Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute at New York University

Course Listings | Fall 2014

Course information subject to change. Please check back frequently for updates. All courses are at 20 Cooper Square unless otherwise noted. To view a course description and syllabus, click on each course’s Title. Electives are the last tab and are available to all students.

» Business and Economic Reporting

Law & Mass Communication - BER

Monday, 1:30-4:00pm

Stephen D. Solomon

Law & Mass Communication - BER

Instructor: Stephen D. Solomon

Course ID: JOUR-GA 0011.003

Days: Monday, 1:30-4:00pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

Although the First Amendment appears on its face to prohibit any governmental restrictions on the press, the U.S. Supreme Court in fact balances free and open expression against other vital interests of society. This course begins by examining the struggle against seditious libel (the crime of criticizing government or its officials) that was not won in this country until the landmark decision in New York Times v. Sullivan in 1964. Students will examine freedom of the press through the prism of a rich variety of contemporary conflicts, including libel, newsgathering problems, the right of privacy, prior restraint, and the conflict between free press and fair trial. Readings include a The First Amendment and the Fourth Estate; Make No Law by Anthony Lewis, The Unwanted Gaze by Jeffrey Rosen, and Origins of the Bill of Rights by Leonard Levy. Students write five papers during the semester.

 

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WRR I - BER

Tuesday, 8:30am-2:20pm

Adam L. Penenberg

WRR I - BER

Instructor: Adam L. Penenberg

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.001

Days: Tuesday, 8:30am-2:20pm

Room: 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

Writing, Research & Reporting I: BER is designed to teach the basic skills you'll need to write news stories for business publications. You'll learn everything from how to write on a daily (or even hourly) deadline for newspapers and wire services to penning short pieces for magazines. The emphasis will be on learning by doing, with regular reporting and writing assignments inside and outside of class. We'll workshop your stories in class, dissect current media coverage, take field trips to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Conference Board and New York Stock Exchange, and analyze the merit and structure of good (and bad) news stories. You'll be expected to stay abreast of the news, and to read The New York Times and Wall Street Journal regularly, as well as a number of business magazines (Fortune, Forbes, BusinessWeek, etc.) and websites. By the end of the semester, you should be able to write snappy ledes and smart nut grafs in your sleep—the first step in becoming a first rate journalist—and have the requisite skills to write tight, informative business stories. (Note: WRII covers longer magazine features.) In addition, we'll be working closely with the Internship Director to prepare you for landing a quality internship.

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Writing the Long Form Narrative

Thursday, 1:30-5:10pm

Adam L. Penenberg

Writing the Long Form Narrative

Instructor: Adam L. Penenberg

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.003

Days: Thursday, 1:30-5:10pm

Room: Library

» Syllabus (PDF)

This seminar focuses on the various components that comprise in-depth magazine stories and non-fiction books. We'll dissect great modern and classic magazine stories, books and book proposals for story, character arcs, dialogue, scenes, analysis, structure, transitions, verb tense, point of view and style. The goal is to figure out how memorable magazine features and narrative non-fiction books that keep your attention to the very last page are created, then to take what we've learned and apply it to our own work. There is one semester-long writing assignment—a 3,000+-word feature story—with several shorter related pieces involving scenes, character, dialogue, or analysis, all of which can be incorporated into your final story. Along the way we'll work on pitches, research and interview techniques, time management, outlines, editing and multiple drafts, and other challenges today's non-fiction narrative writers face.

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Multimedia Storytelling

Friday, 1:00pm-4:40pm

Jason Samuels

Multimedia Storytelling

Instructor: Jason Samuels

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1080.002

Days: Friday, 1:00pm-4:40pm

Room: 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

The basic requirement of the course is to learn how to produce multi-media content, as applied through reporting on Lower Manhattan and North Brooklyn for the Bedford and Bowery blog.

BER students should register for this section.

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Fieldwork - BER

TBA

TBA

Fieldwork - BER

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1290.002

Days: TBA

Room: TBA

See instructor for more details.

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» Cultural Reporting and Criticism

Cultural Conversation

Tuesday, 4:00pm-8:00pm

Charles Taylor

Cultural Conversation

Instructor: Charles Taylor

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1181.001

Days: Tuesday, 4:00pm-8:00pm

Room: 7th Floor Library

» Syllabus (PDF)

The primary purpose of this course is to inculcate habits of thinking that are vital to informed and intelligent cultural reporting and criticism. This does not mean that students will be taught "theories" of cultural writing, which they can then apply to their "practice." Rather, the point is that your thought process-as you write a piece, as you prepare to write it, or even before that, as you go through your daily life in a world full of potential subject matter-is an integral part of your work as a writer. We all carry on some kind of conversation with ourselves, and with the people we know, about the culture we live in. As writers, however, our task is to self-consciously translate that private conversation into a public one that connects with readers. In this course I ask you to address two questions that bear on this translation. One is historical: what has been said in the cultural conversation before you came to it? To find your place in the conversation (just as you would have to do if you joined a roomful of people talking) you will need to grapple with cultural issues and debates that go back half a century-debates about the nature of art and criticism, technology and mass media, high culture versus mass culture, art and politics, social groups and cultural difference. The second question is personal: what experiences, ideas, emotions, and prejudices do you bring to the conversation? While conventional news writers are simply expected to put their own attitudes aside, cultural journalists must be conscious of their standpoint and its impact on their observation and judgment. Your credibility and the power of your literary voice depend a good deal on your ability to develop this capacity for self-reflection. Open to CRC students only.

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WRRI - CRC

F, 9am-2pm

Mark Schone

WRRI - CRC

Instructor: Mark Schone

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.007

Days: F, 9am-2pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

This is the introductory reporting, research and journalistic writing course for CRC students, teaching cultural journalists the skills and conventions of news and feature reporting for print and multimedia. Students receive short- and long-form reporting assignments with intensive rewriting, and basic training in radio production. Open to CRC students only.

