Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute at New York University

Course Listings | Spring 2014

Course information subject to change. Please check back frequently for updates. All courses are at 20 Cooper Square unless otherwise noted. To view a course description and syllabus, click on each course’s Title. Electives are the last tab and are available to all students.

» Undergraduate Journalism

Methods and Practice: Point of View

Fri 12:20pm4:00pm

James McBride

Methods and Practice: Point of View

Instructor: James McBride

Course ID: JOUR-UA 202, section 001

Days: Fri 12:20pm4:00pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square,7th Floor Library (rm. 700)

» Syllabus (PDF)

Be ready to write longhand. No computers. No cell phones in class. Pencil and
yellow legal sized paper only. Please be on time. Bring a jacket and a metro card.
For the first class, there is absolute silence when you enter the room. No
talking. Not even to say hello to your neighbor. You want to hear a hello? Here it
is: Hello. Now, no talking for the first ten minutes of class. It sounds stupid, but it
is our first exercise.

Good writing is all about finding the right detail or set of details that will show, not
tell, the event to the listener. You are always fighting gravity, always fighting the reader
who will close the paper, book, magazine and tune you out. We will focus on placing you
in the right mental place to find the details that will tell the story, from your perspective, in
a way that is honest to your truth and hold the reader.

There will be some reading aloud in class. There will be no bloodlettings. If
you’re willing to fail, you will be successful. If you’re already a journalistic success, this
isn’t the class for you. Remember, writing is the act of continually failing at excellence,
and uniformity is the ceiling against which great writing will forever bump. The mid term
and final will be your writing.

Before each class, you will be expected to read the following excerpts from “A
Nietzsche Reader” (Penguin) translated by R. J. Hollingdale. They are not long, but they
are important. We may alter this list based on my assessment of your abilities . Reading
assignments in Gary Smith and Micheal Herr’s books, as well as our Marvel Comic
class, will be assigned as we go deeper into the semester and I am able to assess your
abilities.

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Methods and Practice: The Personal Essay

Tues 4:55pm-7:35pm

David Dent

Methods and Practice: The Personal Essay

Instructor: David Dent

Course ID: JOUR-UA 202.002

Days: Tues 4:55pm-7:35pm

Room: 20 Cooper, room 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

In this course students will examine race, class, gender. generational politics, urban life and income equality largely through the prism of personal essays. Students will read personal essays that explore those subjects by several writers including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, WEB Dubois, Joyce Carol Oats, Zadie Smith, David Foster Wallace and others. Students will work on developing their own voices as essayists through several writing assignments

 

 

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Methods and Practice: Visual Reporting

W 5:00pm - 8:40pm

David Handschuh

Methods and Practice: Visual Reporting

Instructor: David Handschuh

Course ID: JOUR-UA 203.001

Days: W 5:00pm - 8:40pm

Room: 20 Cooper, room 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

Learn to use a digital SLR camera. Practice the skills and techniques professionals use to produce story-telling images. Learn to capture fleeting moments, document daily life, and special events. By semester’s end, you should have a basic understanding of the history of photojournalism and the impact photographs have on society, legal and ethical concerns of photojournalists, digital production of photographs, and the importance of captions and text accompanying those photos. You should also have a variety of photojournalistic images suitable for an entry-level portfolio. Many of your images should be suitable for publication.

Develop your own story ideas, cover city and campus events. Edit and scan your own photographs using Adobe Photoshop or any similar image processing program.  Share your photos with classmates; critique your own work and theirs in a group setting.

This is NOT a darkroom or basic photography class, but some portion of the class will be focused on teaching basic skills. The emphasis is on taking and editing pictures. A basic understanding of camera operation and exposure is required and recommended.

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CrisisBeat: Reporting on Religion, Ethnicity and Human Rights

Fri 2:00pm- 5:40pm

Jason Maloney

CrisisBeat: Reporting on Religion, Ethnicity and Human Rights

Instructor: Jason Maloney

Course ID: JOUR-UA 204.001 Elective Reporting Topics

Days: Fri 2:00pm- 5:40pm

Room: 20 Cooper, room 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOUR-UA 204.001 Elective Reporting Topics:CrisisBeat - Reporting on Religion, Ethnicity and Human Rights

A blend of regionally-focused and thematic study, intense analysis of foreign news coverage, and actual production and reporting effort, CrisisBeat is a course designed for students interested in internationally-focused video or print journalism. The class will offer a rare opportunity for hands-on experience supporting the production of a television news series on the intersection of international politics and global religion for a major national media outlet. In 2012-2013, Professor Jason Maloney's non-profit production unit, the Bureau for International Reporting, has contracted with PBS NewsHour to produce a six-part series called Fault Lines of Faith. This course will work towards identifying, researching and developing topics that are of global importance and appropriate for television news production and inclusion in this series. The class will also develop a companion blog for the series, which will feature some of the student work done for the class. The class will also be responsible for reporting and producing video interviews with experts on International Affairs.

 

To achieve our class goals, students will divide up the world into regional dossiers, study local dynamics and socio-political trends and develop individual stories from within their areas of focus. In class, students will present and brief the group on their region, and on developments that impact our major theme. This will involve aggregating news content from a series of media, international and regional, but will also involve primary source reporting using Skype, phone and email and through coverage of public meetings and events focused on their topic and hosted by relevant organizations in New York (Human Rights Watch, Asia Society, UN groups). We will also occasionally bring these experts to us... and hear from occasional guest speakers who are expert in the topics and regions we are covering.

 

Some of the efforts undertaken by students as part of this class will support the production of the stories that are covered as part of the NewsHour video series; other work will lead to content that will be disseminated through our Fault Lines of Faith Blog. This course will offer those students interested in TV or video news production an opportunity to be a part of a major news project that will result in significant airtime on a nationally-broadcast, well-respected outlet. For those students not primarily interested in video, this course still offers the opportunity for first-hand reporting on global and topical subject matter with the potential for clips running on a promoted website. The essential skills for story identification, development, research and writing, with an emphasis on storytelling, are universal to all dissemination platforms. Though our primary outlet for this project is television, the class will emphasize story and reporting.

 

 

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Production & Publication: TV Newscast

T 1:00pm-7:00pm

Nancy Han

Production & Publication: TV Newscast

Instructor: Nancy Han

Course ID: JOUR-UA 302.001

Days: T 1:00pm-7:00pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, TV Studio (room 761)

» Syllabus (PDF)

Students in this class will be involved in every aspect of producing a television newscast. The weekly shows will be broadcast live on the NYU cable system and streamed online. Each student will take on a different role, from anchoring, line producing, directing, to running audio, prompter or EP’ing.  There will be strong emphasis on script writing, story selection and placement, as well as execution in the control room. The class assignments include both editorial and operational functions. Our class will act as a living newsroom where there is a tight deadline to get the show on the air. There will also be reporting assignments outside of the Tuesday class. “NYU Tonight” airs at 6pm every Tuesday for 30 minutes.  We will reconvene as a group from 630 to 7p for post-game discussion.

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Journalism Seminar: The Journalism of Empathy

T 11:00am - 1:30pm

Ted Conover

Journalism Seminar: The Journalism of Empathy

Instructor: Ted Conover

Course ID: JOUR-UA 401.001

Days: T 11:00am - 1:30pm

Room: 20 Cooper, 7th floor library (rm. 700)

» Syllabus (PDF)

Empathy in narrative has roots in some of the earliest written stories—what is a literary character, after all, if not an imagining of the the world through someone else’s eyes? But empathy is not exclusively the tool of novelists and playwrights. In our time, journalists such as Alex Kotlowitz, Adrian Nicole LeBlanc, Anne Fadiman, Jon Krakauer, Susan Orlean, Sebastian Junger, and Katherine Boo (and earlier, John Hersey and others) have used a fiercely empathetic approach to create powerful nonfiction narratives, sometimes with social justice concerns. This course will survey the history and recent practice of empathetic nonfiction, using seminal readings as models for your own writing and reporting. In other words, it's a reading course and an article-writing course: Assignments will require original reporting and offer a chance to experiment with elements of narrative writing such as setting scenes, developing character, dialog, conflict, and, when appropriate, the first person voice.

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Journalism & Society: Women and the Media

Tues 12:00pm2:30pm

Carol Sternhell

Journalism & Society: Women and the Media

Instructor: Carol Sternhell

Course ID: JOUR-UA 503.001

Days: Tues 12:00pm2:30pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

Women & the Media is a collaborative seminar designed to examine the complex relationship
(or different, contradictory relationships) between those humans we call “women” and those
forms of discourse we call “media.” We will consider women both as subjects and objects, as
artists and models, as creators of “media” in its many forms and as media’s creations. What
does our culture’s “media” tell us about its ideas of gender? What, if anything, does our gender
tell us about our readings of “media”? Student participation in this seminar is key: students are
expected to attend all sessions, to complete all the reading (there's lots of reading!), to
participate actively in discussion, and to lead one of the class sessions themselves. Leading a
class means opening the day’s conversation with a presentation, critiquing and elaborating on
the assigned reading, bringing in additional relevant material, and suggesting questions or
issues that seem particularly interesting or troublesome. The purpose of the course is to
develop our critical and self-critical faculties as journalists, media critics, consumers of media,
and women or men—to think clearly, challenge our pet assumptions, and have fun.
Along with attendance and informed class participation, students are required to conduct a miniresearch
project and present their findings to the class. I want you to pick a “women and media”
topic that really interests you and then report the hell out of it. If you’re interested in the effect of
music videos on teenage girls, for instance, you would first put together an extensive
bibliography of what has already been written on the subject. You would figure out what the key
questions in the field were: do media images affect teens’ behavior or not, and how can anyone
tell? You might interview some of the leading researchers in the area and tell us what they say.
You’ll certainly want to read the most important books/articles on your subject. A paper is not
required; instead, students will present their findings to the class during our last three sessions.

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Journalism as Literature: Learning from the Best to be the Best

Tues 2:00pm-4:30pm

Michael Solomon

Journalism as Literature: Learning from the Best to be the Best

Instructor: Michael Solomon

Course ID: JOUR-UA 504.001

Days: Tues 2:00pm-4:30pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

Learning from The Best To Be The Best is a survey of some of the most entertaining and well-written literary journalism of the last two centuries. We will read these articles and book excerpts carefully - "deep reading," it is called - to discover how good writers take basic journalism and enliven it with literary technique. We want to catalog as much of that technique and structure as we can so that we can "steal it," appropriate the devices for our own work. Students will work in teams; each week a team will "present" the readings and incite a discussion with the rest of the class. There will be some three to five formal academic papers in which students will be asked to demonstrate their understanding of the material, and there will be a number of "creative" assignments as well. The main text for the course is an excellent anthology of non-fiction: The Art of Fact by Kerrane and Yagoda..

