their decisions are open to public view. Also unlike other professionals, violations of ethical precepts are not punished by professional discipline or revocation of a license. This makes it vital that journalists weigh the value of how and what they choose to report against the potential harm to subjects, sources and society as a whole. The objective of this course is to provide guidance, through consideration of hypothetical and actual situations and analysis of case decisions, in developing a framework to help you make ethical and legal professional choices and to suggest some criteria against which those decisions may be measured.

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Investigative Reporting

T, 6:20-10pm

Joe Calderone

Investigative Reporting

Instructor: Joe Calderone

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.005

Days: T, 6:20-10pm

Room: 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course seeks students interested in learning the skills necessary to produce exclusive, hard-edged, ground-breaking reporting, combining human sources with original, document-based research. Bloggers, Tweeters, aspiring TV talking heads and print reporters will learn how to cut through the noise and produce reporting that stands out, makes a difference.and gives them an edge in a crowded field.

The emphasis is on New York City-based fieldwork resulting in a capstone, semester-long investigative project of your choosing that is worthy of publication. You will learn how to develop ideas for a project, find and cultivate sources, pitch and write the story in a clear, compelling and fair fashion while adhering to the highest standards of accuracy and objectivity. You will see how to mine the records of courthouses, police agencies, property clerks, health agencies, City Hall, campaign finance, tax authorities and other municipal, nonprofit and law-enforcement offices for exclusive material. Your aim will be to produce a story that sheds a light on a little-known or hidden topic with important implications for the public and readers.

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» Reporting the Nation

WRRI - RTN/RNY

M, 11am-4:50pm

Yvonne Latty

WRRI - RTN/RNY

Instructor: Yvonne Latty

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.005

Days: M, 11am-4:50pm

Room: 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

This class is your newsroom. You will learn to research, pitch story ideas, find the right angles, hit the streets and write it up on deadline. You will use this nation, rich with culture, diversity, money and power, to learn and practice your skills. Journalism is about people, their stories, the government and services that enable them to live their lives. This class is about finding your voice and embracing your beat with passion, respect and understanding. This is a multimedia class. In the course of our year together you will learn to shoot and edit video, discover the magic of audio and create compelling slideshows, all for the web and for our website, "NYC Pavement Pieces." But remember, the words always come first.

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Law & Mass Communication

R, 9-11:30am

Ruth S. Hochberger

Law & Mass Communication

Instructor: Ruth S. Hochberger

Course ID: JOUR-GA 0011.002

Days: R, 9-11:30am

Room: 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course examines the application of ethical and legal principles to journalistic decision making, in print, broadcast and on-line. Unlike other professionals, journalists must make their ethical decisions rapidly, often without clear guidelines, and on their own, and the results of their decisions are open to public view. Also unlike other professionals, violations of ethical precepts are not punished by professional discipline or revocation of a license. This makes it vital that journalists weigh the value of how and what they choose to report against the potential harm to subjects, sources and society as a whole. The objective of this course is to provide guidance, through consideration of hypothetical and actual situations and analysis of case decisions, in developing a framework to help you make ethical and legal professional choices and to suggest some criteria against which those decisions may be measured.

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Investigative Reporting

T, 6:20-10pm

Joe Calderone

Investigative Reporting

Instructor: Joe Calderone

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.005

Days: T, 6:20-10pm

Room: 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course seeks students interested in learning the skills necessary to produce exclusive, hard-edged, ground-breaking reporting, combining human sources with original, document-based research. Bloggers, Tweeters, aspiring TV talking heads and print reporters will learn how to cut through the noise and produce reporting that stands out, makes a difference.and gives them an edge in a crowded field.

The emphasis is on New York City-based fieldwork resulting in a capstone, semester-long investigative project of your choosing that is worthy of publication. You will learn how to develop ideas for a project, find and cultivate sources, pitch and write the story in a clear, compelling and fair fashion while adhering to the highest standards of accuracy and objectivity. You will see how to mine the records of courthouses, police agencies, property clerks, health agencies, City Hall, campaign finance, tax authorities and other municipal, nonprofit and law-enforcement offices for exclusive material. Your aim will be to produce a story that sheds a light on a little-known or hidden topic with important implications for the public and readers.