This course teaches cultural journalists the essentials of news reporting: the skills andconventions of journalistic practice across media platforms. Whetheryour reported work is published, posted or broadcast, you’ll need to work from the same ground rules as your editors, producers, sources and readers, and to master a repertoire ofbasic forms.

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Critical Profile

Monday, 1:30pm-5:10pm

Ruth Franklin

Critical Profile

Instructor: Ruth Franklin

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.008

Days: Monday, 1:30pm-5:10pm

Room: 7th Floor Library

» Syllabus (PDF)

 

In this course, we’ll tackle the challenges of producing successful profiles, with an 
emphasis on practical solutions to frequently encountered problems. Topics will
include composing a seductive lede, translating jargon and technical arcana for 
lay readers, wresting vivid scenes from dull subjects, and the ethics of handling 
sources. We’ll study how various journalists, writing about figures in a broad range 
of fields, from politics and finance to scholarship and the arts, have negotiated the 
profile’s challenges. We’ll read pieces by the genre’s most talented practitioners and 
meet some of those journalists in class. Along the way, students will acquire a sense 
of the idea profile’s historical trajectory, from its antecedents among New York 
intellectuals in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s and the New Journalism of the 1960s 
to its flowering in recent decades, in magazines like Lingua Franca, The New York 
Times Magazine, Vanity Fair, and The New Yorker.

In this course, we’ll tackle the challenges of producing successful profiles, with an emphasis on practical solutions to frequently encountered problems. Topics will include composing a seductive lede, translating jargon and technical arcana for lay readers, wresting vivid scenes from dull subjects, and the ethics of handling sources. We’ll study how various journalists, writing about figures in a broad range of fields, from politics and finance to scholarship and the arts, have negotiated the profile’s challenges. We’ll read pieces by the genre’s most talented practitioners and meet some of those journalists in class. Along the way, students will acquire a sense of the idea profile’s historical trajectory, from its antecedents among New York intellectuals in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s and the New Journalism of the 1960s to its flowering in recent decades, in magazines like Lingua Franca, The New York Times Magazine, Vanity Fair, and The New Yorker.

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Cataclysm and Commitment

Wednesday, 9:00am-1:00pm

TBA

Cataclysm and Commitment

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1281.001

Days: Wednesday, 9:00am-1:00pm

Room: 7th Floor Library

» Syllabus (PDF)

TBA

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Journalism and Politics of the 60's

Friday, 10:00am-12:00pm

TBA

Journalism and Politics of the 60's

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1281.003

Days: Friday, 10:00am-12:00pm

Room: 657

Coming soon

In this course, we’ll tackle the challenges of producing successful profiles, with an 
emphasis on practical solutions to frequently encountered problems. Topics will
include composing a seductive lede, translating jargon and technical arcana for 
lay readers, wresting vivid scenes from dull subjects, and the ethics of handling 
sources. We’ll study how various journalists, writing about figures in a broad range 
of fields, from politics and finance to scholarship and the arts, have negotiated the 
profile’s challenges. We’ll read pieces by the genre’s most talented practitioners and 
meet some of those journalists in class. Along the way, students will acquire a sense 
of the idea profile’s historical trajectory, from its antecedents among New York 
intellectuals in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s and the New Journalism of the 1960s 
to its flowering in recent decades, in magazines like Lingua Franca, The New York 
Times Magazine, Vanity Fair, and The New Yorker

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» Global and Joint Program Studies

WRRI - GloJo

Friday, 10am-1:40pm

Barbara Borst

WRRI - GloJo

Instructor: Barbara Borst

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.008

Days: Friday, 10am-1:40pm

Room: 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course will teach you the fundamentals of news reporting and writing. You will learn to write clearly and concisely, and to produce news stories on deadline. These are skills you will need to master no matter what medium you work in-newspapers, websites, magazines, TV or radio-and whether you aspire to report on local, national or international topics. During this first half of a two-semester course, we will focus on news and beat reporting because they are the backbone of journalism. We will learn by doing, with reporting and writing assignments inside and outside class. Our lab will be New York City, which is rich in stories that can challenge the most seasoned reporters. We will begin by learning the basics of news reporting: story organization, interview techniques, developing sources, research methods, and grammar and style. Through classroom discussions, field trips and guest speakers, we will explore journalistic practices and how they are changing.

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WRRI - GloJo

Thursday, 10am-1:40pm

Barbara Borst

WRRI - GloJo

Instructor: Barbara Borst

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.002

Days: Thursday, 10am-1:40pm

Room: 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course will teach you the fundamentals of news reporting and writing. You will learn to write clearly and concisely, and to produce news stories on deadline. These are skills you will need to master no matter what medium you work in-newspapers, websites, magazines, TV or radio-and whether you aspire to report on local, national or international topics. During this first half of a two-semester course, we will focus on news and beat reporting because they are the backbone of journalism. We will learn by doing, with reporting and writing assignments inside and outside class. Our lab will be New York City, which is rich in stories that can challenge the most seasoned reporters. We will begin by learning the basics of news reporting: story organization, interview techniques, developing sources, research methods, and grammar and style. Through classroom discussions, field trips and guest speakers, we will explore journalistic practices and how they are changing.

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WRRII - GloJo

Wednesday, 1:15pm-4:15pm

Brooke Kroeger

WRRII - GloJo

Instructor: Brooke Kroeger

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1022.001

Days: Wednesday, 1:15pm-4:15pm

Room: 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

The staff foreign correspondent, once the elite of the newspaper profession, may be a creature on the verge of extinction. But it means that the opportunities to become a foreign journalist by going freelance are greater than ever. This course will give you the tools you need to get the facts in a foreign country and turn them into compelling stories for a domestic audience.