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Issues and Ideas: Covering Sub-Saharan Africa

Mon 3:30pm-6:00pm

Frankie Edozien

Issues and Ideas: Covering Sub-Saharan Africa

Instructor: Frankie Edozien

Course ID: JOUR-UA 505.001

Days: Mon 3:30pm-6:00pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

Challenges, Issues and Ideas in Covering Sub-Saharan Africa

Africa covers a vast area of 55 countries and 1.1 billion inhabitants. There are countries that are emerging economic powers and heading towards industrialization. In other cases, some countries are taking the lead in developing technology hubs, and testing out new forms of mobile banking and virtual money. Other countries wield considerable “soft power” via their film, music and contemporary culture and they are driving the way Africans present themselves to the world.

Comprehensive coverage of Africa is scant. The sparse coverage is often a variation of an incomplete portrait that has dominated the Western media for the last 50 years: tales of starvation, political instability and disease are mainstays. There is often little or no historical or political context in most of this coverage.

This course will provide students with an understanding of contemporary issues around the various regions on the African continent. We will examine the role of religion, including religious extremism that has led to the near- splintering of several societies; the struggles to develop viable democratic models; cultural norms and practices; and issues of economic development and empowerment. We will focus on the challenges of telling stories from Sub-Saharan Africa that are not the same old stories, with the same tired clichés.

We will accomplish this by reading works that combine history, political analysis and narrative journalism. This historical and political background will help students to eventually write about the region with depth and nuance, and to evaluate the coverage that they read. In addition, we will analyze the evolution and implications of the myriad of U.S. foreign policy actions on the African continent.

Today, Africa is poised for an era of political and cultural renewal. The continent’s population is expected to double by 2050 and its influence on the world stage is growing.

We will discuss the challenges of reporting from regions with competing narratives, authoritarian regimes that have little respect for a free press, and places where journalists must work under constant danger. We also will strive to on occasion have guest speakers who have worked as foreign correspondents or editors managing coverage of Africa. By the end of this course, you will hopefully be a more informed reader and analyst of events in the continent.

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Issues and Ideas: Re-Visioning Sexual Politics

Wed 12:00pm-2:30pm

Carol Sternhell

Issues and Ideas: Re-Visioning Sexual Politics

Instructor: Carol Sternhell

Course ID: JOUR-UA 505.001

Days: Wed 12:00pm-2:30pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

JOUR-UA 505 Issues & Ideas: Re-Visioning Sexual Politics

This course will explore current controversies in sexual politics from the arguments about "having it all" to pronouncements of "the end of men" to the tensions between older feminists and newer transgender activists over who gets to qualify as a "woman."  This is primarily a seminar--meaning lots of reading and discussion--but students will also be expected to do their own writing and reporting on these issues in a variety of formats, including long-form journalism and personal essays.  These debates are both important and complicated:  the purpose of the class isn't to decree one position wrong.  For instance, right this moment--as the course is being planned--a controversy has erupted online about rape on college campuses (not an argument between rape apologists and feminists--in that case, one side is wrong--but an argument among feminists).  If we warn college women about the association between rape and excessive drinking, suggesting that they drink less--as one writer does--is that an example of blaming the victim?  Is a title like Sisterhood, Interrupted: From Radical Women to Grrls Gone Wild--some of which we'll read--a prudish misinterpretation of young women's sexual freedom, a case of "slut-shaming," or have young women given up their freedom to the beauty myth?  If a group of women create "woman-only" space, is a transwoman welcome?  Readings in this class will include journalism, scholarship, and polemic, both contemporary and historical, that explores or illuminates our current clashes of the personal and the political.

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Internship

TBA

Sylvan Solloway

Internship

Instructor: Sylvan Solloway

Course ID: JOUR-UA 0980

Days: TBA

Room: 20 Cooper

DECLARED JOURNALISM MAJORS ONLY Hours Arranged

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry, The Beat

To enroll:
1) Students must be declared journalism majors who have been offered an internship. The Career Services director must approve the internship. All sophomores must consult the director before applying for a credit internship.
2) No credit will be given for internships in advertising, marketing, public relations or the fashion/accessory closet.
3) Students may take the course for 1, 2, 3 or 4 credits but can earn no more than 4 credits total while attending the institute. Only one internship for credit is allowed per semester.

 

For moew information go to the Career Services section.

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Advanced Individualized Study

TBA

TBA

Advanced Individualized Study

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 997

Days: TBA

Room: TBA

To enroll in Advanced Individualized Study, an interested student must find a full-time faculty member to be a sponsor and then must develop and file a syllabus. The syllabus must be approved by the faculty member and the Journalism Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUS). It must list, in week by week fashion, all readings and all writing assignments that the student will undertake for the Advanced Individualized Study. Once approved, this syllabus constitutes your "contract" on the project and the student's work will be judged and graded with that in mind.

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Investigating Journalism (lecture)

Friday 12:30-3:00pm

Mitchell Stephens

Investigating Journalism (lecture)

Instructor: Mitchell Stephens

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 001

Days: Friday 12:30-3:00pm

Room: Silver 414

» Syllabus (PDF)

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

JOUR-UA 501Investigating Journalism
(formerly  JOUR-UA 501 Foundations of Journalism)

This lecture course will introduce you to issues in journalistic writing and reporting, such as the choices journalists face in method, style, and form; the political impact of the news media; questions of sensationalism, bias, and diversity, and the current digital upheaval. To better understand what journalism has been and might be, students are also introduced to a selection of the best journalism, from Edward R. Murrow on migrant farm workers to Adrian Nicole LeBlanc on family life around the drug trade in the Bronx.
Your work will be reading the assigned pieces, coming to class ready to comment on and question them, preparing for some tests and producing a paper of two during the semester. (Unlike most of the courses in the Carter Institute and the Journalism major, this is not a reporting and writing course, though reporting and writing will often be discussed. )

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Journalism Ethics and First Amendment Law

M 6:20pm-8:50pm

George Freeman

Journalism Ethics and First Amendment Law

Instructor: George Freeman

Course ID: JOUR-UA 502.001

Days: M 6:20pm-8:50pm

Room: Silver 208

» Syllabus (PDF)

SPRING SEMESTERS ONLY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This course is designed to acquaint students with the basic protections and restrictions of the law as they apply to the media, as well as the ethical problems and dilemmas journalists face. First Amendment rights and legal and ethical responsibilities and limitations will be examined and discussed. The course will look at these questions from five viewpoints: from (i) the practical view of a journalist doing his job with (ii) heavy consideration of ethical imperatives, and (iii) from a legal prospective, all the while (iv) considering the rules in a public policy context- are they fair and appropriate in our society? -- while (v) noting the historical context in which they arise. Significant court cases and fundamental legal rules as well as past ethical scandals and issues will be explored in the context of political and historical realities, and in terms of journalistic standards and practices; contemporary media law issues and ethical problems and guidelines will also be focused on. Among the basic First Amendment issues which will be examined are libel, invasion of privacy, prior restraints, newsgathering and newsgathering torts, and the reporter's privilege; some of the ethical issues to be explored include objectivity in reporting, bias and transparency, conflicts of interest, and fair dealings with subjects, sources and advertisers.


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Journalism Ethics and First Amendment Law

W 6:20pm-8:50pm

David A. Kaplan

Journalism Ethics and First Amendment Law

Instructor: David A. Kaplan

Course ID: JOUR-UA 502.002

Days: W 6:20pm-8:50pm

Room: Silver 208

» Syllabus (PDF)

SPRING SEMESTERS ONLY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This course is designed to acquaint students with the basic protections and restrictions of the law as they apply to the media, as well as the ethical problems and dilemmas journalists face. First Amendment rights and legal and ethical responsibilities and limitations will be examined and discussed. The course will look at these questions from five viewpoints: from (i) the practical view of a journalist doing his job with (ii) heavy consideration of ethical imperatives, and (iii) from a legal prospective, all the while (iv) considering the rules in a public policy context- are they fair and appropriate in our society? -- while (v) noting the historical context in which they arise. Significant court cases and fundamental legal rules as well as past ethical scandals and issues will be explored in the context of political and historical realities, and in terms of journalistic standards and practices; contemporary media law issues and ethical problems and guidelines will also be focused on. Among the basic First Amendment issues which will be examined are libel, invasion of privacy, prior restraints, newsgathering and newsgathering torts, and the reporter's privilege; some of the ethical issues to be explored include objectivity in reporting, bias and transparency, conflicts of interest, and fair dealings with subjects, sources and advertisers.


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Journalistic Inquiry

Mon/Wed 10:00am-11:50am

Lambeth Hochwald

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Lambeth Hochwald

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101.002

Days: Mon/Wed 10:00am-11:50am

Room: 20 Cooper, room 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: JOUR-UA 501 Investigating Journalism

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.


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Journalistic Inquiry

Tu/Th 6:20pm-8:10pm

Tatsha Robertson

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Tatsha Robertson

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101.003

Days: Tu/Th 6:20pm-8:10pm

Room: 20 Cooper, room 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: JOUR-UA 501 Investigating Journalism

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.


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Journalistic Inquiry

Mon/Wed 6:30pm-8:30pm

Kenneth Paulsen

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Kenneth Paulsen

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101.004

Days: Mon/Wed 6:30pm-8:30pm

Room: 20 Cooper, room 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: JOUR-UA 501 Investigating Journalism

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.


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Journalistic Inquiry

Tues/Thur 10:00am-11:50am

Keith Kloor

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Keith Kloor

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101.001

Days: Tues/Thur 10:00am-11:50am

Room: 20 Cooper, room 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: JOUR-UA 501 Investigating Journalism

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.

...

In this skills course, we will explore the world around us and look for stories beneath the surface. This section of Journalistic Inquiry is a fun, eye-opening journey to build a foundation for covering news and features with passion and creativity.

Bring a curious mind to this class as we cover news around the city. To get solid stories, let’s take the news and break it down. Analyze it and find experts and primary sources to bring our stories to life and give them a human dimension with telling quotes, anecdotes and thoughtful yet objective writing.

 

This will be a hands-on course aimed at making you confident multi-platform journalists, ready to take on assignments for print, TV and the Internet.  Along the way, you will meet and interview newsmakers and characters from the worlds of business, fashion, media and more in the classroom and field.

You will prepare for assignments and group interviews in advance. Stay on top of your email – I will act as an assignment manager, updating us on what’s planned for class and how to get ready.

As we venture where the news takes us, you will get a taste for whether you like this profession and are well-suited for it. This class holds a mirror to a working world you will soon enter.

These days, most journalism jobs require you to be well-versed in all media. Consider this class a hearty buffet from which we will get a sampling of spot news and feature reporting for print, radio, TV and the Internet.

Today you are students and you are journalists.  Enjoy the ride.

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Journalistic Inquiry

Tues/Thur 11:00am-12:50am

Joe Lapointe

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Joe Lapointe

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101.006

Days: Tues/Thur 11:00am-12:50am

Room: 20 Cooper, room 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: JOUR-UA 501 Investigating Journalism

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.


[x] close.

Journalistic Inquiry

Tues/Thur 1:00pm-2:50pm

Fran Stern

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Fran Stern

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101.007

Days: Tues/Thur 1:00pm-2:50pm

Room: 20 Cooper, room 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: JOUR-UA 501 Investigating Journalism

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.