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» Science, Health and Environmental Reporting

WRRI - SHERP

T, 9am-3:20pm

Michael Balter

WRRI - SHERP

Instructor: Michael Balter

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.006

Days: T, 9am-3:20pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

The aim of this course is to develop and enhance your journalistic talents through intensive use of the
tools of the trade. We will specialize in science, health and environment writing and reporting, although
the outlook and skills you will acquire will serve you on any of journalism’s numerous news beats.

You will learn to write and report compelling news stories and news features, and greatly improve your
already existing skills. These will include basic elements of journalism such as how to find story leads,
track down information sources, get and conduct interviews, write with clarity, accuracy and style, and
make the most of the editing process. You will learn to write for the print and electronic media, practice
the art of blogging, and have a brief introduction to podcasting. You will also receive a basic introduction
to shooting and editing video in a series of morning and evening workshops.

In class, there will be a strong focus on discussion, newsroom-style give-and-take, and story pitches,
as well as in-class exercises, group edit sessions and some guest speakers. This is a workshop, so class
attendance is MANDATORY. You will put your new skills into practice with regular assignments. And
some of your best work, honed by group and one-on-one editing sessions, will be considered for the
SHERP webzine, Scienceline.

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Current Topics in SHERP

R, 10am-4:30pm

Dan Fagin

Current Topics in SHERP

Instructor: Dan Fagin

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1017.001

Days: R, 10am-4:30pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

Current Topics in Science, Health and Environmental Journalism

Current Topics in Science, Health and Environmental Journalism introduces students to the world of science journalism by looking at scientific topics that are at the cutting-edge of current research and also have profound implications for the way we live. In other words, they are the raw material for great journalism. As students immerse themselves in some challenging areas of current science, they will read the work of highly accomplished researchers and journalists, and will also hear from them directly in class. The goal throughout is be to understand and adopt the processes that the best science journalists use when they cover controversial science. You will learn how journalists interact with scientists, conduct research, organize information and write stories. Just as importantly, students also sharpen their analytical skills by writing almost every week for the SHERP webzine, Scienceline. Covering an assigned beat, students follow the peer-reviewed journals and other sources to stay on top of the news as it happens.

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Science Literacy & Numeracy

M, 12-3pm

Charles Seife

Science Literacy & Numeracy

Instructor: Charles Seife

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1018.001

Days: M, 12-3pm

Room: 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

Science Literacy and Numeracy aims to give students a historical and literary context for science journalism, and will also introduce them to crucial concepts in statistics, probability and data analysis. The course will be rigorous, with an extensive reading list tracing the development of science journalism and examining the science journalist's role in society. There will also be heavy usage of problem sets and writing assignments aimed at showing students how to recognize "good science" and it's opposite. The course begins with a discussion of the conflict between scientists and non-scientists, and how science journalists are a bridge between the two cultures. Then students explore how society's way of understanding the natural world has changed over the centuries, the modern methods and philosophies of the practice of science, and some issues that affect scientists and scientific journalists that are not dreamt of in those philosophies. A mini-course in numeracy also arms students with the weapons to understand and dissect scientific studies. Using that knowledge, the class then returns to the scientific world to look at how science journalists have plied their craft, and at the pressures they face that make it hard for them to be solid bridges between scientists and non-scientists.

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Science Reporting

R, 2:30-5:30pm

John Rennie

Science Reporting

Instructor: John Rennie

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1180.001

Days: R, 2:30-5:30pm

Room: 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

This advanced SHERP class is intended to give a realistic preview of life as a working science journalist. We will explore the process step by step, from finding a story idea to pitching it to surviving the editing process to making sure the final product is accurate, clear and compelling. We will also look at science journalism from the editor's point of view. Open to third semester SHERP students only.

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Medical Reporting

R, 9:30am-12:30pm

Ivan Oransky, MD

Medical Reporting

Instructor: Ivan Oransky, MD

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1187.001

Days: R, 9:30am-12:30pm

Room: 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

Medical Reporting provides an in-depth look at many of the most important contemporary topics in the always dynamic field of medical journalism, including the biology of cancer, environment-related illness, epidemiology, and the precepts of sound medical research and peer review. Students write several short pieces on journal reports, medical conferences and community health lectures, and one longer, feature-length piece on a health topic of their choice. Medical researchers and prominent journalists are frequent guest speakers. Open to third semester SHERP students only.