 

We will cover basics like making contacts, identifying reliable sources, and ensuring personal security; look at how to deal with cultural differences like norms of truth and social roles; study how the relationships between officialdom, business, and the media abroad differ from those in the US; learn how to navigate government bodies, NGOs, and international corporations and organizations; discuss the ethics of reporting abroad and the impacts it can have on you, your subjects and your audience; and explore the different skills needed for political, business, social, and war reporting. We’ll read some of the finest foreign journalism together, and the practical assignments will work on honing the reporting and, above all, the writing that will be essential whether you work for print, television, radio or the web, in a local, national or foreign beat.

 

But wait, you say: isn’t there a little problem here? How can we practice foreign reporting while stuck in New York City? Answer: you’ll report on New York as if you were a correspondent from a foreign country. If that sounds silly, it isn’t. This city is home to Byzantine politics, major industries, vibrant culture, a diverse population, and tough social problems, just like the best foreign assignments. It fascinates the world, and people everywhere know something about it, yet few understand its complexities—again, like the best foreign beats. It overloads you with information to be judged, sifted and made sense of. Reporting on New York for outsiders will serve as superb training for reporting distant places to a home audience.

 

This course will force you to set aside assumptions about what both you and your readers know; make you see New York with fresh eyes and report it from a cross-cultural perspective; and encourage you to flex your writing muscles in a wide range of styles.

 

Open to GloJo students only.

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» Literary Reportage

Literature in a Hurry - WRRI: LitRep

Tuesday, 9:30am-12:30pm

Brooke Kroeger

Literature in a Hurry - WRRI: LitRep

Instructor: Brooke Kroeger

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.008

Days: Tuesday, 9:30am-12:30pm

Room: 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

New description to come

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How Books are Built: The Basics of NonFiction Narrative

T, 3:30-7pm

Michael Norman

How Books are Built: The Basics of NonFiction Narrative

Instructor: Michael Norman

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1050.001

Days: T, 3:30-7pm

Room: 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

This is a lively seminar about the most difficult aspect of book writing: How to structure a narrative. Through careful reading and exercises, we will attempt to discover how fine non-fiction books are made. We will read five book-length narratives (among them Praying for Sheetrock by Melissa Faye Greene, and The Duke of Deception by Geoff Wolf) then take those books apart, chapter by chapter, to discover what material the writer collected, how and why the writer organized that material and, finally, what structure the writer used to create a compelling narrative that attempts to hold the reader from first page to last. Seminar members, working in teams with protocols supplied by the instructor, will "present" the books for analysis and lead a discussion of them.

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Introduction to LitRep

Thursday, 2:00pm-5:00pm

Robert S. Boynton

Introduction to LitRep

Instructor: Robert S. Boynton

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.010

Days: Thursday, 2:00pm-5:00pm

Room: Room 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

The goal of this course is to help you create a distinctive body of work and, eventually, a capstone piece of literary reportage. It has three basic components. First, it will guide you through the research, reporting and thinking to refine and focus the project you will begin in Portfolio I. Second, it will introduce you to some of the authors, editors and publications of the genre. Third, it will familiarize you with some of the journalistic strategies you will use in your own work.

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Portfolio

Monday, 10:00am-1:00pm

Katie Roiphe

Portfolio

Instructor: Katie Roiphe

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.001

Days: Monday, 10:00am-1:00pm

Room: Library

» Syllabus (PDF)

The NYU Portfolio Program is designed to educate journalists in a way that is both conservative and revolutionary: Conservative in that it emphasizes knowledge of various journalistic traditions, basic literary skills, and practical outcomes (aka getting published) and revolutionary in that we are going to pursue these goals without primary emphasis on the "boot-camp" model ("skills" courses, "content" courses, etc.) that has dominated journalism education for the last half century. By invitation, we encourage and enable a select group of students to use their NYU Journalism Department experience to develop a coherent, sophisticated body of work.

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» Magazine Writing

Law & Mass Communication

Monday, 5:00pm-7:30pm

TBA

Law & Mass Communication

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 0011.001

Days: Monday, 5:00pm-7:30pm

Room: 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course is designed to acquaint students with the basic protections and restrictions of the law as they apply to the media, as well as the ethical problems and dilemmas journalists face. First Amendment rights and legal and ethical responsibilities and limitations will be examined and discussed. The course will look at these questions from five viewpoints: from (i) the practical view of a journalist doing his job with (ii) heavy consideration of ethical imperatives, and (iii) from a legal prospective, all the while (iv) considering the rules in a public policy context -- are they fair and appropriate in our society? -- while (v) noting the historical context in which they arise. Significant court cases and fundamental legal rules as well as past ethical scandals and issues will be explored in the context of political and historical realities, and in terms of journalistic standards and practices; contemporary media law issues and ethical problems and guidelines will also be focused on. Among the basic First Amendment issues which will be examined are libel, invasion of privacy, prior restraints, newsgathering and newsgathering torts, and the reporter's privilege; some of the ethical issues to be explored include objectivity in reporting, bias and transparency, conflicts of interest, and fair dealings with subjects, sources and advertisers.

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WRRI - Magazine

R, 10am-3:50pm

Meryl Gordon

WRRI - Magazine

Instructor: Meryl Gordon

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.011

Days: R, 10am-3:50pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

This is a professional course, concentrating on the basics of the craft of journalism — coming up with an idea, getting it approved, reporting the facts, organizing the material and writing the story. Students will spend a lot of time looking for story ideas, and pitching them — a critical part of the real-world newsroom experience. Perhaps the biggest emphasis of the class will be on the most important part of journalism: gathering the facts. Students will have many reporting exercises during in-class drill sessions, but will also do a great deal of "live" street reporting. We will rely much more on primary sources — original documents, and especially what people tell us — rather than secondary sources that are better suited for the background that sends us to primary sources.