[x] close.

The Beat: TV NY Neighborhoods

Mon 12:30pm - 3:00pm

Jane Stone

The Beat: TV NY Neighborhoods

Instructor: Jane Stone

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201.003

Days: Mon 12:30pm - 3:00pm

Room: 20 Cooper, room 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Inquiry

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

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The Beat: Food Writing

Wed 11:00am-2:40pm

Betty Ming Liu

The Beat: Food Writing

Instructor: Betty Ming Liu

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201.001

Days: Wed 11:00am-2:40pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

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As food writers, we will harvest the exciting bounty of New York City, foodie capitol of the world. Our approach to this adventure is totally New York, which means savoring the Big Apple in all its glamorous and gritty glory. So expect to cover a wide range of food features -- from restaurant reviews and dining trends, to the politics and economics of how and what we eat. Guest speakers and field trips are on the menu, along with assignments designed to build confidence in your reporting/writing. The course's workshop setting also provides a supportive environment for exploring your personal writing style and developing your voice.

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The Beat: Reporting Downton

Tues 3:30pm-710pm

Frankie Edozien

The Beat: Reporting Downton

Instructor: Frankie Edozien

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201, Section 002

Days: Tues 3:30pm-710pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

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Whether you're based in Paris or Los Angeles, Beijing or Wyoming, covering a geographic beat is a unique experience because you need the confidence and skills to write about everything. For this class, our territory is the world situated south of 14th Street. Each of you will be based in a specific neighborhood, where you'll cover a wide range of stories. Whether you're reporting on crime or culture, politics or hot parties, you'll learn what it takes to parachute into a new locale and find your bearings. This class will unleash your inner adventurer by strengthening your interviewing/writing abilities while you're developing a reportorial voice. Guest speakers and field trips will be essential to our journey.

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The Beat: NY Characters

Th 2:30pm - 6:10pm

Vivien Orbach-Smith

The Beat: NY Characters

Instructor: Vivien Orbach-Smith

Course ID: JOUR-UA 201.004

Days: Th 2:30pm - 6:10pm

Room: 20 Cooper, room 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites:  Inquiry

This course is designed to hone the student journalist's ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test them with the strength of his or her reporting and resarch, and then to present them in story form. Students will be expected to keep weeky beat notes or blogs, exploring what is current in the topic and demonstrating week after week the shoeleather they have worn in pursuit of their subject matter. Out of this work will come four or five stories in narrative, explanatory or investigative style, depending on the instructor and the specific assignment. Syllabi differ by content of the course but all sections emphasize idea development, interview technique, reporting, background research and writing skills across genres. Broadcast sections vary only by medium.

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New York was commonly referred to as a “melting pot” throughout much of the previous
century, but with the surge in multiethnic and multicultural identities among its inhabitants, the
“stew-pot” or “tossed salad” has emerged as the current paradigm. In this intensive skills
course, you will learn how to report on one of the most fascinating aspects of New York: its
stunningly diverse people. You will be required to declare a beat and immerse yourself in a
subject area you are passionate about – New Yorkers in entertainment, in the arts, in politics, in
race relations, in religion, in sports, in education, in the fields of fashion/restaurants/
commerce/media and so on. These New Yorkers may be “ordinary folks” or luminaries,
individuals who are extremely successful in their fields or who are struggling to overcome
serious challenges, born-and-bred New Yorkers or part of the immigrant tapestry that lends
color and vibrancy to our city. You will be guided in coming up with and pursuing great, fresh
story ideas within your beat, in writing five pieces (four shorter ones and one more-in-depth
final), and in finding venues to submit them. The goal is learning how to craft strong, captivating
stories featuring memorable New York characters and settings - with emphasis upon
resourceful newsgathering and interviewing; responsible presentation of facts and events; vivid
character development, color and detail; coherent structure, impeccable mechanics, and artful
language. You will be encouraged to not only strengthen your reporting/writing skills, but to
broaden your perspective (and your fellow students’) about the varied cultural/socioeconomic
milieus of your subjects.


This class will provide you with opportunities to write stories that are genuinely publishable, on
subjects that genuinely interest you. You will be encouraged to write creatively and gorgeously,
and even to try to change the world…but your product must retain the clarity, concision and
precision that were drummed into you in Reporting I/II, stopping far short of “fan-like,” gushy
prose, blinding passions or fictional license

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Advanced Reporting: On the Road in the City

Tues 9:30-1:10pm

David Dent

Advanced Reporting: On the Road in the City

Instructor: David Dent

Course ID: JOUR-UA 301.003

Days: Tues 9:30-1:10pm

Room: 20 Cooper, 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: Foundations, The Beat

This is the Capstone course. Subject matter varies from section to section, but the basic skeleton of the course is the same across sections: the emphasis is on development of the ability to produce writing and reporting within a sophisticated longform story structure. The course involves query writing, topic research and reading, interviewing, and repeated drafts and rewrites, leading to a full-length piece of writing aimed at a publishable level and the ability of the student to present the reporting orally.

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In On The Road in the City, students will go on a series of journeys throughout the city in search of snippets of ordinary life that say something extraordinary about the city and humanity. In the process, students will be in pursuit of the seeds of cultural change. The mission and challenge will be to present those seeds and portraits of life with prose that gives the reader a sense of making the same discoveries. You will also read three books that employ "road" journalism in different ways. The semester will culminate in your own major project that will require you to journey with a social or cultural world of New York.

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Advanced Reporting - TV Magazine

Wed 12:00pm-3:40pm

Marcia Rock

Advanced Reporting - TV Magazine

Instructor: Marcia Rock

Course ID: JOUR-UA 301.006

Days: Wed 12:00pm-3:40pm

Room: 20 Cooper, room 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: The Beat

This is the Capstone course. Subject matter varies from section to section, but the basic skeleton of the course is the same across sections: the emphasis is on development of the ability to produce writing and reporting within a sophisticated longform story structure. The course involves query writing, topic research and reading, interviewing, and repeated drafts and rewrites, leading to a full-length piece of writing aimed at a publishable level and the ability of the student to present the reporting orally.

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Restricted to Broadcast Students Only

This class is designed to provide you with the necessary tools to research, shoot and edit your own long-form broadcast news segment. During the semester you will study the best of long-form broadcast journalism and set out to create your own. You will learn the challenges of producing quality broadcast journalism, which will include understanding media ethics and the importance of good writing. Each student will research and pitch their own original story idea and by the end of the semester will produce an approximately 10-minute long broadcast segment on their chosen topic. In addition time in class devoted to developing your final project, during the semester you will meet and learn from award-winning long-form broadcast news producers, who will come to class to screen and discuss their work.

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Advanced Reporting: Advanced TV Reporting

Mon 5:30pm-8:00pm

Jane Stone

Advanced Reporting: Advanced TV Reporting

Instructor: Jane Stone

Course ID: JOUR-UA 301.006

Days: Mon 5:30pm-8:00pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: The Beat

This is the Capstone course. Subject matter varies from section to section, but the basic skeleton of the course is the same across sections: the emphasis is on development of the ability to produce writing and reporting within a sophisticated longform story structure. The course involves query writing, topic research and reading, interviewing, and repeated drafts and rewrites, leading to a full-length piece of writing aimed at a publishable level and the ability of the student to present the reporting orally.

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In previous classes, students have learned the rudiments of story selection, writing and shooting.  This class advances those skills, with the added pressure of meeting real deadlines; i.e., producing pieces that air on a live, weekly news broadcast.  Stories will gradually grow in complexity over the semester.

Class one. Explanation of what the students will be expected to do during the semester, including how grades will be determined.  Discussion of types of stories to be done and  how they should be researched and presented to the professor for approval.  Students are instructed to bring in story ideas by the next session.  There will be attention to interviewing skills. All story ideas must be accompanied by a list of questions to be asked.

Students are required to do 4 stories of normal length and one more complicated, longer final piece.

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Honors Seminar: Broadcast, Multimedia & Print Convergence

W 10:00am - 1:00pm

Jason Samuels

Honors Seminar: Broadcast, Multimedia & Print Convergence

Instructor: Jason Samuels

Course ID: JOUR-UA 352.001

Days: W 10:00am - 1:00pm

Room: 20 Cooper, 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

SENIORS ONLY

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry, The Beat

Honors is a year-long research, writing and reporting course for seniors in which students choose and develop a senior thesis subject of their own choosing in the first semester and complete the project in the second. Students take Honors Advanced Reporting, followed by Honors Senior Seminar. Honors students must have a 3.65 average.

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Honors Seminar: Print Long Form Bias

Tues 3:30pm- 6:00pm

Brooke Kroeger

Honors Seminar: Print Long Form Bias

Instructor: Brooke Kroeger

Course ID: JOUR-UA 352.002

Days: Tues 3:30pm- 6:00pm

Room: 20 Cooper, 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

SENIORS ONLY

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry, The Beat

Honors is a year-long research, writing and reporting course for seniors in which students choose and develop a senior thesis subject of their own choosing in the first semester and complete the project in the second. Students take Honors Advanced Reporting, followed by Honors Senior Seminar. Honors students must have a 3.65 average.

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History of the Media

Thur 12:30-3:00pm

Mitchell Stephens

History of the Media

Instructor: Mitchell Stephens

Course ID: JOUR-UA 610.001

Days: Thur 12:30-3:00pm

Room: 20 Cooper, room 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

An attempt to better understand the communications revolution we are undergoing through an investigation of the nature and consequences of previous communications revolutions. Using readings ranging from Plato to Sontag to Kundera, the course will look closely at the history of spoken language, images, writing, printing, photography, radio and television. How were they understood? How were they initially used or misused? What were their effects upon social patterns, politics and thought? What can that tell us about the potential and potential influence of digital communication?

 

*Priority given to Media Criticism Students. A permission code is required to register, contact the department at 212-998-7994 or undergraduate.journalism@nyu.edu.

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» Undergraduate Media Criticism

Methods and Practice: The Personal Essay

Tues 4:55pm-7:35pm

David Dent

Methods and Practice: The Personal Essay

Instructor: David Dent

Course ID: JOUR-UA 202.002

Days: Tues 4:55pm-7:35pm

Room: 20 Cooper, room 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

In this course students will examine race, class, gender. generational politics, urban life and income equality largely through the prism of personal essays. Students will read personal essays that explore those subjects by several writers including James Baldwin, Joan Didion, WEB Dubois, Joyce Carol Oats, Zadie Smith, David Foster Wallace and others. Students will work on developing their own voices as essayists through several writing assignments

 

 

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CrisisBeat: Reporting on Religion, Ethnicity and Human Rights

Fri 2:00pm- 5:40pm

Jason Maloney

CrisisBeat: Reporting on Religion, Ethnicity and Human Rights

Instructor: Jason Maloney

Course ID: JOUR-UA 204.001 Elective Reporting Topics

Days: Fri 2:00pm- 5:40pm

Room: 20 Cooper, room 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOUR-UA 204.001 Elective Reporting Topics:CrisisBeat - Reporting on Religion, Ethnicity and Human Rights

A blend of regionally-focused and thematic study, intense analysis of foreign news coverage, and actual production and reporting effort, CrisisBeat is a course designed for students interested in internationally-focused video or print journalism. The class will offer a rare opportunity for hands-on experience supporting the production of a television news series on the intersection of international politics and global religion for a major national media outlet. In 2012-2013, Professor Jason Maloney's non-profit production unit, the Bureau for International Reporting, has contracted with PBS NewsHour to produce a six-part series called Fault Lines of Faith. This course will work towards identifying, researching and developing topics that are of global importance and appropriate for television news production and inclusion in this series. The class will also develop a companion blog for the series, which will feature some of the student work done for the class. The class will also be responsible for reporting and producing video interviews with experts on International Affairs.

