Curriculum

Course Title No. of Credits
Required Courses Introduction to Literary Reportage 4
Writing, Research, Reporting I 4
Introduction to Audio Reportage 4
Writing, Research, Reporting II (Journalism and Ethnography) 4
Portfolio 4
Master’s Project (4th Semester) 4
Apprenticeship 2
Elective Courses Open Electives 12

Total

38

Standard Literary Reportage course load

Fall

G54.1182.xx Introduction to Literary Reportage – 4 credits
G54.1021.xx Writing, Research and Reporting I – 4 credits
G54.1050.xx Introduction to Audio Reportage – 4 credits

Spring

G54.1023.xx WRRII – Ethnography for Journalists – 4 credits
G54.1182.xx Portfolio – 4 credits
Open Elective – 4 credits

Fall

Open Elective – 4 credits
Open Elective – 4 credits

Spring

G54.1299.xx  Masters’ Thesis – 4 credits
G54.1290.xx Apprenticeship – 2 credits

Required courses for the concentration:

  • G54.1182.xx Introduction to Literary Reportage
  • G54.1021.xx Writing, Research and Reporting I
  • G54.1050.xx Introduction to Audio Reportage
  • G54.1022.xx Writing Research and Reporting II (Ethnography)
  • G54.1182.xx Portfolio
  • G54.1290.xx Two-credit Apprenticeship
  • G54.1299.xx Four-credit Masters’ Project

Required Courses

G54.1021 and G54.1022 Writing, Research and Reporting I and II (4 credits each)

This one-semester course, a keystone of the Literary Reportage program, develops students as rigorous, curious observers of the world, arming them with the tools to become resourceful reporters and literary journalistic writers of precision, originality, and flair. We’ll focus on doing background/orbit research on a subject, coming up with varied and informative secondary subjects, covering the subject’s environment—and pay particular attention to the art of the interview. We’ll determine how to find a good story and tell it engagingly (addressing those crucial “what’s the point?” and “who cares?” questions), train in gathering information doggedly and thoughtfully, examine journalistic ethics, and generally learn the nuts and bolts of the profile form—all in an effort to most vividly and authentically bring our subjects to life on the page. Advanced students may substitute with a reporting elective, with permission of concentration director.

G54.1182.xx Introduction to Literary Reportage (4 credits)

We will read some significant works of literary reportage and discuss how you might use their strategies to become better writers. In addition, we will discuss the context in which these works were published, with special attention to the role particular editors and publications played. Finally, you will explore your projects-in-progress, making short presentations throughout the semester to spark a discussion and acquaint your colleagues with your ideas. The course concludes with a memo in which you evaluate your first semester, assesses the state of your thesis, looks forward to your second semester, summer and third semester, and set out a reading and research plan.

G54.1050.xx Introduction to Audio Reportage (4 credits)

Students will learn to produce documentary-style audio stories, as heard on Serial,This American Life, Planet Money, and Invisibilia. You will be encouraged to develop their personal style, while learning practical skills necessary for finding work in both radio and podcasting. After a quick introduction to audio equipment and a practice assignment, you’ll create two broadcast-worthy audio features.

G54.1182.xx Portfolio Workshop (4 credits)

A structured workshop during which Literary Reportage students will build a body of work.

G54.1299.xx Master’s Thesis (4 credits)

The degree will conclude with a substantial piece of literary reportage (6,000 to 10,000 words). Students will meet weekly to workshop and discuss their theses.

G54.1290.xx Apprenticeship (2 credits)

All students will be paired with a working writer/editor/audio producer whom they shall assist with roughly five hours of research and reporting per week. In exchange, the writer will meet with the student for a one hour weekly critique of his or her work.

Recent Electives

  • GA 1023.001 WRITING TROUBLE
  • GA 1082.006 THE REPORTED ESSAY
  • GA 1182.003 PROGRAMING FOR JOURNALISTS
  • GA 1182.004 INVESTIGATING RACIAL JUSTICE
  • GA 1182.007 INTERMEDIATE AUDIO REPORTAGE
  • GA 1182.011 THE ART OF THE POLEMIC
  • GA 1182.014 ADVANCED MULTIMEDIA
  • GA 1182.015 PHOTOJOURNALISM
  • GA 1231.001 COVERING THE FOOD WORLD
  • GA 1281.001 WRITING ABROAD
  • GA 2034.001 REPORTING THE ARTS
  • GA 2056.001 PERSONAL ESSAY
  • GA 2057.001 CRITICAL PROFILE
  • GA 331.003 INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING
  • GA 2081 THE JOURNALISM OF WAR, TERROR AND HUMAN RIGHTS
  • GA 1019.001 THE EDITOR’S VISION
  • GA 1023.002 JOURNALISM AS LITERATURE
  • GA 1182-002 REPORTING BELIEF
  • GA 1182-013 IDEAS THROUGH PEOPLE
  • GA 1182.004 POLITICAL CINEMA
  • GA 1281.001 WRITING SOCIAL COMMENTARY
  • GA 1231.001 A PERSON ON THE PAGE
  • GA 1182-006 NEW YORK STORIES
  • GA 1182.004 VARIETIES OF THE FIRST PERSON