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Fieldwork - SHERP

TBA

Apoorva Mandavilli

Fieldwork - SHERP

Instructor: Apoorva Mandavilli

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1290.003

Days: TBA

Room: TBA

Open to third semester SHERP students only.

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» Studio 20

WRRI - Studio20

R, 4-8pm

Jason Samuels

WRRI - Studio20

Instructor: Jason Samuels

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.004

Days: R, 4-8pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

See syllabus for details.

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Studio 1

T, 5:10-9:40pm

Kevin R. Convey

Studio 1

Instructor: Kevin R. Convey

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.009

Days: T, 5:10-9:40pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course will examine the phenomenon of innovation, examining current disruptions in news media, how the industry's failure to innovate in a timely fashion is radically reshaping it, and why innovation is more necessary now than ever. We will look at great journalistic innovators throughout history, the causes and effects of major journalistic innovations -- including innovations in form, style, and content -- and the industry's response to new and disruptive technologies through the years. We will examine what new media are doing to reinvent journalism in the age of the Web and social media.

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Press Ethics: Digital Thinking

M, 3-6:15pm

Jay Rosen

Press Ethics: Digital Thinking

Instructor: Jay Rosen

Course ID: JOUR-GA 0012.003

Days: M, 3-6:15pm

Room: 657

In this course we will examine what makes journalism different now that it runs on a digital platform. Readings and discussion will focus on making sense of the large shifts that accompany the move to digital production and distribution in professional journalism, including the "always on" web, the lower barriers to entry, the rise of social media and "the people formerly known as the audience," the ease of production using digital tools, the "unbundling" of news packages that were well adapted to prior platforms, the loss of monopoly status among news organizations, and the re-voicing of journalism in a more interactive environment for news. By comparing press ethics under the "old" system and the new codes that have emerged in the digital era, students will be able to hone in on what is different for professional journalists today, which is knowledge they will need for the remainder of the Studio 20 program.

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Studio 3

T, 2-6pm

Jay Rosen

Studio 3

Instructor: Jay Rosen

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.013

Days: T, 2-6pm

Room: 653

See instructor for details.

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» Graduate Electives

Directed Reading

TBA

TBA

Directed Reading

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1299.001

Days: TBA

Room: TBA

To enroll in Directed Readings, an interested student must find a full-time faculty member to be a sponsor and then must develop and file a syllabus. The syllabus must be approved by the faculty member and the Journalism Director of Graduate Studies. It must list, in week by week fashion, all readings and all writing assignments that the student will undertake for the Directed Readings. Once approved, this syllabus constitutes your "contract" on the project and the student's work will be judged and graded with that in mind.

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Investigative Reporting

R, 6:20-10pm

Mike McIntire

Investigative Reporting

Instructor: Mike McIntire

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.006

Days: R, 6:20-10pm

Room: 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

Your objective will be to master basic investigative tools and techniques, as well as how to apply them to everyday reporting and major enterprise pieces. We will explore how to take advantage of the two main sources of information documents and people and discuss when and how to use computer data to both enhance a story or provide the foundation for a major project. Throughout the course, the goal will be to constantly delve beneath the surface. Going deep is the essence of investigative reporting, which pulls together all publicly available information, as well as harder-to-find material, to present the fullest possible picture. Corporations and powerful individuals employ armies of PR experts, lawyers and lobbyists to ensure that only their version of reality prevails, and it is the lonely duty of journalists to dispel this fog of self-interest. At least as important as mastering the technical skills will be learning to think critically and skeptically. The relentlessly upbeat press release, the carefully worded SEC filing or the late-Friday-afternoon earnings statement each, as a matter of course, should be probed for accuracy and omission. What important development went unsaid? Did the company chairman really resign to "spend more time with his family"?