 

To achieve our class goals, students will divide up the world into regional dossiers, study local dynamics and socio-political trends and develop individual stories from within their areas of focus. In class, students will present and brief the group on their region, and on developments that impact our major theme. This will involve aggregating news content from a series of media, international and regional, but will also involve primary source reporting using Skype, phone and email and through coverage of public meetings and events focused on their topic and hosted by relevant organizations in New York (Human Rights Watch, Asia Society, UN groups). We will also occasionally bring these experts to us... and hear from occasional guest speakers who are expert in the topics and regions we are covering.

 

Some of the efforts undertaken by students as part of this class will support the production of the stories that are covered as part of the NewsHour video series; other work will lead to content that will be disseminated through our Fault Lines of Faith Blog. This course will offer those students interested in TV or video news production an opportunity to be a part of a major news project that will result in significant airtime on a nationally-broadcast, well-respected outlet. For those students not primarily interested in video, this course still offers the opportunity for first-hand reporting on global and topical subject matter with the potential for clips running on a promoted website. The essential skills for story identification, development, research and writing, with an emphasis on storytelling, are universal to all dissemination platforms. Though our primary outlet for this project is television, the class will emphasize story and reporting.

 

 

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Journalism Seminar: The Journalism of Empathy

T 11:00am - 1:30pm

Ted Conover

Journalism Seminar: The Journalism of Empathy

Instructor: Ted Conover

Course ID: JOUR-UA 401.001

Days: T 11:00am - 1:30pm

Room: 20 Cooper, 7th floor library (rm. 700)

» Syllabus (PDF)

Empathy in narrative has roots in some of the earliest written stories—what is a literary character, after all, if not an imagining of the the world through someone else’s eyes? But empathy is not exclusively the tool of novelists and playwrights. In our time, journalists such as Alex Kotlowitz, Adrian Nicole LeBlanc, Anne Fadiman, Jon Krakauer, Susan Orlean, Sebastian Junger, and Katherine Boo (and earlier, John Hersey and others) have used a fiercely empathetic approach to create powerful nonfiction narratives, sometimes with social justice concerns. This course will survey the history and recent practice of empathetic nonfiction, using seminal readings as models for your own writing and reporting. In other words, it's a reading course and an article-writing course: Assignments will require original reporting and offer a chance to experiment with elements of narrative writing such as setting scenes, developing character, dialog, conflict, and, when appropriate, the first person voice.

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Journalism & Society: Women and the Media

Tues 12:00pm2:30pm

Carol Sternhell

Journalism & Society: Women and the Media

Instructor: Carol Sternhell

Course ID: JOUR-UA 503.001

Days: Tues 12:00pm2:30pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

Women & the Media is a collaborative seminar designed to examine the complex relationship
(or different, contradictory relationships) between those humans we call “women” and those
forms of discourse we call “media.” We will consider women both as subjects and objects, as
artists and models, as creators of “media” in its many forms and as media’s creations. What
does our culture’s “media” tell us about its ideas of gender? What, if anything, does our gender
tell us about our readings of “media”? Student participation in this seminar is key: students are
expected to attend all sessions, to complete all the reading (there's lots of reading!), to
participate actively in discussion, and to lead one of the class sessions themselves. Leading a
class means opening the day’s conversation with a presentation, critiquing and elaborating on
the assigned reading, bringing in additional relevant material, and suggesting questions or
issues that seem particularly interesting or troublesome. The purpose of the course is to
develop our critical and self-critical faculties as journalists, media critics, consumers of media,
and women or men—to think clearly, challenge our pet assumptions, and have fun.
Along with attendance and informed class participation, students are required to conduct a miniresearch
project and present their findings to the class. I want you to pick a “women and media”
topic that really interests you and then report the hell out of it. If you’re interested in the effect of
music videos on teenage girls, for instance, you would first put together an extensive
bibliography of what has already been written on the subject. You would figure out what the key
questions in the field were: do media images affect teens’ behavior or not, and how can anyone
tell? You might interview some of the leading researchers in the area and tell us what they say.
You’ll certainly want to read the most important books/articles on your subject. A paper is not
required; instead, students will present their findings to the class during our last three sessions.

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Journalism as Literature: Learning from the Best to be the Best

Tues 2:00pm-4:30pm

Michael Solomon

Journalism as Literature: Learning from the Best to be the Best

Instructor: Michael Solomon

Course ID: JOUR-UA 504.001

Days: Tues 2:00pm-4:30pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

Learning from The Best To Be The Best is a survey of some of the most entertaining and well-written literary journalism of the last two centuries. We will read these articles and book excerpts carefully - "deep reading," it is called - to discover how good writers take basic journalism and enliven it with literary technique. We want to catalog as much of that technique and structure as we can so that we can "steal it," appropriate the devices for our own work. Students will work in teams; each week a team will "present" the readings and incite a discussion with the rest of the class. There will be some three to five formal academic papers in which students will be asked to demonstrate their understanding of the material, and there will be a number of "creative" assignments as well. The main text for the course is an excellent anthology of non-fiction: The Art of Fact by Kerrane and Yagoda..

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Issues and Ideas: Covering Sub-Saharan Africa

Mon 3:30pm-6:00pm

Frankie Edozien

Issues and Ideas: Covering Sub-Saharan Africa

Instructor: Frankie Edozien

Course ID: JOUR-UA 505.001

Days: Mon 3:30pm-6:00pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

Challenges, Issues and Ideas in Covering Sub-Saharan Africa

Africa covers a vast area of 55 countries and 1.1 billion inhabitants. There are countries that are emerging economic powers and heading towards industrialization. In other cases, some countries are taking the lead in developing technology hubs, and testing out new forms of mobile banking and virtual money. Other countries wield considerable “soft power” via their film, music and contemporary culture and they are driving the way Africans present themselves to the world.

Comprehensive coverage of Africa is scant. The sparse coverage is often a variation of an incomplete portrait that has dominated the Western media for the last 50 years: tales of starvation, political instability and disease are mainstays. There is often little or no historical or political context in most of this coverage.

This course will provide students with an understanding of contemporary issues around the various regions on the African continent. We will examine the role of religion, including religious extremism that has led to the near- splintering of several societies; the struggles to develop viable democratic models; cultural norms and practices; and issues of economic development and empowerment. We will focus on the challenges of telling stories from Sub-Saharan Africa that are not the same old stories, with the same tired clichés.

We will accomplish this by reading works that combine history, political analysis and narrative journalism. This historical and political background will help students to eventually write about the region with depth and nuance, and to evaluate the coverage that they read. In addition, we will analyze the evolution and implications of the myriad of U.S. foreign policy actions on the African continent.

Today, Africa is poised for an era of political and cultural renewal. The continent’s population is expected to double by 2050 and its influence on the world stage is growing.

We will discuss the challenges of reporting from regions with competing narratives, authoritarian regimes that have little respect for a free press, and places where journalists must work under constant danger. We also will strive to on occasion have guest speakers who have worked as foreign correspondents or editors managing coverage of Africa. By the end of this course, you will hopefully be a more informed reader and analyst of events in the continent.

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Issues and Ideas: Re-Visioning Sexual Politics

Wed 12:00pm-2:30pm

Carol Sternhell

Issues and Ideas: Re-Visioning Sexual Politics

Instructor: Carol Sternhell

Course ID: JOUR-UA 505.001

Days: Wed 12:00pm-2:30pm

Room: 20 Cooper Square, room 654

JOUR-UA 505 Issues & Ideas: Re-Visioning Sexual Politics

This course will explore current controversies in sexual politics from the arguments about "having it all" to pronouncements of "the end of men" to the tensions between older feminists and newer transgender activists over who gets to qualify as a "woman."  This is primarily a seminar--meaning lots of reading and discussion--but students will also be expected to do their own writing and reporting on these issues in a variety of formats, including long-form journalism and personal essays.  These debates are both important and complicated:  the purpose of the class isn't to decree one position wrong.  For instance, right this moment--as the course is being planned--a controversy has erupted online about rape on college campuses (not an argument between rape apologists and feminists--in that case, one side is wrong--but an argument among feminists).  If we warn college women about the association between rape and excessive drinking, suggesting that they drink less--as one writer does--is that an example of blaming the victim?  Is a title like Sisterhood, Interrupted: From Radical Women to Grrls Gone Wild--some of which we'll read--a prudish misinterpretation of young women's sexual freedom, a case of "slut-shaming," or have young women given up their freedom to the beauty myth?  If a group of women create "woman-only" space, is a transwoman welcome?  Readings in this class will include journalism, scholarship, and polemic, both contemporary and historical, that explores or illuminates our current clashes of the personal and the political.

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Internship

TBA

Sylvan Solloway

Internship

Instructor: Sylvan Solloway

Course ID: JOUR-UA 0980

Days: TBA

Room: 20 Cooper

DECLARED JOURNALISM MAJORS ONLY Hours Arranged

Prerequisites: Foundations, Inquiry, The Beat

To enroll:
1) Students must be declared journalism majors who have been offered an internship. The Career Services director must approve the internship. All sophomores must consult the director before applying for a credit internship.
2) No credit will be given for internships in advertising, marketing, public relations or the fashion/accessory closet.
3) Students may take the course for 1, 2, 3 or 4 credits but can earn no more than 4 credits total while attending the institute. Only one internship for credit is allowed per semester.

 

For moew information go to the Career Services section.

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Advanced Individualized Study

TBA

TBA

Advanced Individualized Study

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 997

Days: TBA

Room: TBA

To enroll in Advanced Individualized Study, an interested student must find a full-time faculty member to be a sponsor and then must develop and file a syllabus. The syllabus must be approved by the faculty member and the Journalism Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUS). It must list, in week by week fashion, all readings and all writing assignments that the student will undertake for the Advanced Individualized Study. Once approved, this syllabus constitutes your "contract" on the project and the student's work will be judged and graded with that in mind.