In drills and in the stories produced outside of class, students will learn the classic styles of organizing and writing, and will begin learning what works best for them on different types of stories. We'll read and analyze many examples of the day's news, looking at what works, what doesn't and why. We'll look at what gets covered, what doesn't, and the impact of both. The ethics of journalism will be a constant undercurrent for all our work and discussions.

In addition to exercises produced during drill sessions, students will do a number of street-reporting assignments. Possible story ideas might cover some aspect of a city agency, the courts, police, the arts, culture, business and sports. The story assignments are not merely drills; goal is to produce stories that can be published. (new paragraph)This class aims to lay the foundation for a career in journalism, extremely challenging but extremely stimulating, with the focus always on best practices for the communications professional in the 21st century.

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» News and Documentary

Press Ethics

Monday, 12:30pm-3:00pm

Jane Stone

Press Ethics

Instructor: Jane Stone

Course ID: JOUR-GA 0012.002

Days: Monday, 12:30pm-3:00pm

Room: 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course offers through the case method a critical examination of current and recurring ethical and legal issues in journalism. Areas covered include reporting practices, roles of editors and executives, conflict of interest, sources, defamation and privacy, criminal justice and national security.

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TV Reporting I

Tuesday, 1:00pm-5:00pm

Marcia Rock

TV Reporting I

Instructor: Marcia Rock

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1040.001

Days: Tuesday, 1:00pm-5:00pm

Room: 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

This beginning course introduces students to field reporting. Students learn to develop story ideas, write to picture, structure a story and conduct interviews and shoot and edit. Beat assignments cover a variety of topics in the neighborhoods of New York. As the course develops, detailed script analysis is combined with in-depth discussions of the completed pieces. Students work in teams of 2-3. They use small DV cameras, linear and non-linear editing systems.

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WRRI - NewsDoc

Wednesday, 10am-3:50pm

Cora Daniels

WRRI - NewsDoc

Instructor: Cora Daniels

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.009

Days: Wednesday, 10am-3:50pm

Room: 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

The best journalism flows from logical thinking, solid research, and comprehensive journalism. Through short deadline pieces and longer writing assignments this class will simulate a newsroom and teach you how to think like a journalist. New York City will be your reporting lab and you will be sent out into the city hunting for stories from day one. While the primary focus of this class is print, the skills will give you a strong journalism foundation that can be used in any media.

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Advanced TV Reporting

Wednesday, 4:00pm-8:00pm

Marcia Rock

Advanced TV Reporting

Instructor: Marcia Rock

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1175.001

Days: Wednesday, 4:00pm-8:00pm

Room: 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

We have several objectives in this class this semester. One is to finish your long piece. The other is to produce a short piece for our Election Special. You will work in groups of 2 for the election stories and then report live from various locations on election night as a follow-up to your reports. We will discuss this in class tonight and you will pitch stories on 9/21. This is very much a workshop class. You will present your work during the various stages of production—developing your story, reviewing your raw tapes, scripts and rough-cuts during class. Each of you will develop a schedule with deadlines for both stories and submit this by 9/28. During class, I will also bring in tapes to discuss that will stimulate discussion of form and content. Classes may run past 8:00 PM as we get more involved in story development so please don't schedule yourself too tightly on Wednesdays. Before you edit your election pieces, I will conduct an AVID session to give you some shortcuts. If you want to work on FCP, you have access to the 504 A computers, but you will compete with all the other students for time on those machines. Our final class is Dec 14. From past experience, that is not enough time to view all projects so I suggest we also meet on the 15th. We can meet in the afternoon as well since formal classes are over on the 14th. If you need the time, we could also have our last meeting on 12/19. Please do not schedule airline tickets before then. We will also pick a date in early February for your film festival screening. We normally have it on a Saturday, be we could try for a Friday. Please choose from Jan 28 or Feb 4. Parents and friends, of course, are invited.

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» Reporting the Nation

WRRI - RTN/RNY

M, 11am-4:50pm

Yvonne Latty

WRRI - RTN/RNY

Instructor: Yvonne Latty

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.005

Days: M, 11am-4:50pm

Room: 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

This class is your newsroom. You will learn to research, pitch story ideas, find the right angles, hit the streets and write it up on deadline. You will use this nation, rich with culture, diversity, money and power, to learn and practice your skills. Journalism is about people, their stories, the government and services that enable them to live their lives. This class is about finding your voice and embracing your beat with passion, respect and understanding. This is a multimedia class. In the course of our year together you will learn to shoot and edit video, discover the magic of audio and create compelling slideshows, all for the web and for our website, "NYC Pavement Pieces." But remember, the words always come first.

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Investigative Reporting

Tuesday, 6:20pm-10pm

Joe Calderone

Investigative Reporting

Instructor: Joe Calderone

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.005

Days: Tuesday, 6:20pm-10pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course seeks students interested in learning the skills necessary to produce exclusive, hard-edged, ground-breaking reporting, combining human sources with original, document-based research. Bloggers, Tweeters, aspiring TV talking heads and print reporters will learn how to cut through the noise and produce reporting that stands out, makes a difference.and gives them an edge in a crowded field.

The emphasis is on New York City-based fieldwork resulting in a capstone, semester-long investigative project of your choosing that is worthy of publication. You will learn how to develop ideas for a project, find and cultivate sources, pitch and write the story in a clear, compelling and fair fashion while adhering to the highest standards of accuracy and objectivity. You will see how to mine the records of courthouses, police agencies, property clerks, health agencies, City Hall, campaign finance, tax authorities and other municipal, nonprofit and law-enforcement offices for exclusive material. Your aim will be to produce a story that sheds a light on a little-known or hidden topic with important implications for the public and readers.