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Audience Members as Participants

W, 12:30-3:30pm

Clay Shirky

Audience Members as Participants

Instructor: Clay Shirky

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.014

Days: W, 12:30-3:30pm

Room: 657

From Like buttons through user comments to citizen journalism, the people formerly known as the audience are increasingly active participants in the new news ecosystem. This class will examine the ways existing news outlets are making and shaping opportunities for user participation. Students will be expected to participate in various news sites offerings and document the results, and to design and develop their own ideas for user participation."

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American Politics: The 2012 Election

W, 11:00-2:40pm

TBA

American Politics: The 2012 Election

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.002

Days: W, 11:00-2:40pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

This class will cover the  2012 Presidential and senatorial and congressional elections. We will write hard news and soft, read the best political writings over the decades, talk to some of the best political journalists, watch the best political films (of which there are many), and more. We will get out of the newsroom, talk to candidates, political operatives, and voters, and will end the semester with a long Q&A assignment with a top political journalists or political observer and a 3,000-word magazine style piece on an aspect of the elections, both upon the approval of your professor,who believes, that education need not be onerous and, in the words of the great reporter, writer and editor H.L. Mencken, that journalism "really is the "sport of kings." 

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Reporting the Arts: The Pop Culture Beat

W, 6:30pm-10:10pm

Jeff Giles

Reporting the Arts: The Pop Culture Beat

Instructor: Jeff Giles

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1231.003

Days: W, 6:30pm-10:10pm

Room: 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prof. Jeff Giles


This course will teach you how to write and report about the arts critically, passionately, and distinctively at a time when there are more platforms than ever available to journalists, but fame is a debased commodity and much of our culture is punch-drunk with its own silliness. We'll dissect great arts journalism old and new, long and short, in print and online. And we’ll also study bad articles that people were paid thousands of dollars to write to see what they reveal about how difficult it is to get access to a subject, how important it is have an angle you believe in, and how vital it is to develop your voice as a writer. We’ll discuss how to pitch stories, how to negotiate with publicists, how to work with editors, and how to build a career. Guest speakers will include prominent writers and editors, as well as publicists and executives who can give us a sense of what entertainment writers look like from the other side of the fence. Assignments will include a review, a Q+A, a handful of blog posts, and, as a final project, a 3,000-word feature story.

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The Editor's Vision

M, 5:30-9:10pm

Michael Solomon

The Editor's Vision

Instructor: Michael Solomon

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1019.001

Days: M, 5:30-9:10pm

Room: 653

The class will examine how editors imprint their own sensibility on a magazine, woo an audience and develop a unique identity for their publication. Coming up with the right mix of articles is a constant challenge; editors are always trying to re-invent the formula as well as struggling to find interesting ways to package service pieces or celebrity profiles, or come up with catchy covers and headlines to boost newsstand circulation.

New magazines evolve either from one person's passionate idea (Esquire and its founder Arnold Gingrich, Tina Brown and the Daily Beast) or are launched by corporate magazine development departments (Oprah, Real Simple, Lucky). This class will examine the history and evolution of magazines, from the hits and misses (Portfolio, Domino) of recent years to a look back at the past. Weekly classes will focus on different aspects of magazine-making, and leading editors, art directors and photo editors will visit as guest speakers to provide their expert insights.

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The Longform Essay

M, 9:30am-1:10pm

Katie Roiphe

The Longform Essay

Instructor: Katie Roiphe

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.011

Days: M, 9:30am-1:10pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

This is an advanced writing course with a rigorous focus on the mechanics of the essay. How does a great essay work? We will examine the elusive elements of precision, originality, and style. Over the course of the semester students will focus on developing and refining their own voice. Writers under discussion will include: Edmund Wilson, Vladimir Nabokov, Kenneth Tynan, Elizabeth Hardwick, Randall Jarrell, Virginia Woolf, Janet Malcolm, David Foster Wallace and James Wood.