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Investigating Journalism (lecture)

Friday 12:30-3:00pm

Mitchell Stephens

Investigating Journalism (lecture)

Instructor: Mitchell Stephens

Course ID: JOUR-UA 501, Section 001

Days: Friday 12:30-3:00pm

Room: Silver 414

» Syllabus (PDF)

Journalism and Prospective Journalism Majors

JOUR-UA 501Investigating Journalism
(formerly  JOUR-UA 501 Foundations of Journalism)

This lecture course will introduce you to issues in journalistic writing and reporting, such as the choices journalists face in method, style, and form; the political impact of the news media; questions of sensationalism, bias, and diversity, and the current digital upheaval. To better understand what journalism has been and might be, students are also introduced to a selection of the best journalism, from Edward R. Murrow on migrant farm workers to Adrian Nicole LeBlanc on family life around the drug trade in the Bronx.
Your work will be reading the assigned pieces, coming to class ready to comment on and question them, preparing for some tests and producing a paper of two during the semester. (Unlike most of the courses in the Carter Institute and the Journalism major, this is not a reporting and writing course, though reporting and writing will often be discussed. )

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Journalism Ethics and First Amendment Law

M 6:20pm-8:50pm

George Freeman

Journalism Ethics and First Amendment Law

Instructor: George Freeman

Course ID: JOUR-UA 502.001

Days: M 6:20pm-8:50pm

Room: Silver 208

» Syllabus (PDF)

SPRING SEMESTERS ONLY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This course is designed to acquaint students with the basic protections and restrictions of the law as they apply to the media, as well as the ethical problems and dilemmas journalists face. First Amendment rights and legal and ethical responsibilities and limitations will be examined and discussed. The course will look at these questions from five viewpoints: from (i) the practical view of a journalist doing his job with (ii) heavy consideration of ethical imperatives, and (iii) from a legal prospective, all the while (iv) considering the rules in a public policy context- are they fair and appropriate in our society? -- while (v) noting the historical context in which they arise. Significant court cases and fundamental legal rules as well as past ethical scandals and issues will be explored in the context of political and historical realities, and in terms of journalistic standards and practices; contemporary media law issues and ethical problems and guidelines will also be focused on. Among the basic First Amendment issues which will be examined are libel, invasion of privacy, prior restraints, newsgathering and newsgathering torts, and the reporter's privilege; some of the ethical issues to be explored include objectivity in reporting, bias and transparency, conflicts of interest, and fair dealings with subjects, sources and advertisers.


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Journalism Ethics and First Amendment Law

W 6:20pm-8:50pm

David A. Kaplan

Journalism Ethics and First Amendment Law

Instructor: David A. Kaplan

Course ID: JOUR-UA 502.002

Days: W 6:20pm-8:50pm

Room: Silver 208

» Syllabus (PDF)

SPRING SEMESTERS ONLY

Prerequisites: Foundations

This course is designed to acquaint students with the basic protections and restrictions of the law as they apply to the media, as well as the ethical problems and dilemmas journalists face. First Amendment rights and legal and ethical responsibilities and limitations will be examined and discussed. The course will look at these questions from five viewpoints: from (i) the practical view of a journalist doing his job with (ii) heavy consideration of ethical imperatives, and (iii) from a legal prospective, all the while (iv) considering the rules in a public policy context- are they fair and appropriate in our society? -- while (v) noting the historical context in which they arise. Significant court cases and fundamental legal rules as well as past ethical scandals and issues will be explored in the context of political and historical realities, and in terms of journalistic standards and practices; contemporary media law issues and ethical problems and guidelines will also be focused on. Among the basic First Amendment issues which will be examined are libel, invasion of privacy, prior restraints, newsgathering and newsgathering torts, and the reporter's privilege; some of the ethical issues to be explored include objectivity in reporting, bias and transparency, conflicts of interest, and fair dealings with subjects, sources and advertisers.


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Journalistic Inquiry

Mon/Wed 10:00am-11:50am

Lambeth Hochwald

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Lambeth Hochwald

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101.002

Days: Mon/Wed 10:00am-11:50am

Room: 20 Cooper, room 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: JOUR-UA 501 Investigating Journalism

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.


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Journalistic Inquiry

Tu/Th 6:20pm-8:10pm

Tatsha Robertson

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Tatsha Robertson

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101.003

Days: Tu/Th 6:20pm-8:10pm

Room: 20 Cooper, room 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: JOUR-UA 501 Investigating Journalism

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.


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Journalistic Inquiry

Mon/Wed 6:30pm-8:30pm

Kenneth Paulsen

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Kenneth Paulsen

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101.004

Days: Mon/Wed 6:30pm-8:30pm

Room: 20 Cooper, room 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: JOUR-UA 501 Investigating Journalism

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.


[x] close.

Journalistic Inquiry

Tues/Thur 10:00am-11:50am

Keith Kloor

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Keith Kloor

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101.001

Days: Tues/Thur 10:00am-11:50am

Room: 20 Cooper, room 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: JOUR-UA 501 Investigating Journalism

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.

...

In this skills course, we will explore the world around us and look for stories beneath the surface. This section of Journalistic Inquiry is a fun, eye-opening journey to build a foundation for covering news and features with passion and creativity.

Bring a curious mind to this class as we cover news around the city. To get solid stories, let’s take the news and break it down. Analyze it and find experts and primary sources to bring our stories to life and give them a human dimension with telling quotes, anecdotes and thoughtful yet objective writing.

 

This will be a hands-on course aimed at making you confident multi-platform journalists, ready to take on assignments for print, TV and the Internet.  Along the way, you will meet and interview newsmakers and characters from the worlds of business, fashion, media and more in the classroom and field.

You will prepare for assignments and group interviews in advance. Stay on top of your email – I will act as an assignment manager, updating us on what’s planned for class and how to get ready.

As we venture where the news takes us, you will get a taste for whether you like this profession and are well-suited for it. This class holds a mirror to a working world you will soon enter.

These days, most journalism jobs require you to be well-versed in all media. Consider this class a hearty buffet from which we will get a sampling of spot news and feature reporting for print, radio, TV and the Internet.

Today you are students and you are journalists.  Enjoy the ride.

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Journalistic Inquiry

Tues/Thur 11:00am-12:50am

Joe Lapointe

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Joe Lapointe

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101.006

Days: Tues/Thur 11:00am-12:50am

Room: 20 Cooper, room 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: JOUR-UA 501 Investigating Journalism

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.


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Journalistic Inquiry

Tues/Thur 1:00pm-2:50pm

Fran Stern

Journalistic Inquiry

Instructor: Fran Stern

Course ID: JOUR-UA 101.007

Days: Tues/Thur 1:00pm-2:50pm

Room: 20 Cooper, room 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

JOURNALISTIC INQUIRY

Prerequisites: JOUR-UA 501 Investigating Journalism

This is the first-level reporting, research and writing course, which emphasizes in-depth research and interviewing technique as it introduces a variety of journalistic forms, including the reported essay, the newspaper pyramid style, magazine and newspaper feature style and broadcast newswriting style. The course focuses heavily on the critical and impartial examination of issues through research and reporting. Research methodology is key, as are observation and interview preparation and techniques. Research and reporting projects will include interviews, off- and on-line research, including books, government and non-governmental documents, interviews and databases, scholarly journals and other sources. This course provides a strong foundation in basic journalistic forms, issues and responsibilities.


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Advanced Reporting: Writing the Long Form Narative

M 2:00pm - 5:40pm

Adam L. Penenberg

Advanced Reporting: Writing the Long Form Narative

Instructor: Adam L. Penenberg

Course ID: JOUR-UA 301.001

Days: M 2:00pm - 5:40pm

Room: 20 Cooper, 7th Floor Library (rm. 700)

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: The Beat

This is the Capstone course. Subject matter varies from section to section, but the basic skeleton of the course is the same across sections: the emphasis is on development of the ability to produce writing and reporting within a sophisticated longform story structure. The course involves query writing, topic research and reading, interviewing, and repeated drafts and rewrites, leading to a full-length piece of writing aimed at a publishable level and the ability of the student to present the reporting orally.

---

This seminar focuses on the various components that comprise in-depth magazine stories and non-fiction books. We'll dissect great modern and classic magazine stories, books and book proposals for story, character arcs, dialogue, scenes, analysis, structure, transitions, verb tense, point of view and style. The goal is to figure out how memorable magazine features and narrative non-fiction books that keep your attention to the very last page are created, then to take what we've learned and apply it to our own work. There is one semester-long writing assignment—a 3,000+-word feature story—with several shorter related pieces involving scenes, character, dialogue, or analysis, all of which can be incorporated into your final story. Along the way we'll work on pitches, research and interview techniques, time management, outlines, editing and multiple drafts, and other challenges today's non-fiction narrative writers face.

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Advanced Reporting: Media Criticism

Mon 6:20pm-10:00pm

TBA

Advanced Reporting: Media Criticism

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-UA 301.004

Days: Mon 6:20pm-10:00pm

Room: 20 Cooper, room 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prerequisites: The Beat

Priority given to Media Criticism Students.

This is the Capstone course. Subject matter varies from section to section, but the basic skeleton of the course is the same across sections: the emphasis is on development of the ability to produce writing and reporting within a sophisticated longform story structure. The course involves query writing, topic research and reading, interviewing, and repeated drafts and rewrites, leading to a full-length piece of writing aimed at a publishable level and the ability of the student to present the reporting orally.

---

This course will examine the role of the news media in shaping events, with students
looking critically at the intersection of politics and the press. From the campaign bus to
the White House briefing room, journalists are expected to vet candidates and hold
elected leaders accountable. While journalists often succeed in uncovering truth and
shedding light on policymakers' decisions, they have also failed by promoting
misinformation and succumbing to groupthink and should be held accountable
themselves. These days, the media is facing an unprecedented volume of criticism from
all sides—liberal and conservative pundits, bloggers, independent fact checkers, and
engaged citizens on Twitter. But does this surge in media criticism help improve the
Fourth Estate or simply add static to an already noisy, hyper-politicized media
environment?

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History of the Media

Thur 12:30-3:00pm

Mitchell Stephens

History of the Media

Instructor: Mitchell Stephens

Course ID: JOUR-UA 610.001

Days: Thur 12:30-3:00pm

Room: 20 Cooper, room 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

An attempt to better understand the communications revolution we are undergoing through an investigation of the nature and consequences of previous communications revolutions. Using readings ranging from Plato to Sontag to Kundera, the course will look closely at the history of spoken language, images, writing, printing, photography, radio and television. How were they understood? How were they initially used or misused? What were their effects upon social patterns, politics and thought? What can that tell us about the potential and potential influence of digital communication?

 

*Priority given to Media Criticism Students. A permission code is required to register, contact the department at 212-998-7994 or undergraduate.journalism@nyu.edu.