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» Science, Health and Environmental Reporting

Science Literacy & Numeracy

M, 12-3pm

Charles Seife

Science Literacy & Numeracy

Instructor: Charles Seife

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1018.001

Days: M, 12-3pm

Room: 659

» Syllabus (PDF)

Science Literacy and Numeracy aims to give students a historical and literary context for science journalism, and will also introduce them to crucial concepts in statistics, probability and data analysis. The course will be rigorous, with an extensive reading list tracing the development of science journalism and examining the science journalist's role in society. There will also be heavy usage of problem sets and writing assignments aimed at showing students how to recognize "good science" and it's opposite. The course begins with a discussion of the conflict between scientists and non-scientists, and how science journalists are a bridge between the two cultures. Then students explore how society's way of understanding the natural world has changed over the centuries, the modern methods and philosophies of the practice of science, and some issues that affect scientists and scientific journalists that are not dreamt of in those philosophies. A mini-course in numeracy also arms students with the weapons to understand and dissect scientific studies. Using that knowledge, the class then returns to the scientific world to look at how science journalists have plied their craft, and at the pressures they face that make it hard for them to be solid bridges between scientists and non-scientists.

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WRRI - SHERP

T, 920am-3:20pm

Michael Balter

WRRI - SHERP

Instructor: Michael Balter

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.006

Days: T, 920am-3:20pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

The aim of this course is to develop and enhance your journalistic talents through intensive use of the
tools of the trade. We will specialize in science, health and environment writing and reporting, although
the outlook and skills you will acquire will serve you on any of journalism’s numerous news beats.

You will learn to write and report compelling news stories and news features, and greatly improve your
already existing skills. These will include basic elements of journalism such as how to find story leads,
track down information sources, get and conduct interviews, write with clarity, accuracy and style, and
make the most of the editing process. You will learn to write for the print and electronic media, practice
the art of blogging, and have a brief introduction to podcasting. You will also receive a basic introduction
to shooting and editing video in a series of morning and evening workshops.

In class, there will be a strong focus on discussion, newsroom-style give-and-take, and story pitches,
as well as in-class exercises, group edit sessions and some guest speakers. This is a workshop, so class
attendance is MANDATORY. You will put your new skills into practice with regular assignments. And
some of your best work, honed by group and one-on-one editing sessions, will be considered for the
SHERP webzine, Scienceline.

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Current Topics in SHERP

Thursday, 10am-4:30pm

Dan Fagin

Current Topics in SHERP

Instructor: Dan Fagin

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1017.001

Days: Thursday, 10am-4:30pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

Current Topics in Science, Health and Environmental Journalism

Current Topics in Science, Health and Environmental Journalism introduces students to the world of science journalism by looking at scientific topics that are at the cutting-edge of current research and also have profound implications for the way we live. In other words, they are the raw material for great journalism. As students immerse themselves in some challenging areas of current science, they will read the work of highly accomplished researchers and journalists, and will also hear from them directly in class. The goal throughout is be to understand and adopt the processes that the best science journalists use when they cover controversial science. You will learn how journalists interact with scientists, conduct research, organize information and write stories. Just as importantly, students also sharpen their analytical skills by writing almost every week for the SHERP webzine, Scienceline. Covering an assigned beat, students follow the peer-reviewed journals and other sources to stay on top of the news as it happens.

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Medical Writing

W, 12:30pm-3:30pm

Ivan Oransky, MD

Medical Writing

Instructor: Ivan Oransky, MD

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1188.001

Days: W, 12:30pm-3:30pm

Room: Room 654

Medical Reporting, taught by Professor Ivan Oransky.

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Science Reporting

Tuesday, 5:00pm-8:00pm

John Rennie

Science Reporting

Instructor: John Rennie

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1180.001

Days: Tuesday, 5:00pm-8:00pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

This advanced SHERP class is intended to give a realistic preview of life as a working science journalist. We will explore the process step by step, from finding a story idea to pitching it to surviving the editing process to making sure the final product is accurate, clear and compelling. We will also look at science journalism from the editor's point of view. Open to third semester SHERP students only.

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» Studio 20

Press Ethics: Digital Thinking

Monday, 2:00pm-6:00pm

Jay Rosen

Press Ethics: Digital Thinking

Instructor: Jay Rosen

Course ID: JOUR-GA 0012.003

Days: Monday, 2:00pm-6:00pm

Room: 652

In this course we will examine what makes journalism different now that it runs on a digital platform. Readings and discussion will focus on making sense of the large shifts that accompany the move to digital production and distribution in professional journalism, including the "always on" web, the lower barriers to entry, the rise of social media and "the people formerly known as the audience," the ease of production using digital tools, the "unbundling" of news packages that were well adapted to prior platforms, the loss of monopoly status among news organizations, and the re-voicing of journalism in a more interactive environment for news. By comparing press ethics under the "old" system and the new codes that have emerged in the digital era, students will be able to hone in on what is different for professional journalists today, which is knowledge they will need for the remainder of the Studio 20 program.

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Studio 1

Tuesday, 1:30pm-6:30pm

TBA

Studio 1

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.009

Days: Tuesday, 1:30pm-6:30pm

Room: 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course will examine the phenomenon of innovation, examining current disruptions in news media, how the industry's failure to innovate in a timely fashion is radically reshaping it, and why innovation is more necessary now than ever. We will look at great journalistic innovators throughout history, the causes and effects of major journalistic innovations -- including innovations in form, style, and content -- and the industry's response to new and disruptive technologies through the years. We will examine what new media are doing to reinvent journalism in the age of the Web and social media.

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WRRI - Studio20

Wednesday, 4:00pm-9:50pm

TBA

WRRI - Studio20

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1021.004

Days: Wednesday, 4:00pm-9:50pm

Room: 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

See syllabus for details.

