NYU Arts & Science

 

Our Projects

Big Apple, Small Business (2016)
How much do you know about small business in NYC?

The New Americans (2015)

Going Green New York (2015)
New York University Journalism’s News & Documentary graduate students explore green initiatives and environmental problems affecting New York City.

Off Your Couch (2014)
Exercise & Design in 10 Chapters.

New Agenda New York (2013)
A student-produced site by NYU graduate journalism students.

Older In New York (2012)
New York is an old city growing older. As aging adults continue to make up a larger portion of the population, people are re-imagining and redefining what it means to grow old. They’re texting and sexting and learning new languages, but for a demographic that will soon outnumber school-age children, growing pains still make this city of opportunity tough to navigate.

Living the Line (2011)
Poverty in New York City.

Foster Care (2010)
Graduate students of New York University’s News and Documentary program spent part of a semester documenting the struggles and successes of people and families who endure life in the foster care system. On this website, you’ll find their stories, in print and video format.

NewDocs 2010 Midterm Elections Coverage
Coverage of the 2010 Midterm Elections by the students of News & Documentary and the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute. Special thanks to Joe Peyronnin and Adrian Mihai.

Women Out of Prison (2009)
NewsDoc students produced a multimedia website covering the issues women face when they are released from prison.

Inauguration 2009 Special
Newsdoc’s coverage of the 2009 presidential inauguration.

NYU Tonight Election 2008 Coverage

NYU Tonight’s three-hour coverage of the 2008 presidential election from 20 Cooper Square.

News and Documentary student reports on the 2008 Presidential Election (on Pavement Pieces)

“The Politics of Smear”
The Politics of Smear, a film about Islam and the election was produced by two News and Documentary graduates, Stuart Harmon and Megan Thompson. Check it out on the WGBH website!

NYU Tonight
Watch NYU Tonight—written, produced and broadcast by students of the Journalism Department. News from Washington Square to Washington D.C., Jerusalem, Baghdad, Kabul… wherever it’s happening. Plus Sports, Arts and Entertainment, and commentary.

NYU Journalism in Ghana
During the spring semester of 2006, the NYU in Ghana Program included four undergraduate journalism students. They teamed with sixteen Ghanaian University of Legon graduate students in the course Reporting II and produced several stories over the semester on topics that ranged from politics to health and education.

Check out writing, photos and video from the trip at Africa House.

Clooney on Murrow and Journalism, at NYU
Prof. Marcia Rock hosted an hour-long discussion on the Academy Award-nominated film on Edward R. Murrow, Good Night and Good Luck, with director, writer, and actor George Clooney, producer and co-writer Grant Heslov and the actor playing Murrow, David Strathairn.

The film is up for an Academy Award, as are the director (Clooney), the writers (Clooney and Grant Heslov), and the actor playing Murrow (Strathairn). Find out why they made the film and what they learned about the Fourth Estate and Edward R. Murrow’s legacy in this one hour discussion held at NYU on December 15, 2005, hosted by broadcast journalism professor Marcia Rock.

NYU Tonight’s 2005 Election Coverage
Students cover multiple campaigns, including the race for Mayor of New York City between incumbent Michael Bloomberg and Democratic challenger Fernando Ferrer.

Rostov-on-Don
In southern Russia the new entrepreneurs are enjoying their profits while others struggle to adapt to the new way of life. Produced as part of the Russian-American Journalism Institute—a joint program of Rostov State University, New York University and Ithaca College, 2003.

More stories and photos from Rostov are at RAJI: On Location in Rostov, Russia.

NYU Tonight’s 2004 Election Coverage
Students reported live from election parties around the city, with interviews of campaign volunteers in Ohio and reports from student journalists in Florida and Chicago. They covered immigrant groups around the city as well as stories on the key issues of the campaign, with live updates every ten minutes.

What We See: 9/11/02

Watch the events of September 11th 2002 through the eyes and lenses of NYU broadcast graduate students as they return to the stories they covered last year. See the students and their city a year later as they struggle to reflect on what they learned. See What We Saw and See What We See on Crosswalks, Ch 74 Nov 18, 7-8 pm and repeated on Tuesday, Nov 19, 11-12pm. This is the premiere of our relationship with Crosswalks. Each week either a produced program of NYU broadcast journalism students will be featured or a talk by a guest to the department.

Election 2002
NYU graduate and undergraduate broadcast students are teaming up to produce live coverage of Election 2002. Reporters will be at the election headquarters of the gubernatorial and senatorial candidates. In addition, NYU commentary on national and local races will feature special reports on the Hispanic vote, the death of the Liberal Party, the Lautenberg/Forrester campaigns and New York Governor George Pataki’s support for gay rights. Coverage begins at 9 P.M. EST.

The Terror and How We’re Coping
On September 12, 2001, Professor Marcia Rock gathered graduate and undergraduate students to cover the aftermath of the World Trade Center attacks. Students went to ground zero and interviewed volunteers, residents and rescue personnel. They also covered the effect on NYU from the streets being shut down, to displaced students to coping with the trauma. They did a story on alumni who were covering the story, the spontaneous gatherings at Union Square and the Candlelight Vigil in Washington Square Park. All of the stories, plus an emotional interview with NYU president Jay Oliva and others were put together into this hour newscast.

Turning Inward: Ethnic Tensions in Russia
In June 1999, NYU’s Center for War, Peace, and the News Media awarded a grant to six NYU graduate journalism students to produce a documentary examining ethnic discrimination in Russia. New immigrants from the country’s southern regions are routinely victimized in racially motivated attacks. Ethnic Russians say that these immigrants are born different, that they are criminals and should not be allowed in the country. The 28-minute documentary produced by NYU broadcast journalism students explores disparate perspectives on a common problem: formerly equal citizens who find themselves suddenly at odds.

 

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