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» Business and Economic Reporting

Investigative Reporting

T, 6:20-10pm

Mike McIntire

Investigative Reporting

Instructor: Mike McIntire

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.001

Days: T, 6:20-10pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

Your objective will be to master basic investigative tools and techniques, as well as how to apply them to everyday reporting and major enterprise pieces. We will explore how to take advantage of the two main sources of information—documents and people—and discuss when and how to use computer data to both enhance a story or provide the foundation for a major project. Throughout the course, the goal will be to constantly delve beneath the surface. Going deep is the essence of investigative reporting, which pulls together all publicly available information, as well as harder-to-find material, to present the fullest possible picture. Corporations and powerful individuals employ armies of PR experts, lawyers and lobbyists to ensure that only their version of reality prevails, and it is the lonely duty of journalists to dispel this fog of self-interest. At least as important as mastering the technical skills will be learning to think critically and skeptically. The relentlessly upbeat press release, the carefully worded SEC filing or the late-Friday-afternoon earnings statement each, as a matter of course, should be probed for accuracy and omission. What important development went unsaid? Did the company chairman really resign to “spend more time with his family”?

 

Open to BER students only.

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WRRII - BER

M, 10am-3:50pm

Leslie Wayne

WRRII - BER

Instructor: Leslie Wayne

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1022.001

Days: M, 10am-3:50pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

Writing, Research & Reporting II: BER is designed as a feature writing class that focuses on business, and which builds on skills you acquired in WRRI. Over the course of the semester you’ll study the craft of magazine writing, come up with story ideas, participate in editorial meetings, write multiple drafts of feature stories and a column, read and discuss classic business books and articles and create and update your own business-centric blogs. To keep your deadline news skills fresh, you’ll also at times be assigned hard news business articles in class. In addition, I’ll invite magazine editors from some of the big books to come in and relate their experiences.

Open to BER students only.

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» Cultural Reporting and Criticism

Perspectives on Race and Class

Wednesday, 4:00-8:00pm

Susie Linfield

Perspectives on Race and Class

Instructor: Susie Linfield

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1281.002

Days: Wednesday, 4:00-8:00pm

Room: 700

» Syllabus (PDF)

This  seminar examines the ways in which some of the major writers of the 20th and early 21st-centuries have reported on the key and ever-controversial issues of race and class. We will look at how these issues have, historically, been written about, and at how some of today's best reporters and essayists are approaching them; and we will explore how concepts of class and race have changed over the last century. Among the writers whose works we'll study are W.E.B. Du Bois, James Agee, George Orwell, James Baldwin, Jamaica Kincaid, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., William Finnegan, Anthony Lewis., and Orlando Patterson. We'll explore controversial issues such as affirmative action, the increasing polarization of wealth, and the legacy of slavery. This is an intensive reading course with a major final project.

CRC priority; others with permission of instructor.

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Reporting Social Worlds

Thursday, 4:00pm-7:40pm

Amy Waldman

Reporting Social Worlds

Instructor: Amy Waldman

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.007

Days: Thursday, 4:00pm-7:40pm

Room: Library

» Syllabus (PDF)

The focus of this course will be reporting on the myriad small worlds and social groups—generated by social identities, hangouts, neighborhoods, institutions, occupations, beliefs, interests—that define the texture of contemporary life and increasingly shape the news, especially in a city as culturally rich and various as New York. Writing, reading, and discussion will emphasize constructing a narrative and observing and describing the details essential to depicting social and cultural milieus with accuracy and power. Students will also be expected to pay close attention to the assumptions and thought processes that go into shaping their stories. The best writing on social groups and milieus reflects both assiduous attention to reporting and a strong, individual voice and vision. We all belong to a variety of social worlds, and the better we understand our own relationship to those worlds, the more we will be prepared as journalists to understand other people's.

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Advanced Critical Essay

Tuesday, 6-9:40pm

Ben Ratliff

Advanced Critical Essay

Instructor: Ben Ratliff

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1281.001

Days: Tuesday, 6-9:40pm

Room: 700

» Syllabus (PDF)

This is an advanced course in the reading and practice of the long-form essay, which means nonfiction-with-a-thesis on a cultural topic that is longer than a brief review and shorter than a big book: essentially, swimming in a lake, as opposed to in a pool or an ocean. It consists of the readings below, class discussions, and the production of one long essay by the end of the semester, for which you will do two drafts.

 We will be reading various kinds of work—a critical reading of a single artist; commentary and New Journalism on cultural-social-political themes; personal essays; lyric essays; polemics.  Among the names below are famous critics, as well as writers known primarily as journalists, novelists, historians or poets.  I have made an effort to include some very recent writing here as well as what’s old and established.  Our focus here is “criticism,” in a broad sense, but through the term we will be looking at how a writer can turn an argument and thesis into a narrative that makes a reader want to keep reading.  We will separate and identify the qualities that make all these pieces sing: thesis, tone, rhythm, rhetorical style, counterintuitive thinking, vocabulary, confidence, authority, evidence, tight or loose focus, trustworthiness, daring.

 

CRC Only

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» Literary Reportage

WRRII - LitRep: Ethnography for Journalists

R, 9:00am-12:40pm

Ted Conover

WRRII - LitRep: Ethnography for Journalists

Instructor: Ted Conover

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1022.007

Days: R, 9:00am-12:40pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

Long-form journalism is often concerned with the story of people's lives over time, and the work of many celebrated journalists has strong ethnographic components, whether pursued consciously or not. Adrian LeBlanc's Random Family is one example. Sebastian Junger's The Perfect Storm and War are two more (and Junger, who majored in anthropology, more than once has cited his debt to the discipline). Leon Dash, William Finnegan, and Alex Kotlowitz are other writers who believe in the payoffs to their journalism of immersive, in-depth research that is essentially ethnographic.

Using that kind of research to do journalism is what this course is about. We'll start with a look at some classic studies and learn how the ethnographic tradition arose. Next will be a short course in ethnographic fieldwork: How is it different from traditional journalistic research, and how does one do it? Finally, students will identify a person (it could be a bodega owner or a skateboarder), or small group of people (it could be a girls' soccer team, a group of Masons, or political activists) whose lives they will study over several weeks and then write about.

 

Literary Reportage priority, others by permission of the instructor.

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Portfolio 1

Tuesday, 2:30pm-5:30pm

Robert S. Boynton

Portfolio 1

Instructor: Robert S. Boynton

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.003

Days: Tuesday, 2:30pm-5:30pm

Room: Library

Description to come.

 

Literary Reportage priority. Instructor permission required.

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» Magazine Writing

WRRII - Magazine

W, 3-8:50pm

Caroline Miller

WRRII - Magazine

Instructor: Caroline Miller

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1022.003

Days: W, 3-8:50pm

Room: 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course will essentially put you to work as a magazine writer. You will try your hand at a range of magazine pieces: a Q&A, a narrative feature, a service piece, a trend piece, a personal essay, a profile. In each case, we’ll read some examples of the genre, exploring what makes them exciting pieces of writing, and effective for a particular publication, whether print or online. We’ll focus on structure, voice, point of view, the money quote, the kind of detail that effectively invokes character and makes pieces memorable. You’ll pitch ideas before you tackle each piece; we’ll talk about reporting, interviewing and writing strategies before you jump in. Each of the pieces you write will be critiqued (by me and by other students) and you’ll be asked, as you would be by your editor, to revise. We’ll hear from visiting writers and editors who will talk about some of these things (among others): How to get people to say interesting, revealing, surprising, indiscreet things. How to use public sources of information to give pieces teeth. How to work and play well with editors: What editors love (and hate) in a writer, and vice versa. What might a journalism career look like over the next 10 years? How can you prepare for a field in which not only the technology but the business model is up for grabs?

 

Open to Magazine students only.

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WRRII - Magazine

R, 10am-3:50pm

Mary W. Quigley

WRRII - Magazine

Instructor: Mary W. Quigley

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1022.005

Days: R, 10am-3:50pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

WRII is the second half of our year-long writing and reporting class. This semester you will ramp up the basic skills to tackle more challenging writing assignments typical to magazines, both online and print. You will also choose a beat in an area that interests you and learn to develop story ideas, to access experts and research, and to report and write articles ranging from service pieces, to profiles, to personal essays to narratives. You will keep a blog on your research and reporting that will become, by semester’s end, a calling card to demonstrate your depth of knowledge on a particular beat. The blog will include multi-media elements such as slide shows. You will also work on developing your own distinctive voice. The gal of this class is to have students produce –and pitch—magazine articles.

 

Open to Magazine students only.

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» News and Documentary

TV Reporting II

Wednesday, 4:00-8:00pm

Jason Samuels

TV Reporting II

Instructor: Jason Samuels

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1172.001

Days: Wednesday, 4:00-8:00pm

Room: 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

This advanced video journalism class is intended to sharpen your reporting, and production skills.

You will be challenged to research and pitch compelling stories, and then produce short and long-form video segments. These segments will be produced for online and cable distribution.

You will be expected to master traditional news production techniques -and experiment. An emphasis will be placed on developing your proficiency as a one-person production unit in the field, a "digital backpack journalist" able to shoot and edit without assistance.

During the semester we will also spend plenty of time examining the changing form of video journalism on broadcast television, cable television and the web.

 

Open to NewsDoc students only.

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Visual Thinking

Tuesday, 6:00pm-10pm

Kirsten Johnson

Visual Thinking

Instructor: Kirsten Johnson

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1148.001

Days: Tuesday, 6:00pm-10pm

Room: 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

The class explores the complexity of documentary visualization through cinematography.  It will examine not only how stories get told, but also how we might inspire new ways of telling them visually.  This class will immerse the students in the challenges of different approaches and shooting styles through production exercises and through significant documentary examples.

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» Reporting New York

WRRII - RTN/RNY

Monday, 11:00am-4:50pm

Yvonne Latty

WRRII - RTN/RNY

Instructor: Yvonne Latty

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1022.004

Days: Monday, 11:00am-4:50pm

Room: 655

In this class, you'll be on the job. You will be a professional journalist who will meet deadlines and make your stories stand out. You will work on the skills you need to succeed in this field, but that only happens with practice. You and your classmates will become colleagues who will work together on stories to become an efficient newsroom. Your goal is to finish this class with the skills, experiences, confidence and swagger that will be key to your success in a business that is changing dramatically. You will file stories on our online site, "Pavement Pieces," which is a showcase to premiere your best work. This is a multimedia class so you will be shooting video, taking photos and creating slideshows on your city beat, in addition to writing lots of stories. You will also have to blog your beat.

 

Open to RTN students only.

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» Reporting the Nation

WRRII - RTN/RNY

Monday, 11:00am-4:50pm

Yvonne Latty

WRRII - RTN/RNY

Instructor: Yvonne Latty

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1022.004

Days: Monday, 11:00am-4:50pm

Room: 655

In this class, you'll be on the job. You will be a professional journalist who will meet deadlines and make your stories stand out. You will work on the skills you need to succeed in this field, but that only happens with practice. You and your classmates will become colleagues who will work together on stories to become an efficient newsroom. Your goal is to finish this class with the skills, experiences, confidence and swagger that will be key to your success in a business that is changing dramatically. You will file stories on our online site, "Pavement Pieces," which is a showcase to premiere your best work. This is a multimedia class so you will be shooting video, taking photos and creating slideshows on your city beat, in addition to writing lots of stories. You will also have to blog your beat.