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Studio 3

Tuesday, 2:30pm-7:00pm

Jay Rosen

Studio 3

Instructor: Jay Rosen

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.013

Days: Tuesday, 2:30pm-7:00pm

Room: 655

See instructor for details.

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» Graduate Electives

Front Of The Book

Monday, 6:20pm-10:00pm

Nick Marino

Front Of The Book

Instructor: Nick Marino

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1231.005

Days: Monday, 6:20pm-10:00pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

 

Course description: The front-of-book is the fast-paced, voice-driven section every magazine uses to establish its personality and reel in readers. It's a lively mix of topics and storyforms that, when done right, hangs together like a magazine unto itself. By discussing both writing and editing for the front-of-book, this class will give students a 360-degree perspective on assigning, pacing, crafting and polishing the opening pages of any magazine.

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Personal Essay

M, 9:30am-1:10pm

Perri Klass

Personal Essay

Instructor: Perri Klass

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.004

Days: M, 9:30am-1:10pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

The Persuasive Essay

Sometimes you have a hunch that something’s not right with the world, or that a new argument needs to be made. In this class, you’ll start with a kernel of insight and develop it into an essay-length argument. You’ll figure out what point you want to make and read the key articles or books on that subject, so that you know what the big debates are and won’t repeat work done elsewhere. You’ll do interviews and find new data. Maybe you’ll look for characters whose stories help you make your case. Or maybe you’ll want to write about yourself—the experiences that piqued your interest, what happened when you went out to report the story--but though you'll be free to write in the first person to some extent, this will not be a class in writing personal essays or memoirs. In this class, you'll learn how to use evidence, observation, interviews, and analysis to persuade your reader, in addition to personal testimony (if you use that at all).

There will be weekly readings, as well as several short exercises in topical opinion-writing. In these blog-post-length pieces, you’ll practice techniques discussed or illustrated in the readings (the counterintuitive argument, the argument from example or representative anecdote, the argument that says that some old way of thinking should revived, and so on). You’ll riff off the news even as you develop the ideas that will shape your end-of-term essay. These exercises will help you digest the material you’re gathering and figure out its relevance to current events. Each short piece will be evaluated for originality, factual accuracy, and persuasiveness, as will the longer one.

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The Editor's Vision

M, 1:00pm-4:40pm

Alexis Gelber

The Editor's Vision

Instructor: Alexis Gelber

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1019.001

Days: M, 1:00pm-4:40pm

Room: 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

The class will examine how editors imprint their own sensibility on a magazine, woo an audience and develop a unique identity for their publication. Coming up with the right mix of articles is a constant challenge; editors are always trying to re-invent the formula as well as struggling to find interesting ways to package service pieces or celebrity profiles, or come up with catchy covers and headlines to boost newsstand circulation.

New magazines evolve either from one person's passionate idea (Esquire and its founder Arnold Gingrich, Tina Brown and the Daily Beast) or are launched by corporate magazine development departments (Oprah, Real Simple, Lucky). This class will examine the history and evolution of magazines, from the hits and misses (Portfolio, Domino) of recent years to a look back at the past. Weekly classes will focus on different aspects of magazine-making, and leading editors, art directors and photo editors will visit as guest speakers to provide their expert insights.

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Magazine Multimedia

Tuesday, 6:30pm - 10:00pm

TBA

Magazine Multimedia

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.002

Days: Tuesday, 6:30pm - 10:00pm

Room: Room 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

While the rows of glossy magazines on a newsstand grab our attention, magazine reporting and writing exists on a variety of platforms: Tweets, online posts, blogs and features, listicles, and  multimedia, from slideshows to videos. Magazine publishing is a two-way street where the “book” needs to reach out to readers by marketing the piece on social media, encouraging feedback and sharing, and keeping track of feedback.

Taught in conjunction with “Writing Reporting Workshop I,” the “Digital Magazine” will teach students how practice magazine journalism on various platforms.  Half the semester will be devoted to multimedia: conceptualizing, shooting and producing photos, slideshows and video.  The other half of the semester will focus on digital skills such as using social media for research and reporting as well as branding, data visualization and analytics.

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Magazine Multimedia

Tuesday, 6:30pm - 10:00pm

TBA

Magazine Multimedia

Instructor: TBA

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.016

Days: Tuesday, 6:30pm - 10:00pm

Room: Room 653

» Syllabus (PDF)

While the rows of glossy magazines on a newsstand grab our attention, magazine reporting and writing exists on a variety of platforms: Tweets, online posts, blogs and features, listicles, and  multimedia, from slideshows to videos. Magazine publishing is a two-way street where the “book” needs to reach out to readers by marketing the piece on social media, encouraging feedback and sharing, and keeping track of feedback.

 

Taught in conjunction with “Writing Reporting Workshop I,” the “Digital Magazine” will teach students how practice magazine journalism on various platforms.  Half the semester will be devoted to multimedia: conceptualizing, shooting and producing photos, slideshows and video.  The other half of the semester will focus on digital skills such as using social media for research and reporting as well as branding, data visualization and analytics.

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The Art of Argument and Polemic

Tuesday, 9:45am-12:45pm

Katie Roiphe

The Art of Argument and Polemic

Instructor: Katie Roiphe

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.011

Days: Tuesday, 9:45am-12:45pm

Room: Library

Coming soon

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Introduction to LitRep

Tuesday, 1:00pm-4:00pm

Robert S. Boynton

Introduction to LitRep

Instructor: Robert S. Boynton

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.012

Days: Tuesday, 1:00pm-4:00pm

Room: 7th Floor Library

» Syllabus (PDF)

What is “literary reportage”? Sometimes called “literary journalism,” “narrative nonfiction” or the “literature of fact,” it might best be thought of as a way of weaving characters, reporting, research and stories together in order to create something that appeals to the general reader. In my opinion, literary reportage is less a subject to be studied than it is a collection of practices, insights, techniques, guidelines and formulas to help a writer explore the subjects he/she cares about, and share that passion with an audience in the most aesthetically pleasing way possible. Literary reportage is valuable to the extent that you can use it, and it is in this spirit that this course operates.