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Profiles

T, 6-9:40pm

TBA

Profiles

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1231.002

Days: T, 6-9:40pm

Room: 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

What makes a magazine profile grab you from the start and keep you reading for 500 words—or 5,000? How do you get subjects to give you the access you need to show them as they really are? What are the various approaches to crafting a narrative and telling a story that makes the subject come alive? How do you choose which truth to tell—there are always many—about the person you're profiling? The goal of this course is to learn the basic rules of profile writing, from pre- and post-reporting around the subject to creating a level of trust with him or her to formulating a writing plan of action to crafting the final tale. By semester's end you will have written several profiles of different approaches and lengths, from a 500-word person-in-the-news story to a Q&As to a full-fledged richly-textured portrait. We will read and analyze current and classic profiles. focusing especially on the use of scenes, quotes, background information and authorial interjects. Classes will include guest speakers from the print or digital magazine space—editors and writers in sports, music, business, film, politics, culture and TV journalism—who will share stories, lessons and, perhaps, connections and advice for your own forays into professional profile writing.

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Writing the Long Form Narrative

R, 1:30-5:10pm

Adam L. Penenberg

Writing the Long Form Narrative

Instructor: Adam L. Penenberg

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.003

Days: R, 1:30-5:10pm

Room: 7th Floor Library

» Syllabus (PDF)

This seminar focuses on the various components that comprise in-depth magazine stories and non-fiction books. We'll dissect great modern and classic magazine stories, books and book proposals for story, character arcs, dialogue, scenes, analysis, structure, transitions, verb tense, point of view and style. The goal is to figure out how memorable magazine features and narrative non-fiction books that keep your attention to the very last page are created, then to take what we've learned and apply it to our own work. There is one semester-long writing assignment—a 3,000+-word feature story—with several shorter related pieces involving scenes, character, dialogue, or analysis, all of which can be incorporated into your final story. Along the way we'll work on pitches, research and interview techniques, time management, outlines, editing and multiple drafts, and other challenges today's non-fiction narrative writers face.

[x] close.

Storytellers

R, 1:30pm-5:10PM

David Samuels

Storytellers

Instructor: David Samuels

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1231.001

Days: R, 1:30pm-5:10PM

Room: Off Site - See Albert

» Syllabus (PDF)

Great stories are shaped by talented, reckless, funny, arrogant and often misanthropic writers and reporters working at the height of their craft. In this class, we will study how world-shaking historical events and everyday experiences alike can be crafted into original journalistic narratives. We will concentrate on the writer’s angle of approach to the subject – his or her “voice” – which is made more or less convincing through his or her control over language and the depth and range of his/her reporting. The first half of each class will consist of close readings of nonfiction narratives on Balkan wars, acid trips, nervous breakdowns, rock and roll concerts, a sarin gas attack in the Tokyo subways, a visit to the Iowa State Fair and assorted other subjects by some of my favorite journalists and novelists including Tom Wolfe, Joan Didion, David Foster Wallace, Denis Johnson, Rebecca West, Ryszard Kapucinski, Haruki Murakami, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Joseph Mitchell. Each class will begin promptly at 12:30 PM and will be divided between an hour and thirty minute discussion of the assigned reading and an hour and fifteen minute discussion of your written work. Latecomers will be greeted with derision. We will break at 2 PM for afternoon snack. We will also enjoy visits from enlivening and informative guests from Harper’s, The New Yorker and other high-class venues, who can answer any questions you might have about reporting and editing, and who will help you shape your ideas with an eye towards publishing your own work.

Literary Reportage and Magazine priority.

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The "R" Word

R 6:30pm-9:40pm

TBA

The "R" Word

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1019.002

Days: R 6:30pm-9:40pm

Room: 7th Floor Library

» Syllabus (PDF)

Religion informs a wide array of stories, everything from U.S. military involvement in the Middle East, reporting on access to contraception, the route of an urban bike path, who best to thank for a touchdown, and the conflicting demands of observance and spirituality.

That diversity (and diffusion) of subject means that religion stories can be inspired and crafted in practically every form—narrative, profile, personal essay, straight news, criticism—and on practically every topic, even those that don’t immediately announce themselves as religious.

It also implies that determining what qualifies as a religious story is no easy matter. This class will investigate the ways in which writing and reporting confronts and encompasses religious belief and belief systems. It will also focus on the practical aspects of generating works in a topic that is broad enough to interest(and, when merited, offend) just about everyone.

[x] close.