 

Open to RTN students only.

[x] close.

» Science, Health and Environmental Reporting

Environmental Reporting

Wednesday, 10am-1pm

Dan Fagin

Environmental Reporting

Instructor: Dan Fagin

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1188.001

Days: Wednesday, 10am-1pm

Room: Room 652

.

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WRRII - SHERP

Monday, 10am-3:15pm

Stephen S. Hall

WRRII - SHERP

Instructor: Stephen S. Hall

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1022.002

Days: Monday, 10am-3:15pm

Room: 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

Writing and Reporting Workshop II is an introduction to long-form science journalism. Drawing on the narrative techniques of great fiction, students will produce news features, books (proposals and outlines), reported essays, stand-alone videos and explanatory pieces. In addition to these major assignments, there will be extensive in-class writing and reading exercises, including character sketches, op-eds and close textual analysis. Most classes will also reserve time for an informal "story meeting," where students will pitch story ideas. This will culminate with a formal query letter pitched to a specific media outlet.

 

Open to SHERP students only.

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» Studio 20

WRRII - Studio20

Friday, 1-4:40pm

Jason Maloney

WRRII - Studio20

Instructor: Jason Maloney

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1022.008

Days: Friday, 1-4:40pm

Room: 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

This Studio 20 version of Writing, Research and Reporting II is specifically geared towards mastering multimedia reporting and production techniques. In 14 weeks, students will develop the skills to expand their reporting abilities into the areas of basic photography, audio production and, most significantly, video production.

 This course is not just an academic exercise. In fact, the class will function at times more like an actual newsroom. We will use New York City as our assignment area and produce real audiovisual content on a regular basis. As students will own their own media, they will have the option to place it on any news site or blog they wish. They will also benefit from having the ability to produce content for the Local East Village, the Hyperlocal news blog that is a joint venture between the New York Times and NYU.

While much of what we will learn in WRRII will be of a technical skills nature, for example practicing how to shoot sequences, learning basic effects in Final Cut Pro, our main priority will be to learn and practice the essential elements of visual storytelling. While the basics can be discussed in our classroom setting, and we will devote a certain amount of our time to watching examples of excellence in visual storytelling, this is a skill that is best learned by doing. So it will be a key component of our field work: focusing on how to best use the visual medium to tell our stories. We will also learn to exercise our judgment as to which media can be used to best tell which stories.

 

At the successful conclusion of the course, students will have learned how to develop, produce, edit and deliver multi-media stories. This includes demonstrated proficiency in:

•           Shooting basic video and acquiring professional audio

•           Editing video and audio; encoding projects for final delivery to a variety of outlets

•           Use of basic video titling, manipulating and editing still photographs for use in video projects or creating

             audio slideshows

•           Introductory audio and video effects 

•           Audio and Video storytelling techniques: how to produce visual narratives.

 

This course represents a rare, exciting and meaningful opportunity for professional growth. These multi-media production abilities are the kinds of skills that will be required to be competitive for many jobs. Students will leave the course with not only new skills and knowledge, but with at least the start of a “clip reel”.

[x] close.

Studio Two

Monday, 2:00pm-6:15pm

Clay Shirky

Studio Two

Instructor: Clay Shirky

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.002

Days: Monday, 2:00pm-6:15pm

Room: 654

In Studio Two, students in the Studio 20 program, and others who request to take the course and receive permission from the instructor, tackle one large project in web development: as a team.  The project chosen will vary from term to term, but it always be an adventure in web journalism, and it will always have a media partner-- typically a news organization or existing journalism site that wants to do something new or collaborate with Studio 20 on an extension of its current editorial presence.

Students participate in all phases of the project: background research, news ecosystem analysis, technology assessment, design and conception, prototyping, editorial work flow, content production, testing, launch, feedback and adjustment, de-bugging, iteration and evaluation.  They collaborate actively and in person with the media partner.  They learn to divide up tasks and coordinate the different parts of the project.  They try to push the envelope and do something effective but also innovative in web journalism that meets the partner's goals, works for the users and adds to the reputation of Studio 20.

Studio Two is a required course for students in the Studio 20 concentration. A limited number of spaces are available for students in other programs and disciplines, especially if they bring skills to the project that the project needs.  Permission of instructor is required.  Contact Professor Jay Rosen if you are interested in being added to the course.  Professor Rosen is particularly seeking students with knowledge of graphic design for the web, all aspects of web production, computer programming, or expertise in the wordpress.com content management system.

 

Open to Studio20 students only.

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» Graduate Electives

The Personal Essay (Longform Essay)

Tuesday, 2:00pm-6:00pm

Perri Klass

The Personal Essay (Longform Essay)

Instructor: Perri Klass

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.008

Days: Tuesday, 2:00pm-6:00pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course examines the long, thoughtful, and well-written personal essay, and the power and privilege of using the first person, as narrative voice, as perspective, and as technique.  We will be looking at how research and reporting can be presented in the first person, and we will be examining memoir, but most particularly at memoir which goes beyond the strictly personal. We will discuss the pleasures and pitfalls of writing about yourself as a character in serious nonfiction, the complexities of keeping your distance and coming too close, and of course, the interplay of experience and accuracy, memory and narrative.  We’ll look at personal narratives constructed for purposes of entertainment, advocacy, intellectual discovery, and even revenge.  And we shall consider the always intriguing question raised by the first line of David Copperfield: "Whether I shall turn out to be the hero of my own life, or whether that station will be held by anybody else, these pages must s how."  We will examine essays which incorporate research and reportage, journeys and personal narratives, memoirs and deliberately constructed adventures. We will deliberately attempt the transformation of memoir and memory into personal essay, and of reported experience into personal essay. Our theme will be the use of the personal essay format, and the incorporation of the personal narrative voice, in strongly written pieces which address a wide variety of issues, at home (literally) and out in the great wide world. We will talk about the many options for presenting reported material, and about the advantages—and pitfalls—of the personal voice. We will talk about the writer’s job of constructing that personal voice in an essay, and about the essential job of writing a personal essay which is about more than that personal voice and that personal perspective.

[x] close.

The Editor's Vision

M, 2:00-5:40pm

Alexis Gelber

The Editor's Vision

Instructor: Alexis Gelber

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1019.001

Days: M, 2:00-5:40pm

Room: 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

The class will examine how editors imprint their own sensibility on a magazine, woo an audience and develop a unique identity for their publication. Coming up with the right mix of articles is a constant challenge; editors are always trying to re-invent the formula as well as struggling to find interesting ways to package service pieces or celebrity profiles, or come up with catchy covers and headlines to boost newsstand circulation.

New magazines evolve either from one person's passionate idea (Esquire and its founder Arnold Gingrich, Tina Brown and the Daily Beast) or are launched by corporate magazine development departments (Oprah, Real Simple, Lucky). This class will examine the history and evolution of magazines, from the hits and misses (Portfolio, Domino) of recent years to a look back at the past. Weekly classes will focus on different aspects of magazine-making, and leading editors, art directors and photo editors will visit as guest speakers to provide their expert insights.

Magazine Priority

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Data Journalism

Wednesday, 6:30pm-10pm

Kevin Quealy

Data Journalism

Instructor: Kevin Quealy

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1070.001

Days: Wednesday, 6:30pm-10pm

Room: Room 652

In this class, students will learn to collect, analyze and present data in an immersive, hands-on course from members of the New York Times's graphics department. A lengthy portion of each class is devoted to real-life examples, emphasizing the skills newsrooms want. How can web scripting help a reporter track down runners who may have witnessed explosions in the Boston Marathon bombings? How can a map illustrate the challenges in developing gun policy? Why is data cleaning required to uncover the influence of money in visits to the White House? More than ever, these new ways of telling stories require data skills.

While the course's main goal is journalistic, not technical, students will write and program web pages in HTML, CSS and Javascript; use Git to share and reuse code; merge, sort, filter and aggregate data sets in Excel and R; and make charts to show changes over time and maps to visualize spatial relationships. In the process, students will learn how to use data to strengthen and improve their reporting process.

Fluency with data and the ability to ask and answer questions from structured information sources can help any journalist, whether she's a radio producer, magazine writer or digital producer. In past course evaluations, 41 of 43 students — with a wide variety of interests and technical backgrounds — have said they would recommend the class to a friend. 

SHERP and Studio 20 Priority

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Data Journalism

Tuesday, 6:30pm-10pm

Amanda Cox

Data Journalism

Instructor: Amanda Cox

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1070.002

Days: Tuesday, 6:30pm-10pm

Room: Room 653

 

In this class, students will learn to collect, analyze and present data in an immersive, hands-on course from members of the New York Times's graphics department.
A lengthy portion of each class is devoted to real-life examples, emphasizing the skills newsrooms want. How can web scripting help a reporter track down runners who may have witnessed explosions in the Boston Marathon bombings? How can a map illustrate the challenges in developing gun policy? Why is data cleaning required to uncover the influence of money in visits to the White House? More than ever, these new ways of telling stories require data skills.
While the course's main goal is journalistic, not technical, students will write and program web pages in HTML, CSS and Javascript; use Git to share and reuse code; merge, sort, filter and aggregate data sets in Excel and R; and make charts to show changes over time and maps to visualize spatial relationships. In the process, students will learn how to use data to strengthen and improve their reporting process.
Fluency with data and the ability to ask and answer questions from structured information sources can help any journalist, whether she's a radio producer, magazine writer or digital producer. In past course evaluations, 41 of 43 students — with a wide variety of interests and technical backgrounds — have said they would recommend the class to a friend. 

SHERP and Studio 20 priority

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Photojournalism

Wednesday, 11am-2:40pm

Lori Grinker

Photojournalism

Instructor: Lori Grinker

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.009

Days: Wednesday, 11am-2:40pm

Room: 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

 

This course is about the development of knowledge through photography. As the lines begin to blur 
between documentary photography, photojournalism, vernacular photographs and fine art, how can a 
personal photographic project fit in with new storytelling possibilities such as multimedia platforms, 
smart camera documentation, audio slideshows, tablet e-readers, while addressing social issues in 
depth? Some documentary photographers approach a subject with a clear agenda for prescriptive 
change, some come with a direction, technique, or a subject area, some come seeking answers, often 
in the form of stories or essays, and others seek to portray a psychological reality or state of mind. In 
many cases, a new understanding of the world, or at least one aspect of the world, is achieved. 
Besides imparting an understanding of this process, this course poses the question: How will you 
document the social, political, economic, and cultural issues of today and cultivate a narrative with 
still images? 

This course is about the development of knowledge through photography. As the lines begin to blur

between documentary photography, photojournalism, vernacular photographs and fine art, how can a

personal photographic project fit in with new storytelling possibilities such as multimedia platforms,

smart camera documentation, audio slideshows, tablet e-readers, while addressing social issues in

depth? Some documentary photographers approach a subject with a clear agenda for prescriptive

change, some come with a direction, technique, or a subject area, some come seeking answers, often

in the form of stories or essays, and others seek to portray a psychological reality or state of mind. In

many cases, a new understanding of the world, or at least one aspect of the world, is achieved.