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Reporting the Arts

Wednesday, 6:20pm-10:00pm

Rob Brunner

Reporting the Arts

Instructor: Rob Brunner

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1231.003

Days: Wednesday, 6:20pm-10:00pm

Room: 652

» Syllabus (PDF)

Prof. Rob Brunner

In this course, you’ll develop your voice and your reportorial skills, enhance your understanding of the way magazines and websites operate, and prepare for a career in an industry that has changed even since you started reading this paragraph.

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Newest New Yorkers

Wednesday, 9:30am-12:00pm

Suketu Mehta

Newest New Yorkers

Instructor: Suketu Mehta

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1023.001

Days: Wednesday, 9:30am-12:00pm

Room: 654

» Syllabus (PDF)

New York is the biggest, fastest, richest city in America. It holds more people than Los Angeles, Chicago, and Philadelphia - combined. There are eight million stories in the naked city, soon to be nine million (The New York metropolitan area has 22 million, or one out of every fourteen Americans). They make its 321 miles the most densely populated place in North America. As Le Corbusier observed, "a considerable part of New York is nothing more than a provisional city, a city which will be replaced by another city." What has replaced the well-known and beloved New York of the twentieth century? What is the inner life of the Salvadoran busboy, the Pakistani cabbie, the Senegalese street vendor, the Mexican cleaning lady? What about the Nigerian investment banker, the Iranian real-estate developer, the French cellist, already far richer than most of their neighbors? Who are all these people who come into Manhattan and clean our tables and sew our clothes; own our banks and are automatically seated at the best tables in the best restaurants; and where do they go at the end of the day? How do they fall in love, raise their children, pay the rent?

Two-thirds of New Yorkers today are immigrants or their children, and immigration is the most important domestic issue in America today. This course will open students' eyes to the splendid feast of the city's immigrant neighborhoods, explore the complex issues involved in immigration and city life, and help them write about it in a way that does justice to the human beings behind the numbers.

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Advanced Multimedia

Wednesday, 4:30pm-8:30pm

Jason Samuels

Advanced Multimedia

Instructor: Jason Samuels

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.014

Days: Wednesday, 4:30pm-8:30pm

Room: 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

Today’s digital journalists are tasked with employing new storytelling tools.

This advanced multimedia journalism course will push students, working individually or in teams, to produce innovative and compelling work that will engage news consumers on the web.

In this course students will spend their fall semester producing one long-form multimedia project of their choosing. Completed projects will be a carefully assembled amalgamation of text, audio, video, photos, interactive maps and graphics.   

The objective of the course is to have students produce a heavily reported, thoroughly researched and beautifully crafted piece of digital journalism – the equivalent of an academic senior honors thesis.

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Reporting the Arts: The Pop Culture Beat

W, 6:20pm-10:00pm

Jeff Giles

Reporting the Arts: The Pop Culture Beat

Instructor: Jeff Giles

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1231.006

Days: W, 6:20pm-10:00pm

Room: 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

This course will teach you how to write and report about the arts critically, passionately, and distinctively at a time when there are more platforms than ever available to journalists, but fame is a debased commodity and much of our culture is punch-drunk with its own silliness. We'll dissect great arts journalism old and new, long and short, in print and online. And we’ll also study bad articles that people were paid thousands of dollars to write to see what they reveal about how difficult it is to get access to a subject, how important it is have an angle you believe in, and how vital it is to develop your voice as a writer. We’ll discuss how to pitch stories, how to negotiate with publicists, how to work with editors, and how to build a career. Guest speakers will include prominent writers and editors, as well as publicists and executives who can give us a sense of what entertainment writers look like from the other side of the fence. Assignments will include a review, a Q+A, a handful of blog posts, and, as a final project, a 3,000-word feature story.

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Data Journalism

Thursday, 6:30pm-10pm

Amanda Cox

Data Journalism

Instructor: Amanda Cox

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1070.002

Days: Thursday, 6:30pm-10pm

Room: Room 652

 

In this class, students will learn to collect, analyze and present data in an immersive, hands-on course from members of the New York Times's graphics department.
A lengthy portion of each class is devoted to real-life examples, emphasizing the skills newsrooms want. How can web scripting help a reporter track down runners who may have witnessed explosions in the Boston Marathon bombings? How can a map illustrate the challenges in developing gun policy? Why is data cleaning required to uncover the influence of money in visits to the White House? More than ever, these new ways of telling stories require data skills.
While the course's main goal is journalistic, not technical, students will write and program web pages in HTML, CSS and Javascript; use Git to share and reuse code; merge, sort, filter and aggregate data sets in Excel and R; and make charts to show changes over time and maps to visualize spatial relationships. In the process, students will learn how to use data to strengthen and improve their reporting process.
Fluency with data and the ability to ask and answer questions from structured information sources can help any journalist, whether she's a radio producer, magazine writer or digital producer. In past course evaluations, 41 of 43 students — with a wide variety of interests and technical backgrounds — have said they would recommend the class to a friend. 

 

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Data Journalism

Thursday, 6:30pm-10pm

Kevin Quealy

Data Journalism

Instructor: Kevin Quealy

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1070.001

Days: Thursday, 6:30pm-10pm

Room: Room 653

In this class, students will learn to collect, analyze and present data in an immersive, hands-on course from members of the New York Times's graphics department. A lengthy portion of each class is devoted to real-life examples, emphasizing the skills newsrooms want. How can web scripting help a reporter track down runners who may have witnessed explosions in the Boston Marathon bombings? How can a map illustrate the challenges in developing gun policy? Why is data cleaning required to uncover the influence of money in visits to the White House? More than ever, these new ways of telling stories require data skills.

While the course's main goal is journalistic, not technical, students will write and program web pages in HTML, CSS and Javascript; use Git to share and reuse code; merge, sort, filter and aggregate data sets in Excel and R; and make charts to show changes over time and maps to visualize spatial relationships. In the process, students will learn how to use data to strengthen and improve their reporting process.

Fluency with data and the ability to ask and answer questions from structured information sources can help any journalist, whether she's a radio producer, magazine writer or digital producer. In past course evaluations, 41 of 43 students — with a wide variety of interests and technical backgrounds — have said they would recommend the class to a friend. 

SHERP and Studio 20 Priority

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Photojournalism

Thursday, 10:00am-1:40pm

Lori Grinker

Photojournalism

Instructor: Lori Grinker

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.015

Days: Thursday, 10:00am-1:40pm

Room: 655

» Syllabus (PDF)

 

This course is about the development of knowledge through photography. As the lines begin to blur 
between documentary photography, photojournalism, vernacular photographs and fine art, how can a 
personal photographic project fit in with new storytelling possibilities such as multimedia platforms, 
smart camera documentation, audio slideshows, tablet e-readers, while addressing social issues in 
depth? Some documentary photographers approach a subject with a clear agenda for prescriptive 
change, some come with a direction, technique, or a subject area, some come seeking answers, often 
in the form of stories or essays, and others seek to portray a psychological reality or state of mind. In 
many cases, a new understanding of the world, or at least one aspect of the world, is achieved. 
Besides imparting an understanding of this process, this course poses the question: How will you 
document the social, political, economic, and cultural issues of today and cultivate a narrative with 
still images? 
 
How will you document a neighborhood of your city; how will you interpret what you see when you 
look through your viewfinder? What knowledge emerges when you discuss and edit your work? And 
most basically, how do you begin? 

This course is about the development of knowledge through photography. As the lines begin to blur 

between documentary photography, photojournalism, vernacular photographs and fine art, how can a 

personal photographic project fit in with new storytelling possibilities such as multimedia platforms, 

smart camera documentation, audio slideshows, tablet e-readers, while addressing social issues in 

depth? Some documentary photographers approach a subject with a clear agenda for prescriptive 

change, some come with a direction, technique, or a subject area, some come seeking answers, often 

in the form of stories or essays, and others seek to portray a psychological reality or state of mind. In 

many cases, a new understanding of the world, or at least one aspect of the world, is achieved. 

Besides imparting an understanding of this process, this course poses the question: How will you 

document the social, political, economic, and cultural issues of today and cultivate a narrative with 

still images? 

 

How will you document a neighborhood of your city; how will you interpret what you see when you 

look through your viewfinder? What knowledge emerges when you discuss and edit your work? And 

most basically, how do you begin? 

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Investigative Reporting

R, 6:20-10pm

Mike McIntire

Investigative Reporting

Instructor: Mike McIntire

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.006

Days: R, 6:20-10pm

Room: 657

» Syllabus (PDF)

Your objective will be to master basic investigative tools and techniques, as well as how to apply them to everyday reporting and major enterprise pieces. We will explore how to take advantage of the two main sources of information documents and people and discuss when and how to use computer data to both enhance a story or provide the foundation for a major project. Throughout the course, the goal will be to constantly delve beneath the surface. Going deep is the essence of investigative reporting, which pulls together all publicly available information, as well as harder-to-find material, to present the fullest possible picture. Corporations and powerful individuals employ armies of PR experts, lawyers and lobbyists to ensure that only their version of reality prevails, and it is the lonely duty of journalists to dispel this fog of self-interest. At least as important as mastering the technical skills will be learning to think critically and skeptically. The relentlessly upbeat press release, the carefully worded SEC filing or the late-Friday-afternoon earnings statement each, as a matter of course, should be probed for accuracy and omission. What important development went unsaid? Did the company chairman really resign to "spend more time with his family"?

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Video Editing

R, 6:20-10pm

David Spungen

Video Editing

Instructor: David Spungen

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1182.007

Days: R, 6:20-10pm

Room: 750

» Syllabus (PDF)

The class will explore the compexity of long form visualization and the various structural options possible through editing. It will examine not longly how stories get told, but the different ways of telling them. 

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Storytellers

Thursday, 1:30pm-5:10pm

David Samuels

Storytellers

Instructor: David Samuels

Course ID: JOUR-GA 1231.001

Days: Thursday, 1:30pm-5:10pm

Room: 600

» Syllabus (PDF)

Great stories are shaped by talented, reckless, funny, arrogant and often misanthropic writers and reporters working at the height of their craft. In this class, we will study how world-shaking historical events and everyday experiences alike can be crafted into original journalistic narratives. We will concentrate on the writer's angle of approach to the subject - his or her ÒvoiceÓ - which is made more or less convincing through his or her control over language and the depth and range of his/her reporting. The first half of each class will consist of close readings of nonfiction narratives on Balkan wars, acid trips, nervous breakdowns, rock and roll concerts, a sarin gas attack in the Tokyo subways, a visit to the Iowa State Fair and assorted other subjects by some of my favorite journalists and novelists including Tom Wolfe, Joan Didion, David Foster Wallace, Denis Johnson, Rebecca West, Ryszard Kapucinski, Haruki Murakami, Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Joseph Mitchell. Each class will begin promptly at 12:30 PM and will be divided between an hour and thirty minute discussion of the assigned reading and an hour and fifteen minute discussion of your written work. Latecomers will be greeted with derision. We will break at 2 PM for afternoon snack. We will also enjoy visits from enlivening and informative guests from Harper's, The New Yorker and other high-class venues, who can answer any questions you might have about reporting and editing, and who will help you shape your ideas with an eye towards publishing your own work.

Magazine Priority

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