Besides imparting an understanding of this process, this course poses the question: How will you

document the social, political, economic, and cultural issues of today and cultivate a narrative with

still images?

How will you document a neighborhood of your city; how will you interpret what you see when you

look through your viewfinder? What knowledge emerges when you discuss and edit your work? And

most basically, how do you begin?

Projects and Goals

Focusing on the social issues and cultural life of New York City, students will work individually or

collaboratively on a photographic project while studying traditional and contemporary documentary

photography, and fieldwork practices. Class sessions will examine the issues: defining a theme,

personal vision, editing, technical knowhow, and critique. Students will help critique each other’s

work; discussions will focus on technique, light, composition; what makes a good photograph. The

final result will be an exhibition in the College halls where the course is held. Students will acquire

the capacity to develop knowledge through seeing.

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Bedford and Bowery

Paid internship, minimum two-day commitment

Daniel Maurer

Bedford and Bowery

Instructor: Daniel Maurer

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1290.005

Days: Paid internship, minimum two-day commitment

Room: 7th floor

This paid opportunity – available each semester to a select number of grad students and recent graduates – allows you to write for New York magazine’s Bedford + Bowery. The "best new local blog" (per L magazine) covers the East Village, Lower East Side, North Brooklyn, and beyond.

This course can be taken as an internship for 1, 2, 3, or 4 credits (counting toward your internship credits) or as an elective for 4 credits (counting as academic credits that need not go toward your internship credits but are the equivalent of a 4-credit class). Either way, you will be required to commit two full days per week to the site.  

We're seeking reporters that are eager to produce lively, engaging, and timely stories about some of the city’s great neighborhoods. Applicants will ideally be savvy about the neighborhoods listed above or at the very least eager to explore them to the hilt, with an eye for news minutia as well as larger stories in the areas of education, politics, crime, housing and real estate, arts and culture, and business openings and closings, to name just some of our areas of coverage. You should be able to cultivate sources and write quickly and accurately, with an engaging, “bloggy” tone and sense of humor when appropriate.  

This internship will require that you act as a news runner two days per week from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.You’ll be on call at 20 Cooper Square to report stories as assigned by the site's editor. Since you’ll also be encouraged to pitch stories and even come up with ideas for regular columns during editorial meetings, creative thinking and a familiarity with the blogosphere is a plus. We’re looking for someone who is proactive, eager to share ideas, and has a sense of fun. But above all, the site strives to be the first to report neighborhood news in a competitive environment; you should be able to thrive under tight deadlines and turn around copy that meets the standards of New York magazine, editors of which will work closely with the site in case a story warrants pick-up across other New York magazine blogs or in the newspaper. You should expect to write at least one story per day, and be able to work on longer features while also producing shorter items.

Applicants should be competent in digital photography, since they’ll be expected to take photos for stories; experience with video reporting and editing is a plus, as is a familiarity with social media. In addition to reporting duties, you may be asked to create event listings, link dumps, and the like.

Please register with Charles Reinhardt and also send a copy of your C.V. and any relevant clips to the editor, Daniel Maurer, at danielm@nyu.edu.  

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The Digital Newsroom

Thursday, 1:00pm-9:00pm

Adrian Mihai Joe Peyronnin

The Digital Newsroom

Instructor: Adrian Mihai Joe Peyronnin

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.006

Days: Thursday, 1:00pm-9:00pm

Room: Studio

» Syllabus (PDF)

The weekly schedule will be divided in two sections: 1-6pm and 6-9pm. Students will be assigned to one section each week.

Digital Newsroom is a new course offering that will combine TV Newscast and iBeat Reporting to allow graduate students to develop a comprehensive set of skills that will prepare them for a career in video journalism.  It is a holistic that will expand the scope of the newscast and meet the needs of a wide range of students.  It will also introduce the idea of entrepreneurial journalism for those students with a video emphasis.

The merged classes will function as cross training in a real newsroom environment as opposed to learning each function in isolation.  We believe that this approach will allow students to better experience the energy, collaborative nature and deadline pressure of a daily news operation.  By bringing these two classes together students will be able to develop their reporting and writing skills, achieve fluency with a wide range of newsroom production tools and gain basic understanding of how to produce a newscast and, through a rotation, focus more heavily on field reporting, advanced editing and camera techniques, and live reporting.  The class will also encourage media crossover and experimentation.   For instance, students will be able to use iPhones and other mobile devices in newsgathering and editing.  

Over the semester students will rotate among each typical newsroom position.  These positions include reporter, writer, executive producer, director, anchor, camera and so on.  Students will be given the opportunity to spend more time focusing on a position that interests them most, yet they will be exposed to all the positions.

 NewsDoc/RTN/RNY Priority

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Profiles

Friday, 11:00am-2:40pm

Frank Flaherty

Profiles

Instructor: Frank Flaherty

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1231.003

Days: Friday, 11:00am-2:40pm

Room: 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

What makes a magazine profile grab you from the start and keep you reading for 500 words—or 5,000? How do you get subjects to give you the access you need to show them as they really are? What are the various approaches to crafting a narrative and telling a story that makes the subject come alive? How do you choose which truth to tell—there are always many—about the person you're profiling? The goal of this course is to learn the basic rules of profile writing, from pre- and post-reporting around the subject to creating a level of trust with him or her to formulating a writing plan of action to crafting the final tale. By semester's end you will have written several profiles of different approaches and lengths, from a 500-word person-in-the-news story to a Q&As to a full-fledged richly-textured portrait. We will read and analyze current and classic profiles. focusing especially on the use of scenes, quotes, background information and authorial interjects. Classes will include guest speakers from the print or digital magazine space—editors and writers in sports, music, business, film, politics, culture and TV journalism—who will share stories, lessons and, perhaps, connections and advice for your own forays into professional profile writing.

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Storytellers

Wednesday, 10:00am-1:40pm

David Samuels

Storytellers

Instructor: David Samuels

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1231.001

Days: Wednesday, 10:00am-1:40pm

Room: 700

» Syllabus (PDF)

Great stories are shaped by talented, reckless, funny, arrogant and often misanthropic writers and reporters working at the height of their craft. In this class, we will study how world-shaking historical events and everyday experiences alike can be crafted into original journalistic narratives. We will concentrate on the writer's angle of approach to the subject - his or her ÒvoiceÓ - which is made more or less convincing through his or her control over language and the depth and range of his/her reporting. The first half of each class will consist of close readings of nonfiction narratives on Balkan wars, acid trips, nervous breakdowns, rock and roll concerts, a sarin gas attack in the Tokyo subways, a visit to the Iowa State Fair and assorted other subjects by some of my favorite journalists and novelists including Tom Wolfe, Joan Didion, David Foster Wallace, Denis Johnson, Rebecca West, Ryszard Kapucinski, Haruki Murakami, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Joseph Mitchell. Each class will begin promptly at 12:30 PM and will be divided between an hour and thirty minute discussion of the assigned reading and an hour and fifteen minute discussion of your written work. Latecomers will be greeted with derision. We will break at 2 PM for afternoon snack. We will also enjoy visits from enlivening and informative guests from Harper's, The New Yorker and other high-class venues, who can answer any questions you might have about reporting and editing, and who will help you shape your ideas with an eye towards publishing your own work.

Magazine Priority

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Entrepreneurial Journalism

Friday, 1:00pm-4:40pm

Adam L. Penenberg

Entrepreneurial Journalism

Instructor: Adam L. Penenberg

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1025.001

Days: Friday, 1:00pm-4:40pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

Journalists who can successfully navigate these turbulent media times must be equal parts journalist and entrepreneur. In this seminar students will learn the basics of journalistic entrepreneurism: brand management, basic web design (mainly user scenarios, information flow and database modeling), the use of social media platforms, how to develop business models, innovate within an existing company, and attract capital. There will be a lot of learning by doing. Students will have a choice to run their own blog-based business (posting, selling ads, marketing their work) or track and profile an existing startup. The semester will culminate with students either drafting their own business plan for a media start-up that they will pitch in class, or completing a 3500-word, publishable business profile. Guests will include well-known journalists, corporate innovation managers, successful media entrepreneurs, and investors.

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Radio Reporting

Tuesday, 10:00am-1:40pm

Farai Chideya

Radio Reporting

Instructor: Farai Chideya

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1171.001

Days: Tuesday, 10:00am-1:40pm

Room: 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

The first step in producing radio is learning to listen to sound the way we attune ourselves to important conversations: carefully and critically. Both words and “nat sound” – birds chirping; the beep of garbage trucks backing up; gunfire – are necessary to tell complex audio stories.


This class will offer the chance to master short-form radio news production in public radio’s modes, and offer a contextual overview of other radio news forms (commerical newscasts; radio documentaries). The foundation of listening can be applied to production this way:

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Eating New York

Tuesday, 10am-1:40pm

Meryl Gordon

Eating New York

Instructor: Meryl Gordon

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1231.002

Days: Tuesday, 10am-1:40pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

Celebrity chefs and their tv empires, illegal immigrant waiters living an underground existence, an activist city government banning transfats and upgrading school cafeteria food, street vendors fighting for space in front of the Metropolitan Museum, stores advertising low-cal ice cream that in reality packs on the pounds, blocks with dozens of Indian restaurants side-by-side - there are an endless number of great stories to be done about Manhattan's high and low food chain. Combining intensive reading, reporting and writing, this course would use the food world as a laboratory. Students will tackle a wide array of  stories revolving around food, dealing with larger issues such as economics, social class, environmental and health safety issues, government action and pure aesthetics. The goal is to make students comfortable with the subject area, as well as teach them how to find memorable stories in seemingly humdrum situations. Required for this course: a good appetite and a healthy curiosity.

Tentative reading for the class would include Michael Pollan's In Defense of Food, Calvin Trillan's Alice Let's Eat, Ruth Reichl's Comfort Me with Apples, Anthony Bourdain's Kitchen Confidential, Danny Meyer's Setting the Table, and Jennifer 8. Lee's Fortune Cookie Chronicles: Adventures in the World of Chinese Food.

Magazine Priority

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Political Cinema

Friday, 9:30am-1:10pm

Shimon Dotan

Political Cinema

Instructor: Shimon Dotan

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.004

Days: Friday, 9:30am-1:10pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

In contemporary war, "the other" is viewed not only as an enemy to be fought but, often, as one to be eliminated. How do journalists and filmmakers fight against (or, alternately, reinforce) such deadly representations? This class will focus primarily (though not exclusively) on one of the world's most conflict-ridden regions--the Middle East--though it will also explore films from Soviet Russia, Nazi Germany, and the United States. Through journalistic readings and film screenings, we will explore how "the other" is constructed: politically, aesthetically, ethically. This class is designed for anyone interested in contemporary politics and history, especially those of the Mideast; the journalism of conflict and violence, and the ethical questions associated with them; filmmaking; and film criticism.

NewsDoc and CRC priority.

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